Manhood and Sports in Protestant America, 1880-1920

Author: Clifford Putney

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 9780674042407

Category: History

Page: 310

View: 5526

Dissatisfied with a Victorian culture focused on domesticity and threatened by physical decline in sedentary office jobs, American men in the late nineteenth century sought masculine company in fraternal lodges and engaged in exercise to invigorate their bodies. One form of this new manly culture, developed out of the Protestant churches, was known as muscular Christianity. In this fascinating study, Clifford Putney details how Protestant leaders promoted competitive sports and physical education to create an ideal of Christian manliness.
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Manhood and Sports in Protestant America, 1880-1920

Author: Clifford Putney

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780674011250

Category: History

Page: 300

View: 9094

Describes how Protestant leaders promoted competitive sports and physical education to create an ideal of Christian manliness through organizations like the Boy Scouts and the Young Men's Christian Association (YMCA) by leaders such as Dwight L. Moody, G. Stanley hall and Theodore Roosevelt.
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Embodying the Victorian Age

Author: Donald E. Hall

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521027076

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 260

View: 1714

Muscular Christianity was an important religious, literary, and social movement of the mid-nineteenth century. This volume draws on recent developments in culture and gender theory to reveal ideological links between Muscular Christianity and the work ofnovelists and essayists, including Kingsley, Emerson, Dickens, Hughes, MacDonald, and Pater, and to explore the use of images of hyper-masculinised male bodies to represent social as well as physical ideals. Muscular Christianity argues that the ideologies of the movement were extreme versions of common cultural conceptions, and that anxieties evident in Muscular Christian texts, often manifested through images of the body as a site of socio-political conflict, were pervasive throughout society. Throughout, Muscular Christianity is shown to be at the heart of issues of gender, class, and national identity in the Victorian age.
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Evangelical Protestants and the Development of American Sport

Author: Tony Ladd,James A. Mathisen

Publisher: Baker Publishing Group

ISBN: 9780801058479

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 4591

The definitive guide to the increasingly popular field of sports ministry.
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The Buying & Selling of American Holidays

Author: Leigh Eric Schmidt

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 9780691017211

Category: History

Page: 363

View: 9589

Slogans such as "Let's put Christ back into Christmas" or "Jesus is the Reason for the Season" hold an appeal to Christians who oppose the commercializing of events they hold sacred. However, through a close look at the rise of holidays in the United States, Leigh Schmidt show us that commercial appropriations of these occasions were as religious in form as they were secular. The rituals of America's holiday bazaar that emerged in the nineteenth century offered a luxuriant merger of the holy and the profane--a heady blend of fashion and faith, merchandising and gift-giving, profits and sentiments, all celebrations of a devout consumption. In this richly illustrated book, which captures both the blessings and ballyhoo of American holiday observances for the mid-eighteenth century through the twentieth, the author offers a reassessment of the "consumer rites" that various social critics have long decried for their spiritual emptiness and banal sentimentality. Schmidt tells the story of how holiday celebrations were almost banished by Puritans and other religious reformers in the colonies but went on to be romanticized and reinvented in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Merchants and advertisers were crucial for the reimagining of the holidays, promoting them in a grand, carnivalesque manner, which could include gargantuan fruit cakes, masked Santa Clauses, and exploding valentines. Along the way Schmidt uses everything from diaries to manuals on church decoration and window display to show in bright detail the ways in which people have prepared for and celebrated specific holidays--such as going Christmas shopping, making love tokens, choosing Easter bonnets, sending flowers to Mom, buying ties for Dad. He demonstrates in particular how women took the lead as holiday consumers, shaping warm-hearted celebrations of home and family through their intricate engagement with the marketplace. Bringing together the history of business, religion, and gender, this book offers a fascinating cultural history of an endlessly debated marvel--the commercialization of the American holidays.
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Author: Bret Carroll

