An Environmental History of Congaree National Park

Author: Mark Kinzer

Publisher: Univ of South Carolina Press

ISBN: 1611177677

Category: Social Science

Page: 328

View: 5804

Located at the confluence of the Congaree and Wateree Rivers in central South Carolina, Congaree National Park protects the nation’s largest intact expanse of old-growth bottomland hardwood forest. Modern visitors to the park enjoy a pristine landscape that seems ancient and untouched by human hands, but in truth its history is far different. In Nature’s Return, Mark Kinzer examines the successive waves of inhabitants, visitors, and landowners of this region by synthesizing information from property and census records, studies of forest succession, tree-ring analyses, slave narratives, and historical news accounts. Established in 1976, Congaree National Park contains within its boundaries nearly twenty-seven thousand acres of protected uplands, floodplains, and swamps. Once exploited by humans for farming, cattle grazing, plantation agriculture, and logging, the park area is now used gently for recreation and conservation. Although the impact of farming, grazing, and logging in the park was far less extensive than in other river swamps across the Southeast, it is still evident to those who know where to look. Today Congaree National Park is a forest of vast flats and winding sloughs where champion trees dot the landscape. Indeed its history of human use and conservation make it a valuable laboratory for the study not only of flora and fauna but also of anthropology and modern history. As the impact of human disturbance fades, the Congaree’s stature as one of the most important natural areas in the eastern United States only continues to grow.
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A Search for the Future of National Parks

Author: William C. Tweed

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520271386

Category: Nature

Page: 248

View: 469

"Uncertain Path is a must read for wilderness and parks lovers who also know that climate change must be addressed if we are to be good stewards of our natural heritage. Bill Tweed is leading us down the right trail just in time." —Carl Pope, Chairman, Sierra Club "Author and naturalist Bill Tweed, like Muir, assumed that large, wild parks and wilderness areas could protect themselves, if we just let nature run its course. But on a hike along the John Muir Trail Tweed comes to the realization that, 'Natural' processes cannot lead reliably to 'natural' results in a world where climate change, global population, and habitat fragmentation have changed the operating rules...' It is a vital lesson we must all learn and act on—quickly and decisively—if we want to pass on a wild heritage to future generations."—Bruce Hamilton, Deputy Executive Director, Sierra Club “Bill Tweed has that rare combination of deep historical knowledge and even deeper passion for the national parks. He displays them both in Uncertain Path, a journey through the High Sierra that looks at the past and potential future of these American treasures. I can’t think of a better trail guide.”—Dayton Duncan, author of The National Parks: America’s Best Idea "This is history from the inside, intimate and provocative, growing from both the trail and from forty years of living with the Sierra Nevada. Younger generations are redefining the value of national parks just as global climate change transforms the very ecosystems that parks preserve. Tempered by managing parks and wilderness and people, Bill Tweed measures these sweeping changes with a clear eye. With deep concern and courage, he offers a sober vision of how to manage our national parks in the 21st century."—Stephen Trimble, author of Bargaining for Eden: The Fight for the Last Open Spaces in America "After nearly four decades as a park ranger revealing the secrets of nature to the visiting public, Bill Tweed took a 240-mile walk through the Sierra Nevada and took us along. Nothing escapes his loving attention, and like John Muir, Tweed sees each thing as connected to everything else, drawing rich conclusions about the future of the national parks. By all means, don't miss this trip."—Jordan Fisher Smith, author of Nature Noir "Bill Tweed's Uncertain Path is an invitation to the high country of the Sierra Nevada and also public land issues and philosophy. It's a wise and challenging exercise with a grand broad view."—Gary Snyder, author of The Practice of the Wild: Essays
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Author: John E. Cely

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 1439662878

Category: Travel

Page: 96

View: 4660

Located in central South Carolina, only a few miles from the capital city of Columbia, Congaree National Park is the largest old-growth bottomland hardwood forest left in the country and one of the most biologically diverse parks within the national park system. Nearly 100 species of trees have been documented within the park, almost as many as in the entire Pacific Northwest. The park has one of the tallest hardwood forests anywhere in the temperate world and features numerous trees of record-setting proportions, a distinction that has earned it the name "Forest of Champions." This book discusses the early history of the area that later became the Congaree National Park, shows efforts to protect it from logging by a citizen's grassroots campaign, traces the park's early beginnings and development, and illustrates some of the park's notable flora and fauna.
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An Introduction

