Homicide and Power in the Roman Republic

Author: Judy E. Gaughan

Publisher: University of Texas Press

ISBN: 0292721110

Category: History

Page: 194

View: 7876

Embarking on a unique study of Roman criminal law, Judy Gaughan has developed a novel understanding of the nature of social and political power dynamics in republican government. Revealing the significant relationship between political power and attitudes toward homicide in the Roman republic, Murder Was Not a Crime describes a legal system through which families (rather than the government) were given the power to mete out punishment for murder. With implications that could modify the most fundamental beliefs about the Roman republic, Gaughan's research maintains that Roman criminal law did not contain a specific enactment against murder, although it had done so prior to the overthrow of the monarchy. While kings felt an imperative to hold monopoly over the power to kill, Gaughan argues, the republic phase ushered in a form of decentralized government that did not see itself as vulnerable to challenge by an act of murder. And the power possessed by individual families ensured that the government would not attain the responsibility for punishing homicidal violence. Drawing on surviving Roman laws and literary sources, Murder Was Not a Crime also explores the dictator Sulla's "murder law," arguing that it lacked any government concept of murder and was instead simply a collection of earlier statutes repressing poisoning, arson, and the carrying of weapons. Reinterpreting a spectrum of scenarios, Gaughan makes new distinctions between the paternal head of household and his power over life and death, versus the power of consuls and praetors to command and kill.
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Author: S. Fowler Wright

Publisher: Wildside Press LLC

ISBN: 1434403289

Category: Fiction

Page: 208

View: 5486

Crime writer Alfred Culbertson concocts a scheme to increase his royalties: he'll fake the murder of his cousin, Thomas Birchell (who's also hard-up for cash), and together they'll reap a bonanza. When Tom takes a dive off a nearby cliff, supposedly to reappear at a later date, all seems to be well -- until a mutilated corpse wrapped in Tom's clothes washes ashore. Is Tom really alive? Or will Alfred face the hangman himself when he's unable to answer the question: WAS MURDER DONE?
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Author: Gordon Honeycombe

Publisher: John Blake Publishing

ISBN: 1843584417

Category: True Crime

Page: 300

View: 5779

New Scotland Yard, the headquarters of London's Metropolitan Police, houses the notorious Black Museum, a unique collection of exhibits, photographs and other items connected with some of the most famous crimes of the last century. Fifty of those crimes were murders and they are explored in detail in this compelling book. Recently renamed The Crime Museum the author Gordon Honeycombe was given privileged access to its darkest secrets. His book spans a hundred years of murder, manslaughter and attempted assassinations and reveals the true facts behind some of the country's most notorious murder cases, including Jack the Ripper, Dr Crippen and the Krays. This is the ultimate guide to the most incredible crimes ever committed, featuring contemporary photographs never seen outside Scotland Yard. • Closely researched and objective, this book is a fascinating guide to murder and a grim insight into the minds of those who practice it. Honeycombe takes an unflinching look at why people murder and asks important questions about this most appalling of crimes, execution and the law itself.
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Author: Mary Aldrin

Publisher: iUniverse

ISBN: 059536019X

Category: Fiction

Page: 216

View: 8422

I love it. Ms. Aldrin has done an excellent job This novel is pure P.I. genre. -Tom Lipinski, Shamus Award winner The characters are very realistic the story is well-written and well-paced with vivid scenes -Patrick Picciarelli, author of Bloodshot Eyes In this soft-boiled mystery, a wealthy financier is murdered, and Nora Pearl, homicide detective turned P.I., gets the opportunity to match wits with two rivals. Mavens, the lead police detective, has always been hostile toward her. Marty, Nora's unfaithful and soon to be ex-husband, was promoted over her, many say unfairly, to C.O. of Homicide. Mavens and Marty's prime suspect is the victim's wife. She hires Nora to investigate, and Nora jumps at the chance to prove herself the better man, so to speak. Everyone has a motive-the brother who wants a bigger part of the family business, the ex-wife and former screen star whose income can't support her lifestyle, the drug addicted son who may not actually be the victim's son, the mistress who is all sexuality and ruthless ambition. Or could Mavens and Marty be right? As Nora delves into the case, she begins to fear her client might actually be the murderer.
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Felony Before the Courts from Edward I to the Sixteenth Century