Publisher: SAGE Publications

ISBN: 1452265712

Category: Social Science

Page: 576

View: 5500

"This is a highly recommended purchase for undergraduate, medium-sized, and large public libraries wishing to provide a substantial introduction to the field of men's studies." --Reference & User Services Quarterly "Pleasing layout and good cross-references make Carroll's compendium a welcome addition to collections serving readers of all ages. Highly recommended." --CHOICE "An excellent index, well-chosen photographs and illustrations, and an extensive bibliography add further value. American Masculinities is well worth what would otherise be too hefty a price for many libraries because no other encyclopedia comes close to covering this growing field so well." --American Reference Books Annual American Masculinities: A Historical Encyclopedia is a first-of-its-kind reference, detailing developments in the growing field of men's studies. This up-to-date analytical review serves as a marker of how the field has evolved over the last decade, especially since the 1993 publication of Anthony Rotundo's American Manhood. This seminal book opened new vistas for exploration and research into American History, society, and culture. Weaving the fabric of American history, American Masculinities illustrates how American political leaders have often used the rhetoric of manliness to underscore the presumed moral righteousness and ostensibly protective purposes of their policies. Seeing U.S. history in terms of gender archetypes, readers will gain a richer and deeper understanding of America's democratic political system, domestic and foreign policies, and capitalist economic system, as well as the "private" sphere of the home and domestic life. The contributors to American Masculinities share the assumption that men's lives have been grounded fundamentally in gender, that is, in their awareness of themselves as males. Their approach goes beyond scholarship which traditionally looks at men (and women) in terms of what they do and how they have influenced a given field or era. Rather, this important work delves into the psychological core of manhood which is shaped not only by biology, but also by history, society, and culture. Encapsulating the current state of scholarly interpretation within the field of Men's Studies, American Masculinities: A Historical Encyclopedia is designed to help students and scholars advance their studies, develop new questions for research, and stimulate new ways of exploring the history of American life. Key Features - Reader's Guide facilitates browsing by topic and easy access to information - Extensive name, place, and concept index gives users an additional means of locating topics of interest - More than 250 entries, each with suggestions for further reading - Cross references direct users to related information - Comprehensive bibliography includes a list of sources organized by categories in the field Topics Covered - Arts, Literature, and Popular Culture - Body, Health, and Sexuality - Class, Ethnic, Racial, and Religious Identities - Concepts and Theories - Family and Fatherhood - General History - Icons and Symbols - Leisure and Work - Movements and Organizations - People - Political and Social Issues About the Editor Bret E. Carroll is Associate Professor of History at California State University, Stanislaus. He received his Ph.D. from Cornell University in 1991. He is author of The Routledge Historical Atlas of Religion in America (1997), Spiritualism in Antebellum America (1997), and several articles on nineteenth-century masculinity.
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The Lives of Peter and Fanny Gulick, 1797-1883

Author: Clifford Putney

Publisher: Univ of Massachusetts Press

ISBN: 9781558497351

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 218

View: 9513

An unvamished account of missionary life in Hawai'i
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Cities and Tourists in the Nineteenth-Century American West

Author: J. Philip Gruen

Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press

ISBN: 0806147326

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 312

View: 7112

In Manifest Destinations, J. Philip Gruen examines the ways in which tourists experienced Chicago, Denver, Salt Lake City, and San Francisco between 1869 and 1893, a period of rapid urbanization and accelerated modernity. Gruen pays particular attention to the contrast between the way these cities were promoted and the way visitors actually experienced them.
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Author: Anthony Synnott

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134850255

Category: Social Science

Page: 320

View: 767

In this captivating book Anthony Synnott explores a subject which has been woefully ignored: our bodies. He surveys the history for thinking about the body and the senses, then focuses on specific themes: gender, beauty, the face, hair, touch, smell and sight. He concludes with a review of classical and contemporary theories of the body and the senses. Thinking about the body will never be the same after reading this book.
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Images of the Christian Man and Male Spirituality in White Protestant America

