Allegory, Empire and Postcolonial Writing

Author: Jade Munslow Ong

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317388364

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 196

View: 7888

This book works across established categories of modernism and postcolonialism in order to radically revise the periods, places, and topics traditionally associated with anti-colonialism and aesthetic experimentation in African literature. The book is the first account of Olive Schreiner as a theorist and practitioner of modernist form advancing towards an emergent postcolonialism. The book draws on and broadens discussions in and around the blossoming field of global modernist studies by interrogating the conventionally accepted genealogy of development that positions Europe and America as the sites of innovation. It provides an original examination of the relationships between metaphor, postcolonialism, and modernist experimentation by showing how politically and aesthetically innovative African forms rely on allegorical structures, in contrast to the symbolism dominant in Euro-American modernism. An original theoretical concept of the role of primitivism and allegory within the context of modernism and associated critical theory is proposed through the integration of postcolonial, Marxist, and ecocritical approaches to literature. The book provides original readings of Schreiner’s three novels, Undine, The Story of An African Farm, and From Man to Man, in light of the new theory of primitivism in African literature by directly addressing the issue of narrative form. This argument is contextualised in relation to the work of other Southern African authors, in whose writings the impact of Schreiner’s politics and aesthetics can be traced. These authors include J.M. Coetzee, Nadine Gordimer, Doris Lessing, Solomon T. Plaatje, and Zoe Wicomb, amongst others. This book brings the most current debates in modernist studies, ecocriticism, and primitivism into the field of postcolonial studies and contributes to a widening of the debates surrounding gender, race, empire, and modernism.
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Author: Olive Schreiner

Publisher: Read Books Ltd

ISBN: 1473397146

Category: Fiction

Page: 430

View: 6051

This early work by Olive Schreiner was originally published in 1883 and we are now republishing it with a brand new introductory biography. 'The Story of an African Farm' was penned under the pseudonym Ralph Iron and the novel details the lives of three characters, first as children and then as adults, and when published caused significant controversy over its frank portrayal of freethought, feminism, premarital sex, and transvestitism. Olive Emilie Albertina Schreiner was born on 24th March 1855 at the Wesleyan Missionary Society station at Wittebergen in the Eastern Cape, near Herschel in South Africa. In 1880, Olive set sail for the United Kingdom with the goal of taking a position as a trainee nurse at the Royal Infirmary in Edinburgh in Scotland. Unfortunately ill-health prevented her from studying and she was forced to concede that writing would and could be her only work in life. She became increasingly involved with the politics of the South Africa, leading her to make influential acquaintances such as Cecil John Rhodes, with whom she eventually became disillusioned and wrote a scathing allegory in his honour.
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Evolution, Gender and Empire

Author: C. Burdett

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 0230598978

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 232

View: 1501

Olive Schreiner and the Progress of Feminism explores two key areas: first, the debates taking place in England during the last two decades of the nineteenth century about the position of women; and, second, the volatile events of the 1890s in South Africa, which culminated in war between the British Empire and the Boer republics in 1899. Through a detailed reading of the fictional and non-fictional writing of one extraordinary woman, Olive Schreiner, it traces the complex relations between gender and empire in a modernizing world.
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A Biography

Author: Ruth First,Ann Scott

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780704341562

Category: Authors, South African

Page: 383

View: 5715

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Sarah Grand, Olive Schreiner, and Mona Caird

Author: Ann Heilman

Publisher: Manchester University Press

ISBN: 9780719057595

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 292

View: 9106

Recent years have seen a rennaissance of scholarly interest in the fin-de-siécle fiction of the New Woman. New Woman Strategies offers a new approach to the subject by focusing on the discursive strategies and revisionist aesthetics of the genre in the writings of three of its key exponents: Sarah Grand (1854-1943), Olive Schreiner (1855-1920) and Mona Caird (1854-1932). The study explores how each writer drew on, mimicked, feminized and ultimately transformed traditional literary and cultural tropes and paradigms: feminity, allegory and mythology.
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Olive Schreiner and the Anglo-Boer War, 1899-1902