Author: Carolyn Merchant

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231140355

Category: Political Science

Page: 480

View: 3450

By studying the many ways diverse peoples have changed, shaped, and conserved the natural world over time, environmental historians provide insight into humanity's unique relationship with nature and, more importantly, are better able to understand the origins of our current environmental crisis. Beginning with the precolonial land-use practice of Native Americans and concluding with our twenty-first century concerns over our global ecological crisis, American Environmental History addresses contentious issues such as the preservation of the wilderness, the expulsion of native peoples from national parks, and population growth, and considers the formative forces of gender, race, and class. Entries address a range of topics, from the impact of rice cultivation, slavery, and the growth of the automobile suburb to the effects of the Russian sea otter trade, Columbia River salmon fisheries, the environmental justice movement, and globalization. This illustrated reference is an essential companion for students interested in the ongoing transformation of the American landscape and the conflicts over its resources and conservation. It makes rich use of the tools and resources (climatic and geological data, court records, archaeological digs, and the writings of naturalists) that environmental historians rely on to conduct their research. The volume also includes a compendium of significant people, concepts, events, agencies, and legislation, and an extensive bibliography of critical films, books, and Web sites.
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Linville Gorge, North Carolina, to Tallulah Gorge, Georgia

Author: L. L. Gaddy

Publisher: Reaktion Books

ISBN: 9781570033728

Category: Nature

Page: 190

View: 5740

A field guide which offers detailed descriptions of more than 50 natural areas in the gorge region of the Blue Ridge province. For each location Gaddy outlines points of interest, flora and fauna (including rare plants and endangered wild life), and other natural features.
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A Biography of the Great Smoky Mountains

Author: Margaret Lynn Brown

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780813020938

Category: History

Page: 457

View: 669

An exploration of the social, political and environmental changes in the Great Smoky Mountains during the 19th and 20th centuries. Although this national park is often portrayed as a triumph of wilderness preservation, Margaret Lynn Brown concludes that it is actually a recreated wilderness.
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The Promise and Peril of Sociogenomics

Author: Catherine Bliss

Publisher: Stanford University Press

ISBN: 1503603962

Category: Social Science

Page: 304

View: 7794

Sociogenomics has rapidly become one of the trendiest sciences of the new millennium. Practitioners view human nature and life outcomes as the result of genetic and social factors. In Social by Nature, Catherine Bliss recognizes the promise of this interdisciplinary young science, but also questions its implications for the future. As she points out, the claim that genetic similarities cause groups of people to behave in similar ways is not new—and a dark history of eugenics warns us of its dangers. Over the last decade, sociogenomics has enjoyed a largely uncritical rise to prominence and acceptance in popular culture. Researchers have published studies showing that things like educational attainment, gang membership, and life satisfaction are encoded in our DNA long before we say our first word. Strangely, unlike the racial debates over IQ scores in the '70s and '90s, sociogenomics has not received any major backlash. By exposing the shocking parallels between sociogenomics and older, long-discredited, sciences, Bliss persuasively argues for a more thoughtful public reception of any study that reduces human nature to a mere sequence of genes. This book is a powerful call for researchers to approach their work in more socially responsible ways, and a must-read for anyone who wants to better understand the scholarship that impacts how we see ourselves and our society.
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A Celebration of Our National Parks & Treasured Sites

Author: N.A

Publisher: Chronicle Books

ISBN: 1452149291

Category: Travel

Page: 192

View: 4915

To coincide with the 2016 centennial anniversary of the National Parks Service, the Creative Action Network has partnered with the National Parks Conservation Association to revive and reimagine the legacy of WPA travel posters. Artists from all over the world have participated in the creation of this new, crowdsourced collection of See America posters for a modern era. Featuring artwork for 75 national parks and monuments across all 50 states, this engaging ebook celebrates the full range of our nation's landmarks and treasured wilderness.
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Indian Removal and the Making of the National Parks