Author: Charles H. Lippy

Publisher: Univ. of Tennessee Press

ISBN: 9781572333581

Category: Religion

Page: 275

View: 8888

Spirituality has long been regarded as a haven of the female gender?and a componentequally deficient in men?particularly among the white male Protestant population.So, it was with much surprise that the American media greeted the seeminglysudden explosion of the Promise Keepers movement with its emotional stadium ralliesand vivid images of praying men openly recommitting to their faith. The shatteringof a long-held stereotype brought into question the veracity behind long-held perceptions of men and the depth and nature of their piety.In Do Real Men Pray?, author Charles H. Lippy argues that, in fact, American menhave always exhibited a deep and profound spirituality. He challenges the popular beliefthat men somehow cannot match the profundity found in female spirituality. Instead, Lippy lays out a convincing counterargument that the United States has a long and pronounced history of male spirituality.Do Real Men Pray? takes the reader through a chronological history of male spiritualityfrom the colonial period to the present day. Along the way, Lippy introduces readers tosix distinct, powerful images that manifested themselves as the ideal of American Protestant identity at different periods in history: the dutiful patriarch, the gentleman entrepreneur, the courageous adventurer, the efficient businessman, the positive thinker (inspired by the ubiquitous Norman Vincent Peale), and the modern-day faithful leader. From the piety of Cotton Mather to the ?muscular Christianity? of the early twentieth century, this book reveals a clear understanding of the obvious effect spirituality had on men.This book is the first to address thematically the history of male spirituality in theUnited States and is a rich, well-documented addition to the field of religious studies.Do Real Men Pray? will appeal to anyone with an interest in religious history in theUnited States as well as anyone interested in gender studies.
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Sports and Religion in America

Author: Robert J. Higgs

Publisher: University Press of Kentucky

ISBN: 0813158060

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 400

View: 2221

From the worship of Michael Jordan to the downfall of O.J. Simpson, it has become clear that sports and sports heroes have assumed a role in American society far out of proportion to their traditional value. In this powerful critique of present-day American popular culture, Robert J. Higgs examines the complex and increasingly pervasive control that sports wield in shaping the national self-image. He provides a thoughtful history and analysis of how sports and religion have become intertwined and offers a stinging indictment of the sports-religion-media-education complex. Beginning with the place of sports in Puritan life, Higgs traces the contributions of various individuals and institutions to the present circumstances in which sports and religion are joined. He discusses the transfer of the Puritan ideal to the New World and then moves to the revolutionary period of the national hero and manifest destiny, through the classic period of education for a sound mind in a sound body, to the imperial phase of American supremacy. In the process of tracing this history Higgs makes clear the growing influence of "muscular" Christianity, from circuit-riding evangelists to pulpit-pounding televangelists, from Billy Sunday to Billy Graham, from the YMCA to the Fellowship of Christian Athletes. Finally he arrives at our present Low Roman or "bread and circuses" period in which sports simultaneously serve the purposes of entertainment, religious proselytism, distraction of the masses, and political propaganda, all under the colorful banner of Christian knighthood as seen in the stadium revivals of Billy Graham and the sporting enthusiasm of Jerry Falwell. In brief, sports and Christianity have followed similar paths. In the beginning they were nationalized, then Hellenized, then Romanized, and, in our own time, televised. The result is that spectator sports have become the reigning American religion, one sharply at odds with a traditional shepherd ethos. This well-written and innovative book makes clear the dangerous power wielded by the sports-religion-media-education complex over the minds and energies of the American people. It is a call for recognition and reevaluation of our present situation that will concern anyone interested in the future of American culture.
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Being Honest in Just-War Thinking

Author: John Howard Yoder

Publisher: Wipf and Stock Publishers

ISBN: 1579107818

Category: Religion

Page: 190

View: 9031

Can a war really be considered justÓ? If so, which wars, and under what circumstances? If not, why not? When War is Unjust provides a systematic exploration of these questions for students of ethics, Christian doctrine, and history. For centuries the just war tradition has been the dominant framework for Christian thinking about organized conflict. This tradition sets a number of specific conditions which must be satisfied before a particular war can termed justÓ and therefore supportable by the faithful Christians. John Howard Yoder, himself a pacifist, approaches the just war theory on its own terms. His purpose: to introduce the student to this just-war tradition, and to offer a critical framework for evaluating its tenets and applying them to real conflicts. When War is Unjust takes the just war tradition seriously, and holds its proponents accountable in a critical debate about when - if ever - war can be justified. It is a readable and thought-provoking primer on the history, criteria, and application of just war teaching in Christian churches.
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Men's Bodies, Britain, and the Great War