Author: Karel Schoeman

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Authors, South African

Page: 239

View: 1792

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Olive Schreiner's Social Theory

Author: Liz Stanley

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134281706

Category: Social Science

Page: 206

View: 9411

Olive Schreiner (1855-1920) was the best-known feminist theorist and writer of her time. Her writings spanned a number of conventionally separate genres (including the novel, short story, allegory, political essay, polemic and theoretical treatise), which she crafted to produce a highly distinctive feminist and analytical 'voice'. A feminist who was contemporaneously an internationally-renowned social commentator, Schreiner's developing political analysis was - and still is - highly original. She developed a materially-based socialist and feminist analysis of 'labour' which led her to theorise social and economic change, divisions of labour in society and between women and men, capitalism and imperialism, around innovative ideas about how -- and by whom -- economic and social value was produced. She combined with this a keen attention to inter-personal relations, between women as literally or politically sisters, between 'respectable' and sexually outcast women, between feminist women and the 'New Men', and within the family. Distinctively, Schreiner's writings on economic and political life in South Africa criticised the policies and practice of Rhodes in the Cape Colony and British imperialism in southern Africa more widely. She opposed the South African War of 1899-1902, promoted federation rather than union as the form the South African state should take and insisted on equal political rights for all. Schreiner steadfastly opposed the development of apartheid segregationist policies and provided a radical analysis of the relationship between 'race' and capital. Imperialism, Labour and the New Woman is based on primary archive research, making particular use of Schreiner's unpublished letters and other major manuscript sources to provide a major reconceptualisation of the scope and importance of her writings and innovative and experimental ideas about genre and form. It offers a major rethinking of Schreiner's political writings on South Africa, and it emphasises the distinctiveness of Schreiner's contribution as the major feminist theorist of her age and that which followed. The book will appeal particularly to readers interested in the development of social theory, in influential feminist ideas and writing of the fin de sicle period, in the contemporary critique of capitalism and imperialism, and in 'the age of imperialism' in Southern Africa, as well as to Women's Studies scholars across the academic disciplines.
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Beyond South African Colonialism

Author: Joyce Avrech Berkman

Publisher: Univ of Massachusetts Press

ISBN: 9780870238369

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 317

View: 2506

A study of Olive Schreiner (1855-1920), the first white South African novelist to win international recognition. Schreiner was also known for her political and social treatises, which promoted feminism, socialism, pacifism and free thought, and which criticised racism and British imperialism.
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Author: Carolyn Burdett

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 1786945835

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: N.A

View: 590

Olive Schreiner, who was born in 1855 in South Africa, has become a central literary figure for thinking about the complex debates surrounding gender, imperialism and class between 1880 and 1920. Aesthetically bold and politically passionate, Schreiner wrote novels, short stories, lyrical fragments she called dreams, as well as non-fiction and political polemic. Her work is widely acknowledged as a significant, though unconventional, contribution to the 'New Woman' debates of the fin de siécle, while her anti-imperialism helped to challenge and reshape feminist thinking. This volume explores Schreiner's contribution to these debates, while also focusing on the shaping influence of both religion and science on her work. It discusses the range of her work, including her novels, The Story of an African Farm, Undine, and From Man to Man; her feminist tract Woman and Labour and short fictions and allegories about the position of women; and her diverse writings about South Africa, her country of birth.
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Author: Olive Schreiner

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Dreams

Page: 182

View: 2316

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Author: Olive Schreiner

Publisher: Read Books Ltd

ISBN: 1473397154

Category: Social Science

Page: 229

View: 6623

This early work by Olive Schreiner was originally published in 1911 and we are now republishing it with a brand new introductory biography. 'Woman and Labour' is a landmark work of feminist literature and deals with historical and societal issues of the role of women and the differences between the sexes. Olive Emilie Albertina Schreiner was born on 24th March 1855 at the Wesleyan Missionary Society station at Wittebergen in the Eastern Cape, near Herschel in South Africa. In 1880, Olive set sail for the United Kingdom with the goal of taking a position as a trainee nurse at the Royal Infirmary in Edinburgh in Scotland. Unfortunately ill-health prevented her from studying and she was forced to concede that writing would and could be her only work in life. In 1883, she produced her first published work The Story of an African Farm which she penned under the pseudonym Ralph Iron. This novel details the lives of three characters, first as children and then as adults, and caused significant controversy over its frank portrayal of freethought, feminism, premarital sex, and transvestitism. She became increasingly involved with the politics of the South Africa, leading her to make influential acquaintances such as Cecil John Rhodes, with whom she eventually became disillusioned and wrote a scathing allegory in his honour.
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Author: Olive Schreiner

