The Hiss-Chambers Case

Author: Allen Weinstein

Publisher: Hoover Inst Press

ISBN: 9780817912253

Category: History

Page: 753

View: 6741

This third edition of Perjury brings the controversial Alger Hiss case up to date with evidence that has only come to light in the past two decades. The author has sought and gained access to many previously undiscovered, unavailable, or ignored sources of documentary and oral evidence, both in this country and abroad, and verified numerous details about the case from the papers or recollections of those who lived through it.
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The Hiss-Chambers Case

Author: Allen Weinstein

Publisher: Hoover Press

ISBN: 0817912266

Category: Political Science

Page: 766

View: 802

When the Hiss-Chambers case first burst on the scene in 1948, its main characters and events seemed more appropriate to spy fiction than to American reality. The major historical authority on the case, Perjury was first published in 1978. Now, in its latest edition, Perjury links together the old and new evidence, much of it previously undiscovered or unavailable, bringing the Hiss-Chambers’s amazing story up to the present.
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Author: Lewis Hartshorn

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN: 1476602816

Category: History

Page: 228

View: 6381

This is a consensus challenging history of the Alger Hiss–Whittaker Chambers controversy of 1948 to 1950, a criminal case in which Hiss was convicted of perjury after two long trials. Chambers claimed that Hiss had passed classified State Department documents to him in 1937 and 1938 for transmittal to the Soviet Union. Hiss denied the charges but was found guilty at his second trial (the jury could not reach a decision in the first). Hiss was not charged with espionage because of the statute of limitations. The main focus of this narrative concentrates on the early months of the affair, from August 1948 when Chambers appeared before the House Committee on Un-American Activities and denounced Hiss and several others as underground Communists, to the following December when Hiss was indicted for perjury. The truth emerges as the story unfolds, based in part on grand jury records unsealed by court order in 1999, leading to the conclusion that the stories Whittaker Chambers told the authorities and later published about himself and Alger Hiss in the Communist underground are completely fraudulent.
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The Espionage Trials that Shaped American Politics

Author: John Earl Haynes,Harvey Klehr

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1139460242

Category: History

Page: N.A

View: 2124

Communism was never a popular ideology in America, but the vehemence of American anticommunism varied from passive disdain in the 1920s to fervent hostility in the early years of the Cold War. Nothing so stimulated the white hot anticommunism of the late 1940s and 1950s more than a series of spy trials that revealed that American Communists had co-operated with Soviet espionage against the United States and had assisted in stealing the technical secrets of the atomic bomb as well as penetrating the US State Department, the Treasury Department, and the White House itself. This book, first published in 2006, reviews the major spy cases of the early Cold War (Hiss-Chambers, Rosenberg, Bentley, Gouzenko, Coplon, Amerasia and others) and the often-frustrating clashes between the exacting rules of the American criminal justice system and the requirements of effective counter-espionage.
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Author: Donald L. Smith

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 9780674966857

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 355

View: 1268

In the first biography of this distinguished American, Donald Smith portrays Chafee as temperamentally conservative, only accidentally a defender of radicals and a civil rights advocate. This perceptive intellectual biography brings to life the story of a scholar caught up in the dramatic political events of his time.
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Crimes and Trials as Media Events

Author: Lloyd Chiasson

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN: 0275959368

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 227

View: 5721

Tells the stories of sixteen famous crimes and the trials and press coverage that ensued. The trials covered range from the John Peter Zenger free speech trial in 1735 to the O. J. Simpson trial in 1995.
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Plagiarism, Fraud, and Politics in the Ivory Tower

Author: Jon Wiener

Publisher: New Press, The

ISBN: 1595588523

Category: History

Page: 260

View: 7263

Historians in Trouble is investigative journalist and historian Jon Wiener’s "incisive and entertaining" (New Statesman, UK) account of several of the most notorious history scandals of the last few years. Focusing on a dozen key controversies ranging across the political spectrum and representing a wide array of charges, Wiener seeks to understand why some cases make the headlines and end careers, while others do not. He looks at the well publicized cases of Michael Bellesiles, the historian of gun culture accused of research fraud; accused plagiarists and "celebrity historians" Stephen Ambrose and Doris Kearns Goodwin; Pulitzer Prize–winner Joseph J. Ellis, who lied in his classroom at Mount Holyoke about having fought in Vietnam; and the allegations of misconduct by Harvard’s Stephan Thernstrom and Emory’s Elizabeth Fox-Genovese, who nevertheless were appointed by George W. Bush to the National Council on the Humanities. As the Bancroft Prize–winning historian Linda Gordon wrote in Dissent, Wiener’s "very readable book . . . reveal[s] not only scholarly misdeeds but also recent increases in threats to free debate and intellectual integrity."
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Author: James Stuart Olson

Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group

ISBN: 9780313306198

Category: History

Page: 353

View: 5665

Presents essays dealing with the issues, people, movements, foreign affairs, politics, literature and intellectual life, popular culture, and events of the decade, and includes a chronology of events.
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An Honest Reporter in the Age of McCarthyism

Author: Loren Ghiglione

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231516894

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 352

View: 4568

Loren Ghiglione recounts the fascinating life and tragic suicide of Don Hollenbeck, the controversial newscaster who became a primary target of McCarthyism's smear tactics. Drawing on unsealed FBI records, private family correspondence, and interviews with Walter Cronkite, Mike Wallace, Charles Collingwood, Douglas Edwards, and more than one hundred other journalists, Ghiglione writes a balanced biography that cuts close to the bone of this complicated newsman and chronicles the stark consequences of the anti-Communist frenzy that seized America in the late 1940s and 1950s. Hollenbeck began his career at the Lincoln, Nebraska Journal (marrying the boss's daughter) before becoming an editor at William Randolph Hearst's rip-roaring Omaha Bee-News. He participated in the emerging field of photojournalism at the Associated Press; assisted in creating the innovative, ad-free PM newspaper in New York City; reported from the European theater for NBC radio during World War II; and anchored television newscasts at CBS during the era of Edward R. Murrow. Hollenbeck's pioneering, prize-winning radio program, CBS Views the Press (1947-1950), was a declaration of independence from a print medium that had dominated American newsmaking for close to 250 years. The program candidly criticized the prestigious New York Times, the Daily News (then the paper with the largest circulation in America), and Hearst's flagship Journal-American and popular morning tabloid Daily Mirror. For this honest work, Hollenbeck was attacked by conservative anti-Communists, especially Hearst columnist Jack O'Brian, and in 1954, plagued by depression, alcoholism, three failed marriages, and two network firings (and worried about a third), Hollenbeck took his own life. In his investigation of this amazing American character, Ghiglione reveals the workings of an industry that continues to fall victim to censorship and political manipulation. Separating myth from fact, CBS's Don Hollenbeck is the definitive portrait of a polarizing figure who became a symbol of America's tortured conscience.
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Author: T. Michael Ruddy

Publisher: Wadsworth Publishing Company

ISBN: 9780155085602

Category: History

Page: 252

View: 9630

Part of the American Stories Series, THE ALGER HISS ESPIONAGE CASE follows this famous espionage case from the time Whittaker Chambers, appearing before a congressional committee, accused Alger Hiss of being a member of the Communist Party to Hiss's conviction for perjury in 1950. The whole affair was arguably the most dramatic verification that Soviet espionage indeed had penetrated the U.S. government and thus gave impetus to that early Cold War phenomenon of McCarthyism. Each book in the American Stories Series is devoted to a salient event in American history. Each brings together evidence about some of those whose lives mattered in the making of our common story. And, each text enables students to use primary historical evidence to determine what actually happened, why, and how those events have shaped the course of America's story. Visit www.newtexts.com for other books in the series.
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Moskaus Geheimoperationen im Kalten Krieg

Author: Christopher M. Andrew,Vasilij N. Mitrochin

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9783549072912

Category:

Page: 878

View: 2358

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Selected Essays

Author: Whittaker Chambers

Publisher: Transaction Publishers

ISBN: 9781412824590

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 361

View: 3782

Whittaker Chambers is one of the most controversial figures in modern American history a former Communist spy who left the party, testified against Alger Hiss before the House Un-American Activities Committee, and wrote a classic autobiography, "Witness." Dismissed by some as a crank, reviled by others as a traitor, Chambers still looms as a Dostoevskian figure over three decades after his death in 1961. A man of profound pessimism, rare vision, and remarkable literary talents, his continuing importance was attested to when Ronald Reagan posthumously awarded him the Medal of Freedom in 1984. "Ghosts on the Roof," originally published in 1989, brings together more than fifty short stories, essays, articles, and reviews that originally appeared in "Time, Life, National Review, Commonweal, The American Mercury," and the New Masses. Included are essays on Karl Marx, Reinhold Niebuhr, James Joyce, Franz Kafka, George Santayana, Dame Rebecca West, Ayn Rand, and Greta Garbo. These show Chambers at his best, as a peerless historian of ideas.
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Author: Whittaker Chambers

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1621573761

Category: History

Page: 718

View: 1928

#1 New York Times bestseller for 13 consecutive weeks! First published in 1952, Witness is the true story of Soviet spies in America and the trial that captivated a nation. Part literary effort, part philosophical treatise, this intriguing autobiography recounts the famous Alger Hiss case and reveals much more. Chambers' worldview and his belief that "man without mysticism is a monster" went on to help make political conservatism a national force. Regnery History's Cold War Classics edition is the most comprehensive version of Witness ever published, featuring forewords collected from all previous editions, including discussions from luminaries William F. Buckley Jr., Robert D. Novak, Milton Hindus, and Alfred S. Regnery.
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Intelligence in the Twentieth Century

Author: Jeffery T. Richelson

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780199761739

Category: History

Page: 544

View: 8007

Here is the ultimate inside history of twentieth-century intelligence gathering and covert activity. Unrivalled in its scope and as readable as any spy novel, A Century of Spies travels from tsarist Russia and the earliest days of the British Secret Service to the crises and uncertainties of today's post-Cold War world, offering an unsurpassed overview of the role of modern intelligence in every part of the globe. From spies and secret agents to the latest high-tech wizardry in signals and imagery surveillance, it provides fascinating, in-depth coverage of important operations of United States, British, Russian, Israeli, Chinese, German, and French intelligence services, and much more. All the key elements of modern intelligence activity are here. An expert whose books have received high marks from the intelligence and military communities, Jeffrey Richelson covers the crucial role of spy technology from the days of Marconi and the Wright Brothers to today's dazzling array of Space Age satellites, aircraft, and ground stations. He provides vivid portraits of spymasters, spies, and defectors--including Sidney Reilly, Herbert Yardley, Kim Philby, James Angleton, Markus Wolf, Reinhard Gehlen, Vitaly Yurchenko, Jonathan Pollard, and many others. Richelson paints a colorful portrait of World War I's spies and sabateurs, and illuminates the secret maneuvering that helped determine the outcome of the war on land, at sea, and on the diplomatic front; he investigates the enormous importance of intelligence operations in both the European and Pacific theaters in World War II, from the work of Allied and Nazi agents to the "black magic" of U.S. and British code breakers; and he gives us a complete overview of intelligence during the length of the Cold War, from superpower espionage and spy scandals to covert action and secret wars. A final chapter probes the still-evolving role of intelligence work in the new world of disorder and ethnic conflict, from the high-tech wonders of the Gulf War to the surprising involvement of the French government in industrial espionage. Comprehensive, authoritative, and addictively readable, A Century of Spies is filled with new information on a variety of subjects--from the activities of the American Black Chamber in the 1920s to intelligence collection during the Cuban missile crisis to Soviet intelligence and covert action operations. It is an essential volume for anyone interested in military history, espionage and adventure, and world affairs.
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Brokers of Ideas and Power from FDR to LBJ