Author: Joanna Bourke

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226067469

Category: History

Page: 336

View: 2630

Some historians contend that femininity was "disrupted, constructed and reconstructed" during World War I, but what happened to masculinity? Using the evidence of letters, diaries, and oral histories of members of the military and of civilians, as well as contemporary photographs and government propoganda, Dismembering the Male explores the impact of the First World War on the male body. Each chapter explores a different facet of the war and masculinity in depth. Joanna Bourke discovers that those who were dismembered and disabled by the war were not viewed as passive or weak, like their civilian counterparts, but were the focus of much government and public sentiment. Those suffering from disease were viewed differently, often finding themselves accused of malingering. Joanna Bourke argues convincingly that military experiences led to a greater sharing of gender identities between men of different classes and ages. Dismembering the Male concludes that ultimately, attempts to reconstruct a new type of masculinity failed as the threat of another war, and with it the sacrifice of a new generation of men, intensified.
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From Colonization to Globalization

Author: Gems, Gerald,Borish, Linda,Pfister, Gertrud

Publisher: Human Kinetics

ISBN: 1492526525

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 400

View: 9502

Sports in American History: From Colonization to Globalization, Second Edition, journeys from the early American past to the present to give students a compelling grasp of the evolution of American sporting practices.
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Religion and Modern Sport

Author: William J Baker

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 0674020448

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 336

View: 4781

Like no other nation on earth, Americans eagerly blend their religion and sports. This book traces this dynamic relationship from the Puritan condemnation of games as sinful in the seventeenth century to the near deification of athletic contests in our own day.
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A Social, Cultural, and Historical Encyclopedia

Author: Michael S. Kimmel,Amy Aronson

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN: 1576077748

Category: Reference

Page: 892

View: 7911

Alphabetically arranged original essays explore such topics as historical movements, race and masculinity, marriage, and aging.
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Author: Huijie Zhang

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 1351810669

Category:

Page: N.A

View: 3416

Despite the popularity of sport in contemporary China, the practice of physical education is not indigenous to its culture. Strenuous physical activity was traditionally linked to low class and status in the pre-modern Chinese society. The concept of modern PE was introduced to China by Western Christian missionaries and directors of the Young Men's Christian Association (YMCA). It then grew from a tool for Christian evangelism to a strategic instrument in Chinese nation-building. This book examines the transformation of Chinese attitudes toward PE and sport, drawing on the concepts of cultural imperialism and nationalism to understand how an imported Western activity became a key aspect of modernization for the Chinese state. More specifically, it looks at the relationship between Christianity and the rise of Chinese nationalism between 1840 and 1937. Combining historical insight with original research, this book sheds new light on the evolution of PE and sport in modern China. It is fascinating reading for all those with an interest in sports history, Chinese culture and society, Christianity, physical education or the sociology of sport.
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Homecoming of an African

Author: Lamin Sanneh

Publisher: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing

ISBN: 0802867421

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 281

View: 3028

Sanneh's fascinating journey from his an impoverished village in West Africa to education in the United States and Europe to a distinguished career teaching at the Universities of Yale, Harvard, Aberdeen, and Ghana. Burning theological questions about God's nature and human suffering eventually led Sanneh to convert from Islam to Christianity. He recounts the unusually varied life experiences that have made him who he is today.
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A History of White College Fraternities

Author: Nicholas L. Syrett

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

ISBN: 9780807888704

Category: Social Science

Page: 432

View: 9011

Tracing the full history of traditionally white college fraternities in America from their days in antebellum all-male schools to the sprawling modern-day college campus, Nicholas Syrett reveals how fraternity brothers have defined masculinity over the course of their 180-year history. Based on extensive research at twelve different schools and analyzing at least twenty national fraternities, The Company He Keeps explores many factors--such as class, religiosity, race, sexuality, athleticism, intelligence, and recklessness--that have contributed to particular versions of fraternal masculinity at different times. Syrett demonstrates the ways that fraternity brothers' masculinity has had consequences for other students on campus as well, emphasizing the exclusion of different groups of classmates and the sexual exploitation of female college students.
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The Faith of Our Founding Fathers

Author: John Eidsmoe

Publisher: Baker Academic

ISBN: 9780801052316

Category: Religion

Page: 480

View: 2869

Using the writings of the founders and records of their conversations and activities, John Eidsmoe demonstrates the influence of Christianity on the political convictions of the founding fathers.
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