Author: Olive Schreiner

Publisher: Read Books Ltd

ISBN: 1473397189

Category: Political Science

Page: 65

View: 5644

This early work by Olive Schreiner was originally published in 1896 and we are now republishing it with a brand new introductory biography. 'The Political Situation in Cape Colony' is a work of political commentary on the governance of South Africa. Olive Emilie Albertina Schreiner was born on 24th March 1855 at the Wesleyan Missionary Society station at Wittebergen in the Eastern Cape, near Herschel in South Africa. In 1880, Olive set sail for the United Kingdom with the goal of taking a position as a trainee nurse at the Royal Infirmary in Edinburgh in Scotland. Unfortunately ill-health prevented her from studying and she was forced to concede that writing would and could be her only work in life. In 1883, she produced her first published work The Story of an African Farm which she penned under the pseudonym Ralph Iron. This novel details the lives of three characters, first as children and then as adults, and caused significant controversy over its frank portrayal of freethought, feminism, premarital sex, and transvestitism. She became increasingly involved with the politics of the South Africa, leading her to make influential acquaintances such as Cecil John Rhodes, with whom she eventually became disillusioned and wrote a scathing allegory in his honour.
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Author: Olive Schreiner

Publisher: Courier Corporation

ISBN: 9780486404448

Category: Social Science

Page: 117

View: 8532

This feminist classic represents an eloquent call for the rectification of gender-related inequalities of early 20th century labor practices. Examines social changes engendered by technological progress, advocating expanded roles for women.
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Author: Tara MacDonald

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317317793

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 240

View: 7558

By tracing the rise of the New Man alongside novelistic changes in the representations of marriage, MacDonald shows how this figure encouraged Victorian writers to reassess masculine behaviour and to re-imagine the marriage plot in light of wider social changes. She finds examples in novels by Dickens, Anne Brontë, George Eliot and George Gissing.
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Author: Olive Schreiner

Publisher: Read Books Ltd

ISBN: 1473397154

Category: Social Science

Page: 229

View: 5729

This early work by Olive Schreiner was originally published in 1911 and we are now republishing it with a brand new introductory biography. 'Woman and Labour' is a landmark work of feminist literature and deals with historical and societal issues of the role of women and the differences between the sexes. Olive Emilie Albertina Schreiner was born on 24th March 1855 at the Wesleyan Missionary Society station at Wittebergen in the Eastern Cape, near Herschel in South Africa. In 1880, Olive set sail for the United Kingdom with the goal of taking a position as a trainee nurse at the Royal Infirmary in Edinburgh in Scotland. Unfortunately ill-health prevented her from studying and she was forced to concede that writing would and could be her only work in life. In 1883, she produced her first published work The Story of an African Farm which she penned under the pseudonym Ralph Iron. This novel details the lives of three characters, first as children and then as adults, and caused significant controversy over its frank portrayal of freethought, feminism, premarital sex, and transvestitism. She became increasingly involved with the politics of the South Africa, leading her to make influential acquaintances such as Cecil John Rhodes, with whom she eventually became disillusioned and wrote a scathing allegory in his honour.
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Allegory, Empire and Postcolonial Writing

Author: Jade Munslow Ong

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317388364

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 196

View: 5668

This book works across established categories of modernism and postcolonialism in order to radically revise the periods, places, and topics traditionally associated with anti-colonialism and aesthetic experimentation in African literature. The book is the first account of Olive Schreiner as a theorist and practitioner of modernist form advancing towards an emergent postcolonialism. The book draws on and broadens discussions in and around the blossoming field of global modernist studies by interrogating the conventionally accepted genealogy of development that positions Europe and America as the sites of innovation. It provides an original examination of the relationships between metaphor, postcolonialism, and modernist experimentation by showing how politically and aesthetically innovative African forms rely on allegorical structures, in contrast to the symbolism dominant in Euro-American modernism. An original theoretical concept of the role of primitivism and allegory within the context of modernism and associated critical theory is proposed through the integration of postcolonial, Marxist, and ecocritical approaches to literature. The book provides original readings of Schreiner’s three novels, Undine, The Story of An African Farm, and From Man to Man, in light of the new theory of primitivism in African literature by directly addressing the issue of narrative form. This argument is contextualised in relation to the work of other Southern African authors, in whose writings the impact of Schreiner’s politics and aesthetics can be traced. These authors include J.M. Coetzee, Nadine Gordimer, Doris Lessing, Solomon T. Plaatje, and Zoe Wicomb, amongst others. This book brings the most current debates in modernist studies, ecocriticism, and primitivism into the field of postcolonial studies and contributes to a widening of the debates surrounding gender, race, empire, and modernism.
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essays on Southern African literature in honour of Guy Butler