Author: John G. Bellamy

Publisher: University of Toronto Press

ISBN: 9780802042958

Category: History

Page: 208

View: 1343

This book represents the first full-length study of the English criminal trial in a crucial period of its development (1300-1550). Based on prime source material, The Criminal Trial in Later Medieval England uses legal treatises, contemporary reports of instructive cases, chancery rolls, state papers and court files and rolls to reconstruct the criminal trial in the later medieval and early Tudor periods. There is particular emphasis on the accusation process (studied in depth here for the first time, showing how it was, in effect, a trial within a trial); the discovery of a veritable revolution in conviction rates between the early fifteenth century and the later sixteenth (why this revolution occurred is explained in detail); the nature and scope of the most prevalent types of felony in the period; and the startling contrast between the conviction rate and the frequency of actual punishment. The role of victims, witnesses, evidence, jurors, justices and investigative techniques are analysed. John Bellamy is one of the foremost scholars in the field of English criminal justice and in The Criminal Trial in Later Medieval England gives a masterful account of what the medieval legal process involved. He guides the reader carefully through the maze of disputed and controversial issues, and makes clear to the non-specialist why these disputes exist and what their importance is for a fuller understanding of medieval criminal law. Those with a special interest in medieval law, as well as all those interested in how society deals with crime, will appreciate Professor Bellamy's clarity and wisdom and his careful blend of critical overview and new insights.
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Passion and Fear in the Criminal Courtroom

Author: Cynthia Lee

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 0814765149

Category: Law

Page: 371

View: 7863

A man murders his wife after she has admitted her infidelity; another man kills an openly gay teammate after receiving a massage; a third man, white, goes for a jog in a “bad” neighborhood, carrying a pistol, and shoots an African American teenager who had his hands in his pockets. When brought before the criminal justice system, all three men argue that they should be found “not guilty”; the first two use the defense of provocation, while the third argues he used his gun in self-defense. Drawing upon these and similar cases, Cynthia Lee shows how two well-established, traditional criminal law defenses—the doctrines of provocation and self-defense—enable majority-culture defendants to justify their acts of violence. While the reasonableness requirement, inherent in both defenses, is designed to allow community input and provide greater flexibility in legal decision-making, the requirement also allows majority-culture defendants to rely on dominant social norms, such as masculinity, heterosexuality, and race (i.e., racial stereotypes), to bolster their claims of reasonableness. At the same time, Lee examines other cases that demonstrate that the reasonableness requirement tends to exclude the perspectives of minorities, such as heterosexual women, gays and lesbians, and persons of color. Murder and the Reasonable Man not only shows how largely invisible social norms and beliefs influence the outcomes of certain criminal cases, but goes further, suggesting three tentative legal reforms to address problems of bias and undue leniency. Ultimately, Lee cautions that the true solution lies in a change in social attitudes.
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Author: Kevin Cook