Author: Mark David Spence

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 9780195142433

Category: History

Page: 190

View: 5832

National parks like Yellowstone, Yosemite, and Glacier preserve some of this country's most cherished wilderness landscapes. While visions of pristine, uninhabited nature led to the creation of these parks, they also inspired policies of Indian removal. By contrasting the native histories of these places with the links between Indian policy developments and preservationist efforts, this work examines the complex origins of the national parks and the troubling consequences of the American wilderness ideal. The first study to place national park history within the context of the early reservation era, it details the ways that national parks developed into one of the most important arenas of contention between native peoples and non-Indians in the twentieth century.
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The Evolution of the National Park Idea

Author: Robert B. Keiter

Publisher: Island Press

ISBN: 1610912160

Category: Science

Page: 368

View: 1698

When the national park system was first established in 1916, the goal "to conserve unimpaired" seemed straightforward. But Robert Keiter argues that parks have always served a variety of competing purposes, from wildlife protection and scientific discovery to tourism and commercial development. In this trenchant analysis, he explains how parks must be managed more effectively to meet increasing demands in the face of climate, environmental, and demographic changes. Taking a topical approach, Keiter traces the history of the national park idea from its inception to its uncertain future. Thematic chapters explore our changing conceptions of the parks as wilderness sanctuaries, playgrounds, educational facilities, and more. He also examines key controversies that have shaped the parks and our perception of them. Ultimately, Keiter demonstrates that parks cannot be treated as special islands, but must be managed as the critical cores of larger ecosystems. Only when the National Park Service works with surrounding areas can the parks meet critical habitat, large-scale connectivity, clean air and water needs, and also provide sanctuaries where people can experience nature. Today's mandate must remain to conserve unimpaired—but Keiter shows how the national park idea can and must go much farther. Professionals, students, and scholars with an interest in environmental history, national parks, and federal land management, as well as scientists and managers working on adaptation to climate change should find the book useful and inspiring.
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A History : with a New Preface and Epilogue

Author: Richard West Sellars

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 0300154143

Category: Nature

Page: 404

View: 3478

This book traces the epic clash of values between traditional scenery-and-tourism management and emerging ecological concepts in the national parks, America’s most treasured landscapes. It spans the period from the creation of Yellowstone National Park in 1872 to near the present, analyzing the management of fires, predators, elk, bear, and other natural phenomena in parks such as Yellowstone, Yosemite, Grand Canyon, and Great Smoky Mountains. Based largely on original documents never before researched, this is the most thorough history of the national parks ever written. Focusing on the decades after the National Park Service was established in 1916, the author reveals the dynamics of policy formulation and change, as landscape architects, foresters, wildlife biologists, and other Park Service professionals contended for dominance and shaped the attitudes and culture of the Service. The book provides a fresh look at the national parks and an analysis of why the Service has not responded in full faith to the environmental concerns of recent times. Richard West Sellars, a historian with the National Park Service, has become uniquely familiar with the history, culture, and dynamics of the Service--including its biases, internal alliances and rivalries, self-image, folklore, and rhetoric. The book will prove indispensable for environmental and governmental specialists and for general readers seeking an in-depth analysis of one of America’s most admired federal bureaus.
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Tradition, Capital, and Circumstance in the Development of Camden and the Wateree Valley, 1740-1810

