Author: Henrik Mouritsen

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107031885

Category: History

Page: 202

View: 9454

The politics of the Roman Republic has in recent decades been the subject of intense debate, covering issues such as the degree of democracy and popular influence, 'parties' and ideology, politics as public ritual, and the character of Rome's political culture. This engaging book examines all these issues afresh, and presents an original synthesis of Rome's political institutions and practices. It begins by explaining the development of the Roman constitution over time before turning to the practical functioning of the Republic, focusing particularly on the role of the populus Romanus and the way its powers were expressed in the popular assemblies. Henrik Mouritsen concludes by exploring continuity and change in Roman politics as well as the process by which the republican system was eventually replaced by monarchy. This original and readable book will be important for all students and scholars of Roman history and of politics in general.
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Author: Eric M. Orlin

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9780391041325

Category: Religion

Page: 227

View: 6717

The construction of a new temple in the Roman Republic was an event that illuminated key features of their political and religious systems. Building a temple was for instance a way for a victorious general to proclaim his glory and for a magistrate to higlight his prestige, but it was also a public service. This book explores this relationship between the individual and the community and analyses the formal process by which a temple came to construction; the vow, the placing of a contract and the dedication, as well as the importance of the Sibylline books, use of war booty and the role played by the senate, which Orlin argues is more significant than previously thought.
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Author: Henriette van der Blom

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1316776638

Category: History

Page: N.A

View: 8484

Oratory and Political Career in the Late Roman Republic is a pioneering investigation into political life in the late Roman Republic. It explores the nature and extent to which Roman politicians embraced oratorical performances as part of their political career and how such performances influenced the careers of individual orators such as Gaius Gracchus, Pompeius Magnus, and Julius Caesar. Through six case studies, this book presents a complex and multifaceted picture of how Roman politicians employed oratory to articulate their personal and political agendas, to present themselves to a public obsessed with individual achievement, and ultimately to promote their individual careers. By dealing specifically with orators other than Cicero, this study offers much-needed alternatives to our understanding of public oratory in Rome. Moreover, the assessment of the impact of public speeches on the development of political careers provides new perspectives on the hotly debated nature of republican political culture.
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Politics in Prose

Author: Ayelet Haimson Lushkov

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1316240029

Category: History

Page: N.A

View: 7805

The study of Roman republican magistracy has traditionally been the preserve of historians posing constitutional and prosopographical questions. As a result, one fundamental aspect of our most detailed contemporary and near-contemporary sources about magistracy has remained largely neglected: their literariness. This book takes a new approach to the representation of magistrates and shows how the rhetorical and formal features of prose texts - principally Livy's history but also works by Cicero and Sallust - shape our understanding of magistracy. Applying to the texts an expanded concept of exemplarity, Haimson Lushkov shows how a rich body of anecdotes concerning the behaviour and speech of magistrates reflects on the values and tensions that defined the republic. A variety of contexts - familial, military, and electoral, among others - flesh out the experience of being, becoming, and encountering a Roman magistrate, and the political and ethical problems highlighted and negotiated in such circumstances.
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Author: Valentina Arena

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1139620169

Category: History

Page: N.A

View: 5080

This is a comprehensive analysis of the idea of libertas and its conflicting uses in the political struggles of the late Roman Republic. By reconstructing Roman political thinking about liberty against the background of Classical and Hellenistic thought, it excavates two distinct intellectual traditions on the means allowing for the preservation and the loss of libertas. Considering the interplay of these traditions in the political debates of the first century BC, Dr Arena offers a significant reinterpretation of the political struggles of the time as well as a radical reappraisal of the role played by the idea of liberty in the practice of politics. She argues that, as a result of its uses in rhetorical debates, libertas underwent a form of conceptual change at the end of the Republic and came to legitimise a new course of politics, which led progressively to the transformation of the whole political system.
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An Ancient Political Culture and Modern Research