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN: 0393242919

Category: True Crime

Page: 288

View: 4900

A new perspective on the murder that has captured America’s imagination for over a half-century—“gripping” (New York Times Book Review). New York City, 1964. A young woman is stabbed to death on her front stoop—a murder the New York Times called “a frozen moment of dramatic, disturbing social change.” The victim, Catherine “Kitty” Genovese, became an urban martyr, butchered by a sociopathic killer in plain sight of thirty-eight neighbors who “didn’t want to get involved.” Her sensational case provoked an anxious outcry and launched a sociological theory known as the “Bystander Effect.” That’s the narrative told by the Times, movies, TV programs, and countless psychology textbooks. But as award-winning author Kevin Cook reveals, the Genovese story is just that, a story. The truth is far more compelling—and so is the victim. Now, on the fiftieth anniversary of her murder, Cook presents the real Kitty Genovese. She was a vibrant young woman—unbeknownst to most, a lesbian—a bartender working (and dancing) her way through the colorful, fast-changing New York of the ’60s, a cultural kaleidoscope marred by the Kennedy assassination, the Cold War, and race riots. Downtown, Greenwich Village teemed with beatniks, folkies, and so-called misfits like Kitty and her lover. Kitty Genovese evokes the Village’s gay and lesbian underground with deep feeling and colorful detail. Cook also reconstructs the crime itself, tracing the movements of Genovese’s killer, Winston Moseley, whose disturbing trial testimony made him a terrifying figure to police and citizens alike, especially after his escape from Attica State Prison. Drawing on a trove of long-lost documents, plus new interviews with her lover and other key figures, Cook explores the enduring legacy of the case. His heartbreaking account of what really happened on the night Genovese died is the most accurate and chilling to date.
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The Blood Crimes at the Sam Donaldson Ranch

Author: Robert Scott

Publisher: Kensington Publishing Corp.

ISBN: 0786038527

Category: True Crime

Page: 385

View: 2498

From the New York Times–bestselling author: The shocking true story of the murders at ABC News journalist Sam Donaldson’s New Mexico ranch. ABC News journalist Sam Donaldson needed a new manager for his sprawling New Mexico ranch. He found the perfect hire in Paul Posey, who quickly settled into his new life with his family in tow. Then, in July 2004, Donaldson was stunned to discover that his ranch had become a blood-soaked crime scene. The bullet-riddled bodies of Paul, his wife, and stepdaughter were found buried in a pile of manure. Paul’s fourteen-year-old son, Cody, was soon in custody. But the shocking revelations had only just begun . . . The Poseys appeared to be an ordinary American family. But was their seeming normalcy a carefully constructed veneer? Cody claimed he had suffered years of relentless physical and psychological abuse at the hands of his father, stepmother, and stepsister. Witnesses at the trial included Sam Donaldson, as well as neighbors who supported Cody’s claims—and others who disputed them. Was Cody a cold-blooded killer? Or was he acting in self-defense? It would be up to a jury to separate the lies from the truth, and decide the fate of a teenager . . .
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Author: James Fitzjames Stephen

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1108060730

Category: History

Page: 514

View: 8458

Published in 1883, this three-volume account of English criminal law's development since 1200 remains a classic work of legal historical scholarship.
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Author: Catherine Elliott,Frances Quinn

Publisher: Pearson Education

ISBN: 9781405858717

Category: Criminal law

Page: 417

View: 6785

As well as setting out the law itself, the authors examine the principles behind criminal law, and discuss some of the issues and debates arising from it.
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Author: Sara Schatz

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9401792496

Category: Social Science

Page: 114

View: 2748

This brief fills a gap in the studies of organized crime in Mexico (Kan 2012, Ríos 2011, Dell 2011) by documenting and mapping the post-2008 assassination of Mexican border police chiefs. It traces out a “systematic” of law-enforcement assassination in Northern Tier Mexico, showing how the selective, often sequential, hits by cartels on chiefs in border towns and along key drug-trafficking corridors has proven an effective strategy by organized crime elements to serve several goals: (1) to retaliate for federal, state and local prosecution, (2) to try and neutralize police chiefs, (3) to achieve intermittent local governance and/or to seed corrupt police chiefs at the municipal level, and, (4) to reduce local governmental capacity to obtain greater freedom for movement of goods. It is argued that the tactical advantage of organized crime elements gives them relatively easy physical access to law enforcement targets and thus is thus one prime element facilitating the use of assassination as a strategy. U.S. and Mexican legal, political and judicial institutions have not been able to adequately restrict opportunity for law-enforcement assassinations. The inability to reduce access to weapons and officials, to increase security for police personnel, to reduce corruption and punish offenders sets the stage for the assassination of local law enforcement. Yet, it is the goals of organized crime elements (to clear drug-smuggling routes and to try and gain more pliant governance at the municipal level) that ultimately motivate such killings.
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Author: Thomas J. Gardner,Terry M. Anderson