Author: Don Maclennan

Publisher: David Philip Publishers

ISBN: N.A

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 233

View: 9817

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Author: Olive Schreiner

Publisher: Read Books Ltd

ISBN: 1473397200

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 140

View: 9179

This early work by Olive Schreiner was originally published in 1922 and we are now republishing it with a brand new introductory biography. 'Stories, Dreams and Allegories' is a posthumously collection of writings by Schreiner that include 'The Buddhist Priest's Wife', 'On the Banks of a Full River', 'Two Visions', and many more. Olive Emilie Albertina Schreiner was born on 24th March 1855 at the Wesleyan Missionary Society station at Wittebergen in the Eastern Cape, near Herschel in South Africa. In 1880, Olive set sail for the United Kingdom with the goal of taking a position as a trainee nurse at the Royal Infirmary in Edinburgh in Scotland. Unfortunately ill-health prevented her from studying and she was forced to concede that writing would and could be her only work in life. In 1883, she produced her first published work The Story of an African Farm which she penned under the pseudonym Ralph Iron. This novel details the lives of three characters, first as children and then as adults, and caused significant controversy over its frank portrayal of freethought, feminism, premarital sex, and transvestitism. She became increasingly involved with the politics of the South Africa, leading her to make influential acquaintances such as Cecil John Rhodes, with whom she eventually became disillusioned and wrote a scathing allegory in his honour.
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Author: Olive Schreiner

Publisher: Read Books Ltd

ISBN: 1473397146

Category: Fiction

Page: 430

View: 6251

This early work by Olive Schreiner was originally published in 1883 and we are now republishing it with a brand new introductory biography. 'The Story of an African Farm' was penned under the pseudonym Ralph Iron and the novel details the lives of three characters, first as children and then as adults, and when published caused significant controversy over its frank portrayal of freethought, feminism, premarital sex, and transvestitism. Olive Emilie Albertina Schreiner was born on 24th March 1855 at the Wesleyan Missionary Society station at Wittebergen in the Eastern Cape, near Herschel in South Africa. In 1880, Olive set sail for the United Kingdom with the goal of taking a position as a trainee nurse at the Royal Infirmary in Edinburgh in Scotland. Unfortunately ill-health prevented her from studying and she was forced to concede that writing would and could be her only work in life. She became increasingly involved with the politics of the South Africa, leading her to make influential acquaintances such as Cecil John Rhodes, with whom she eventually became disillusioned and wrote a scathing allegory in his honour.
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Author: Olive Schreiner

Publisher: Read Books Ltd

ISBN: 1473397219

Category: Fiction

Page: 382

View: 9193

This early work by Olive Schreiner was originally published in 1929 and we are now republishing it with a brand new introductory biography. 'Undine' is a semi-autobiographical novel about life in colonial South Africa. Olive Emilie Albertina Schreiner was born on 24th March 1855 at the Wesleyan Missionary Society station at Wittebergen in the Eastern Cape, near Herschel in South Africa. In 1880, Olive set sail for the United Kingdom with the goal of taking a position as a trainee nurse at the Royal Infirmary in Edinburgh in Scotland. Unfortunately ill-health prevented her from studying and she was forced to concede that writing would and could be her only work in life. In 1883, she produced her first published work The Story of an African Farm which she penned under the pseudonym Ralph Iron. This novel details the lives of three characters, first as children and then as adults, and caused significant controversy over its frank portrayal of freethought, feminism, premarital sex, and transvestitism. She became increasingly involved with the politics of the South Africa, leading her to make influential acquaintances such as Cecil John Rhodes, with whom she eventually became disillusioned and wrote a scathing allegory in his honour.
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Author: Olive Schreiner