Author: Kenneth E. Lewis

Publisher: Univ of South Carolina Press

ISBN: 1611177456

Category: Social Science

Page: 456

View: 5315

The Carolina Backcountry Venture is a historical, geographical, and archaeological investigation of the development of Camden, South Carolina, and the Wateree River Valley during the second half of the eighteenth century. The result of extensive field and archival work by author Kenneth E. Lewis, this publication examines the economic and social processes responsible for change as well as documenting the importance of those individuals who played significant roles in determining the success of colonization and the form it took. Established to serve the frontier settlements, he store at Pine Tree Hill soon became an important crossroads in the economy of South Carolina’s central backcountry and a focus of trade that linked colonists with one another and the region’s native inhabitants. Renamed Camden in 1768, the town grew as the backcountry became enmeshed in the larger commercial economy. As pioneer merchants took advantage of improvements in agriculture and transportation and responded to larger global events such as the American Revolution, Camden evolved with the introduction of short staple cotton, which came to dominate its economy and slavery its society. Camden’s development as a small inland city made it an icon for progress and entrepreneurship. Camden was the focus of expansion in the Wateree Valley, and its early residents were instrumental in creating the backcountry economy. In the absence of effective, larger economic and political institutions, Joseph Kershaw and his associates created a regional economy by forging networks that linked the immigrant population and incorporated the native Catawba people. Their efforts formed the structure of a colonial society and economy in the interior and facilitated the backcountry’s incorporation into the commercial Atlantic world. This transition laid the groundwork for the antebellum plantation economy. Lewis references an array of primary and secondary sources as well as archaeological evidence from four decades of research in Camden and surrounding locations. The Carolina Backcountry Venture examines the broad processes involved in settling the area and explores the relationship between the region’s historical development and the andscape it created.
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North American Animals Confront Colonization

Author: Andrea L. Smalley

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN: 1421422352

Category: History

Page: 352

View: 7700

"Wild by Nature answers the question: how did indigenous animals shape the course of colonization in English America? The book argues that animals acted as obstacles to colonization because their wildness was at odds with Anglo-American legal assertions of possession. Animals and their pursuers transgressed the legal lines officials drew to demarcate colonizers' sovereignty and control over the landscape. Consequently, wild creatures became legal actors in the colonizing process--the subjects of statutes, the issues in court cases, and the parties to treaties--as authorities struggled to both contain and preserve the wildness that made those animals so valuable to English settler societies in North America in the first place. Only after wild creatures were brought under the state's legal ownership and control could the land be rationally organized and possessed. The book examines the colonization of American animals as a separate strand interwoven into a larger story of English colonizing in North America. As such, it proceeds along a different and longer timeline than other colonial histories, tracing a path through various wild animal frontiers from the seventeenth-century Chesapeake into the southern backcountry in the eighteenth century and across the Appalachians in the early nineteenth to end in the southern plains in the decades after the Civil War. Along the way, it maps out an argumentative arc that describes three manifestations of colonization as it variously applied to beavers, wolves, fish, deer, and bison. Wild by Nature engages broad questions about the environment, law, and society in early America"--
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The Democratization of Authoritarian Enclaves in America's Deep South, 1944-1972

Author: Robert Mickey

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 1400838789

Category: Political Science

Page: 584

View: 2564

The transformation of the American South--from authoritarian to democratic rule--is the most important political development since World War II. It has re-sorted voters into parties, remapped presidential elections, and helped polarize Congress. Most important, it is the final step in America's democratization. Paths Out of Dixie illuminates this sea change by analyzing the democratization experiences of Georgia, Mississippi, and South Carolina. Robert Mickey argues that Southern states, from the 1890s until the early 1970s, constituted pockets of authoritarian rule trapped within and sustained by a federal democracy. These enclaves--devoted to cheap agricultural labor and white supremacy--were established by conservative Democrats to protect their careers and clients. From the abolition of the whites-only Democratic primary in 1944 until the national party reforms of the early 1970s, enclaves were battered and destroyed by a series of democratization pressures from inside and outside their borders. Drawing on archival research, Mickey traces how Deep South rulers--dissimilar in their internal conflict and political institutions--varied in their responses to these challenges. Ultimately, enclaves differed in their degree of violence, incorporation of African Americans, and reconciliation of Democrats with the national party. These diverse paths generated political and economic legacies that continue to reverberate today. Focusing on enclave rulers, their governance challenges, and the monumental achievements of their adversaries, Paths Out of Dixie shows how the struggles of the recent past have reshaped the South and, in so doing, America's political development.
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The Greatest American Road Trip

Author: Stefanie Payne,Jonathan Irish

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780692926789

Category:

Page: 240

View: 8872

On January 1 of 2016, Stefanie Payne, a creative professional working at NASA Headquarters, and Jonathan Irish, a photographer with National Geographic, left their lives in Washington, D.C. and hit the open road on an expedition to explore and document all 59 of America's national parks during the centennial celebration of the U.S. National Park Service - 59 parks in 52 weeks - the Greatest American Road Trip. Captured in more than 300,000 digital photographs, written stories, and videos shared by the national and international media, their project resulted in an incredible view of America's National Park System seen in its 100th year. 'A Year in the National Parks, The Greatest American Road Trip' is a gorgeous visual journey through our cherished public lands, detailing a rich tapestry of what makes each park special, as seen along an epic journey to visit them all within one special celebratory year.
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Author: Johnny Molloy

Publisher: The Countryman Press

ISBN: 1581575599

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 256

View: 9265

Hikes and walks from the mountains to the Lowcountry Seasoned hiking author Johnny Molloy details 50 hikes of varied lengths and difficulties throughout verdant South Carolina, from the Chattooga River to the diverse terrain of the Midlands, including Congaree National Park, all the way to the Lowcountry, land of beaches and forgotten swamps and designated wildernesses. Specific emphasis is placed on the most scenic destinations and unique places that make the Palmetto State special. Each hike includes a helpful information section, trail map, trailhead directions, and stunning photographs, with intriguing commentary about the human or natural history along the way.
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Author: Lonely Planet

Publisher: Lonely Planet

ISBN: 1760341789

Category: Travel

Page: 328

View: 5674

To celebrate America's amazing national parks, Lonely Planet, the world's leading travel publisher, takes you on an informative and gorgeous tour of all 59 parks with our lavishly finished hardcover gift guide packed with detailed itineraries and practical tips on what to do and see in each park to get you started planning your next adventure. America's national parks are full of timeless marvels that still rejuvenate the soul: the world's largest trees in Sequoia; its most spectacular geothermal site in Yellowstone; the grandest canyon. Perhaps the movement's most eloquent description that is still resonates came from national parks advocate John Muir: 'Thousands of tired, nerve-shaken, over-civilized people are beginning to find out that going to the mountains is going home; that wildness is a necessity...' Fortunately for the nerve-shaken, over-civilized people of then and now, President Woodrow Wilson created the National Parks Service (NPS) on August 25, 1916, though the drive to protect some of America's most remarkable wild spaces, to be 'used and preserved for the benefit of mankind', began in the 1860s. From Acadia to Zion, this beautiful introduction to America's preserved natural treasures is packed with landscape photography, original wildlife illustrations, and practical information. You will surely be inspired to rediscover these incredible spaces and find out why they're worth celebrating and you'll have all the tools to plan the first of many exciting trips. This book is intended to be a practical introduction to each of America's 59 national parks, distilled by Lonely Planet's expert authors. We highlight the best activities and trails, explain how to get there and where to stay, show you the wildlife to watch out for, and suggest ideal itineraries. Whether you're lucky enough to have a park on your doorstep or need to travel further, we hope that the following pages inspire you both the iconic and lesser-known gems that make up the USA's diversely breathtaking expanses. Covers all 59 US National Parks: Acadia American Samoa Arches Badlands Big Bend Biscayne Black Canyon of the Gunnison Bryce Canyon Canyonlands Capitol Reef Carlsbad Caverns Channel Islands Congaree Crater Lake Cuyahoga Valley Death Valley Denali Dry Tortugas Everglades Gates of the Arctic Glacier Glacier Bay Grand Canyon Grand Teton Great Basin Great Sand Dunes Great Smoky Mountains Guadalupe Mountains Haleakal? Hawaii Volcanoes Hot Springs Isle Royale Joshua Tree Katmai Kenai Fjords Kings Canyon Kobuk Valley Lake Clark Lassen Volcanic Mammoth Cave Mesa Verde Mt Rainier North Cascades Olympic Petrified Forest Pinnacles Redwood Rocky Mountain Saguaro Sequoia Shenandoah Theodore Roosevelt Virgin Islands Voyageurs Wind Cave Wrangell-St Elias Yellowstone Yosemite Zion About Lonely Planet: Started in 1973, Lonely Planet has become the world's leading travel guide publisher with guidebooks to every destination on the planet, as well as an award-winning website, a suite of mobile and digital travel products, and a dedicated traveller community. Lonely Planet's mission is to enable curious travellers to experience the world and to truly get to the heart of the places they find themselves in.
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