Author: Michael Janeway

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231505779

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 8541

In the 1930s a band of smart and able young men, some still in their twenties, helped Franklin D. Roosevelt transform an American nation in crisis. They were the junior officers of the New Deal. Thomas G. Corcoran, Benjamin V. Cohen, William O. Douglas, Abe Fortas, and James Rowe helped FDR build the modern Democratic Party into a progressive coalition whose command over power and ideas during the next three decades seemed politically invincible. This is the first book about this group of Rooseveltians and their linkage to Lyndon Johnson's Great Society and the Vietnam War debacle. Michael Janeway grew up inside this world. His father, Eliot Janeway, business editor of Time and a star writer for Fortune and Life magazines, was part of this circle, strategizing and practicing politics as well as reporting on these men. Drawing on his intimate knowledge of events and previously unavailable private letters and other documents, Janeway crafts a riveting account of the exercise of power during the New Deal and its aftermath. He shows how these men were at the nexus of reform impulses at the electoral level with reform thinking in the social sciences and the law and explains how this potent fusion helped build the contemporary American state. Since that time efforts to reinvent government by "brains trust" have largely failed in the U.S. In the last quarter of the twentieth century American politics ceased to function as a blend of broad coalition building and reform agenda setting, rooted in a consensus of belief in the efficacy of modern government. Can a progressive coalition of ideas and power come together again? The Fall of the House of Roosevelt makes such a prospect both alluring and daunting.
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True Stories of the Heroes and Villains Who Made America

Author: Glenn Beck

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1476787158

Category: Political Science

Page: 320

View: 7848

From #1 bestselling author and popular radio and television host Glenn Beck, the powerful follow-up to his national bestseller Miracles and Massacres, which was praised as “moving, provocative, and masterful” (Michelle Malkin, bestselling author of Culture of Corruption). Everyone has heard of a “Ponzi scheme,” but do you know what Charles Ponzi actually did to make his name synonymous with fraud? You’ve probably been to a Disney theme park, but did you know that the park Walt believed would change the world was actually EPCOT? He died before his vision for it could ever be realized. History is about so much more than dates and dead guys; it’s the greatest story ever told. Now, in Dreamers and Deceivers, Glenn Beck brings ten more true and untold stories to life. The people who made America were not always what they seemed. There were entrepreneurs and visionaries whose selflessness propelled us forward, but there were also charlatans and fraudsters whose selfishness nearly derailed us. Dreamers and Deceivers brings both of these groups to life with stories written to put you right in the middle of the action. From the spy Alger Hiss, to the visionary Steve Jobs, to the code-breaker Alan Turing—once you know the full stories behind the half-truths you’ve been force fed…once you begin to see these amazing people from our past as people rather than just names—your perspective on today’s important issues may forever change.
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The Fbi, Congress, and the Cold War

Author: Athan G. Theoharis

Publisher: Philadelphia : Temple University Press

ISBN: N.A

Category: Social Science

Page: 423

View: 6912

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Author: George Haggerty

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 113558513X

Category: Reference

Page: 986

View: 9158

First Published in 2000. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
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A Life in the Cold War

Author: Robert Beisner

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 019538248X

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 800

View: 3147

Dean Acheson was one of the most influential Secretaries of State in U.S. history, presiding over American foreign policy during a pivotal era - the decade after World War II when the American Century slipped into high gear. During his vastly influential career, Acheson spearheaded the greatest foreign policy achievements in modern times, ranging from the Marshall Plan to the establishment of NATO. Now, in this monumental biography, Robert L. Beisner paints an indelible portrait of one of the key figures of the last half-century. In a book filled with insight based on research in government archives, memoirs, letters, and diaries, Beisner illuminates Acheson's policy-making, describing how he led the state department and managed his relationship with Truman, all to illuminate the vital policies he initiated in his years at State. The book examines Acheson's major triumphs, including the highly underrated achievement of converting West Germany and Japan from mortal enemiesto prized allies, and does not shy away from examining his missteps. But underlying all his actions, Beisner shows, was a tough-minded determination to outmatch the strength of the Soviet bloc - indeed, to defeat the Soviet Union at every turn. The emotional center of the book focuses on Acheson's friendship with Truman. No pair seemed so poorly matched - one, a bourbon-drinking mid-Westerner with a homespun disposition, the other, a mustachioed Connecticut dandy who preferred perfect martinis - yet no such team ever worked better together. Acheson's unstinting dedication to an often unpopular president was reciprocated with deep gratitude and loyalty. Together, they redrew the map of the post-war world. Over six foot tall, with steel blue, "merry, searching eyes" and a "wolfish" grin, Dean Acheson was an unforgettable character - intellectually brilliant, always debonair, and tough as tempered steel. This lustrous portrait of an immensely accomplished and colorful life is the epitome of the biographer's art.
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