Publisher: Cengage Learning

ISBN: 1285401247

Category: Social Science

Page: 560

View: 565

CRIMINAL EVIDENCE: PRINCIPLES AND CASES, 8th Edition, delivers the key rules of evidence in criminal matters as well their interpretations and applications, and is especially useful for students planning a career in law enforcement or law. Comprehensive without being encyclopedic or overwhelming, the text gives students the rationale behind the rules and demonstrates how law enforcement officers apply them on the job. This text includes many of the features that popularized Gardner and Anderson's best-selling CRIMINAL LAW, such as high-interest examples, key concepts boxes, and case excerpts that engage students and make the topics more relevant. Important Notice: Media content referenced within the product description or the product text may not be available in the ebook version.
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An Inspector Combridge & Mr. Jellipot Classic Crime Novel

Author: S. Fowler Wright

Publisher: Wildside Press LLC

ISBN: 1434443779

Category: Fiction

Page: 236

View: 5663

Francis Hammerton is arrested and convicted of involvement with a gang of confidence men--a charge of which he is entirely innocent--but escapes police custody when a cell door is left unlocked. He finds refuge at a nearby boarding house, but is arrested again when he discovers (and reports) the murdered body of an upstairs tenant--and then is unjustly accused of murder. The dead man had been suspected of a major bank fraud, and was being investigated by a private detective firm. Francis secures the services of Mr. Jellipot, whom his father had known, and although Jellipot isn't a criminal attorney, he agrees to handle the case. And then, piece by patient piece, the little solicitor begins fitting together the shadowy pieces of this complex series of crimes. But can he find the true culprit in time, and also get Francis exonerated of the offense for which he's already been convicted? An absolutely gripping crime novel from the 1930s!
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A Chronicle of an Assassination

Author: Brendan H. Egan, Jr.

Publisher: Xlibris Corporation

ISBN: 1465324844

Category: History

Page: 390

View: 3866

It was a sad generation that limped past 1865. Almost every family had been touched by death, and many had been torn apart as sons, brothers, and fathers chose different sides in the Civil War. Murder at Fords Theatre is a history of an assassination with the Civil War as its tragic backdrop and with characters to match this tragedy. There was Lewis Paine, the devoted follower and David Herold who wanted desperately to belong and lose his reputation as an untrustworthy loafer. There are tragic failures of Mary Surratt and Dr. Samuel Mudd, as well as Abraham Lincoln, unappreciated by the public until his martyrdom. Lincoln refused security and put himself in harms way. Harm came in the form of John Wilkes Booth, an acclaimed actor, who wanted to save his beloved South and believed there was only one way to accomplish his goal. Booth had grown up with his own demons--depression and odd behavior were part of his family background. His darker side was hate. When the war broke out, Booth took up the southern cause -- the rest of the family sided with the North. Lincoln was a perfect object for Booths hatred. He suspended Habeas Corpus, put many anti-war advocates in jail, continued the war with its grisly pile of human deaths, refused to negotiate a treaty, and wrote Emancipation Proclamation. Booth, who had spent the war in a noncombat position at the behest of his mother, received news of the end of the war with increased anger. Soon it would be too late to become a hero. His hasty and disorganized plan to assassinate Lincoln went awry. Booth did shoot Lincoln, but during his escape he broke his ankle, an injury that slowed him and led to his capture and death. Only the Bible has been written about more than the Civil War, and the assassination of Lincoln is a part of that story. This is that story.
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