Publisher: Read Books Ltd

ISBN: 1473397197

Category: Political Science

Page: 54

View: 3780

This early work by Olive Schreiner was originally published in 1909 and we are now republishing it with a brand new introductory biography. 'Closer Union: A Letter on South African Union and the Principles of Government' is a polemical work in which the author argues for greater rights for blacks and women in South Africa. Olive Emilie Albertina Schreiner was born on 24th March 1855 at the Wesleyan Missionary Society station at Wittebergen in the Eastern Cape, near Herschel in South Africa. In 1880, Olive set sail for the United Kingdom with the goal of taking a position as a trainee nurse at the Royal Infirmary in Edinburgh in Scotland. Unfortunately ill-health prevented her from studying and she was forced to concede that writing would and could be her only work in life. In 1883, she produced her first published work The Story of an African Farm which she penned under the pseudonym Ralph Iron. This novel details the lives of three characters, first as children and then as adults, and caused significant controversy over its frank portrayal of freethought, feminism, premarital sex, and transvestitism. She became increasingly involved with the politics of the South Africa, leading her to make influential acquaintances such as Cecil John Rhodes, with whom she eventually became disillusioned and wrote a scathing allegory in his honour.
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Author: University of South Africa. Dept. of English

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: English literature

Page: N.A

View: 8121

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Author: Olive Schreiner

Publisher: Read Books Ltd

ISBN: 1473397170

Category: Fiction

Page: 99

View: 8856

This early work by Olive Schreiner was originally published in 1897 and we are now republishing it with a brand new introductory biography. 'Trooper Peter Halket of Mashonaland' is a bitterly scathing allegory written about her disillusionment with the politics of Cecil John Rhodes. Olive Emilie Albertina Schreiner was born on 24th March 1855 at the Wesleyan Missionary Society station at Wittebergen in the Eastern Cape, near Herschel in South Africa. In 1880, Olive set sail for the United Kingdom with the goal of taking a position as a trainee nurse at the Royal Infirmary in Edinburgh in Scotland. Unfortunately ill-health prevented her from studying and she was forced to concede that writing would and could be her only work in life. In 1883, she produced her first published work The Story of an African Farm which she penned under the pseudonym Ralph Iron. This novel details the lives of three characters, first as children and then as adults, and caused significant controversy over its frank portrayal of freethought, feminism, premarital sex, and transvestitism.
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Author: Olive Schreiner

Publisher: Read Books Ltd

ISBN: 1473397162

Category: Fiction

Page: 37

View: 5972

This early work by Olive Schreiner was originally published in 1893 and we are now republishing it with a brand new introductory biography. 'Dream Life and Real Life; a Little African Story' is a short story that illuminates issues of ethnicity and gender through a tragic tale of a little girl that becomes enslaved by a family. Olive Emilie Albertina Schreiner was born on 24th March 1855 at the Wesleyan Missionary Society station at Wittebergen in the Eastern Cape, near Herschel in South Africa. In 1880, Olive set sail for the United Kingdom with the goal of taking a position as a trainee nurse at the Royal Infirmary in Edinburgh in Scotland. Unfortunately ill-health prevented her from studying and she was forced to concede that writing would and could be her only work in life. In 1883, she produced her first published work The Story of an African Farm which she penned under the pseudonym Ralph Iron. This novel details the lives of three characters, first as children and then as adults, and caused significant controversy over its frank portrayal of freethought, feminism, premarital sex, and transvestitism. She became increasingly involved with the politics of the South Africa, leading her to make influential acquaintances such as Cecil John Rhodes, with whom she eventually became disillusioned and wrote a scathing allegory in his honour.
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Author: Paul A. Scanlon

Publisher: Gale / Cengage Learning

ISBN: 9780787631345

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 526

View: 2010

This award-winning series systematically presents career biographies of writers from all eras and all genres through volumes dedicated to specific types of literature and time periods.
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Olive Schreiner's Social Theory