Publisher: Courier Corporation

ISBN: 9780486404448

Category: Social Science

Page: 117

View: 8731

This feminist classic represents an eloquent call for the rectification of gender-related inequalities of early 20th century labor practices. Examines social changes engendered by technological progress, advocating expanded roles for women.
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Author: Olive Schreiner,Samuel Cron Cronwright-Schreiner

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Cape of Good Hope

Page: 148

View: 433

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Author: Cherry Clayton

Publisher: Twayne Publishers

ISBN: N.A

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 140

View: 4856

Schreiner's close relationships also led her to a deeper understanding of the effects of a hypocritical social code on women. Exploring the relationship between gender and imperialism, Clayton traces Schreiner's emerging feminism and discusses how the development of this ideal informed the author's opposition to colonialism
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The Intellectual and Apartheid

Author: Mark Sanders

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN: 0822384221

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 288

View: 1596

Complicities explores the complicated—even contradictory—position of the intellectual who takes a stand against political policies and ideologies. Mark Sanders argues that intellectuals cannot avoid some degree of complicity in what they oppose and that responsibility can only be achieved with their acknowledgment of this complicity. He examines the role of South African intellectuals by looking at the work of a number of key figures—both supporters and opponents of apartheid. Sanders gives detailed analyses of widely divergent thinkers: Afrikaner nationalist poet N. P. van Wyk Louw, Drum writer Bloke Modisane, Xhosa novelist A. C. Jordan, Afrikaner dissident Breyten Breytenbach, and Black Consciousness leader Steve Biko. Drawing on theorists including Derrida, Sartre, and Fanon, and paying particular attention to the linguistic intricacy of the literary and political texts considered, Sanders shows how complicity emerges as a predicament for intellectuals across the ideological and social spectrum. Through discussions of the colonial intellectuals Olive Schreiner and Sol T. Plaatje and of post-apartheid feminist critiques of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, Complicities reveals how sexual difference joins with race to further complicate issues of collusion. Complicities sheds new light on the history and literature of twentieth-century South Africa as it weighs into debates about the role of the intellectual in public life.
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Charlotte Bronte, Olive Schreiner, Katherine Mansfield

Author: R. Parkin-Gounelas

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 0230378250

Category: Social Science

Page: 203

View: 1711

Women's novels have traditionally been read as 'subjective'. Through an examination of three generations of women's fiction in the post-Romantic period, this book challenges traditional readings of women's novels and argues that fiction writing for women has often been a matter of self-erasure rather than self-inscription. In particular, it examines the changing strategies, sometimes collusive and sometimes rebellious, which Charlotte Bronte, Olive Schreiner and Katherine Mansfield employed in their tentative project of inscribing female subjectivity into the novel and story form.
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Women Rewriting the World

Author: Claudia Roth Pierpont

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 0679751130

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 298

View: 6215

Essays exploring the lives and literary achievements of twelve women writers--including Eudora Welty, Ayn Rand, Doris Lessing, Zora Neale Hurston, and Mary McCarthy--focus on how they shaped beliefs about issues ranging from sexual freedom to racial issues to politics. Reprint. 12,500 first printing.
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Author: Tara MacDonald

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317317793

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 240

View: 3262

By tracing the rise of the New Man alongside novelistic changes in the representations of marriage, MacDonald shows how this figure encouraged Victorian writers to reassess masculine behaviour and to re-imagine the marriage plot in light of wider social changes. She finds examples in novels by Dickens, Anne Brontë, George Eliot and George Gissing.
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