Author: Liz Stanley

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134281773

Category: Social Science

Page: 206

View: 9373

Olive Schreiner (1855-1920) was the best-known feminist theorist and writer of her time. Her writings spanned a number of conventionally separate genres (including the novel, short story, allegory, political essay, polemic and theoretical treatise), which she crafted to produce a highly distinctive feminist and analytical 'voice'. A feminist who was contemporaneously an internationally-renowned social commentator, Schreiner's developing political analysis was - and still is - highly original. She developed a materially-based socialist and feminist analysis of 'labour' which led her to theorise social and economic change, divisions of labour in society and between women and men, capitalism and imperialism, around innovative ideas about how -- and by whom -- economic and social value was produced. She combined with this a keen attention to inter-personal relations, between women as literally or politically sisters, between 'respectable' and sexually outcast women, between feminist women and the 'New Men', and within the family. Distinctively, Schreiner's writings on economic and political life in South Africa criticised the policies and practice of Rhodes in the Cape Colony and British imperialism in southern Africa more widely. She opposed the South African War of 1899-1902, promoted federation rather than union as the form the South African state should take and insisted on equal political rights for all. Schreiner steadfastly opposed the development of apartheid segregationist policies and provided a radical analysis of the relationship between 'race' and capital. Imperialism, Labour and the New Woman is based on primary archive research, making particular use of Schreiner's unpublished letters and other major manuscript sources to provide a major reconceptualisation of the scope and importance of her writings and innovative and experimental ideas about genre and form. It offers a major rethinking of Schreiner's political writings on South Africa, and it emphasises the distinctiveness of Schreiner's contribution as the major feminist theorist of her age and that which followed. The book will appeal particularly to readers interested in the development of social theory, in influential feminist ideas and writing of the fin de sicle period, in the contemporary critique of capitalism and imperialism, and in 'the age of imperialism' in Southern Africa, as well as to Women's Studies scholars across the academic disciplines.
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A Reader

Author: Patrick Williams,Laura Chrisman

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317325230

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 584

View: 6722

This popular text provides an in-depth introduction to debates within post-colonial theory and criticism. The readings are drawn from a diverse selection of thinkers both historical and contemporary.
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British Imperialism and South African Resistance in Haggard, Schreiner, and Plaatje

Author: Laura Chrisman

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780198122999

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 241

View: 5437

This book examines literary romance as a vehicle for the ideological contradictions of British imperialism in South Africa. Chrisman draws upon postcolonial theory and cultural materialism to discuss the imperialist Rider Haggard's fictional accounts of mining in King Solomon's Mines, and Zulu history in Nada the Lily, examining these novels as fraught responses to the introduction of capitalist modernity. She goes on to analyse the counter-narratives of metropolitan and African resistance of feminist Olive Schreiner and black nationalist Sol Plaatje. Exploring Schreiner's much-neglected Trooper Peter Halket of Mashonaland, Chrisman situates this book in relation to the violent creation of 'Rhodesia', the 1896-7 Shona uprisings, and contemporary criticism of Cecil Rhodes. In doing so, she shows how Schreiner's is a much more challenging example of anti-imperialist fiction than Conrad's Heart of Darkness, published two years later. Chrisman's discussion of Plaatje's Mhudi-the first black African novel in English-considers the book as a direct response to Haggard's imperialism and Schreiner's feminist theory. Locating the book through the politics and epistemology of the early ANC, she reveals how Plaatje challenges Haggard's misogyny and fatalistic historiography. Mhudi, she argues, is a novel whose nationalist and sexual politics are considerably more complex than has been recognized. Plaatje uses his narrative form to articulate both radical and liberal alternatives to white South African rule. Chrisman's book demonstrates how South Africa played an important if now overlooked role in British imperial culture, and shows the impact of capitalism itself in the making of racial, gender and national identities. This book makes an original contribution to studies of Victorian literature of empire; South African literary history; African studies; black nationalism; and the literature of resistance.
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