Author: Karl-J. Hölkeskamp,Henry Heitmann-Gordon

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 0691140383

Category: History

Page: 189

View: 2871

In recent decades, scholars have argued that the Roman Republic's political culture was essentially democratic in nature, stressing the central role of the 'sovereign' people and their assemblies. Karl-J. Hölkeskamp challenges this view in Reconstructing the Roman Republic, warning that this scholarly trend threatens to become the new orthodoxy, and defending the position that the republic was in fact a uniquely Roman, dominantly oligarchic and aristocratic political form. Hölkeskamp offers a comprehensive, in-depth survey of the modern debate surrounding the Roman Republic. He looks at the ongoing controversy first triggered in the 1980s when the 'oligarchic orthodoxy' was called into question by the idea that the republic's political culture was a form of Greek-style democracy, and he considers the important theoretical and methodological advances of the 1960s and 1970s that prepared the ground for this debate. Hölkeskamp renews and refines the 'elitist' view, showing how the republic was a unique kind of premodern city-state political culture shaped by a specific variant of a political class. He covers a host of fascinating topics, including the Roman value system; the senatorial aristocracy; competition in war and politics within this aristocracy; and the symbolic language of public rituals and ceremonies, monuments, architecture, and urban topography. Certain to inspire continued debate, Reconstructing the Roman Republic offers fresh approaches to the study of the republic while attesting to the field's enduring vitality.
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Author: Cristina Rosillo-López

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107145074

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 8579

This book investigates the working mechanisms of public opinion in Late Republican Rome as a part of informal politics. It explores the political interaction (and sometimes opposition) between the elite and the people through various means, such as rumours, gossip, political literature, popular verses and graffiti. It also proposes the existence of a public sphere in Late Republican Rome and analyses public opinion in that time as a system of control. By applying the spatial turn to politics, it becomes possible to study sociability and informal meetings where public opinion circulated. What emerges is a wider concept of the political participation of the people, not just restricted to voting or participating in the assemblies.
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Author: Fergus Millar

Publisher: UPNE

ISBN: 9781584651994

Category: History

Page: 201

View: 6586

An experienced scholar explains why the legendary early Republic, rather than the historical Republic of Cicero, has most influenced later political thought.
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Author: Nathan Rosenstein,Robert Morstein-Marx

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 1444357204

Category: History

Page: 776

View: 5809

This Companion provides an authoritative and up-to-date overview of Roman Republican history as it is currently practiced. Highlights recent developments, including archaeological discoveries, fresh approaches to textual sources, and the opening up of new areas of historical study Retains the drama of the Republic’s rise and fall Emphasizes not just the evidence of texts and physical remains, but also the models and assumptions that scholars bring to these artefacts Looks at the role played by the physical geography and environment of Italy Offers a compact but detailed narrative of military and political developments from the birth of the Roman Republic through to the death of Julius Caesar Discusses current controversies in the field
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Author: Henrik Mouritsen

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781139428668

Category: History

Page: N.A

View: 977

Plebs and Politics in the Late Roman Republic analyses the political role of the masses in a profoundly aristocratic society. Constitutionally the populus Romanus wielded almost unlimited powers, controlling legislation and the election of officials, a fact which has inspired 'democratic' readings of the Roman republic. In this book a distinction is drawn between the formal powers of the Roman people and the practical realization of these powers. The question is approached from a quantitative as well as a qualitative perspective, asking how large these crowds were, and how their size affected their social composition. Building on those investigations, the different types of meetings and assemblies are analysed. The result is a picture of the place of the masses in the running of the Roman state, which challenges the 'democratic' interpretation, and presents a society riven by social conflicts and a widening gap between rich and poor.
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Holding High Office in the Roman Republic

Author: Hans Beck,Antonio Duplá,Martin Jehne,Francisco Pina Polo

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1139497197

Category: History

Page: N.A

View: 8538

The consulate was the focal point of Roman politics. Both the ruling class and the ordinary citizens fixed their gaze on the republic's highest office - to be sure, from different perspectives and with differing expectations. While the former aspired to the consulate as the defining magistracy of their social status, the latter perceived it as the embodiment of the Roman state. Holding high office was thus not merely a political exercise. The consulate prefigured all aspects of public life, with consuls taking care of almost every aspect of the administration of the Roman state. This multifaceted character of the consulate invites a holistic investigation. The scope of this book is therefore not limited to political or constitutional questions. Instead, it investigates the predominant role of the consulate in and its impact on, the political culture of the Roman republic.
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Performing Politics in Rome Between Republic and Empire

Author: Geoffrey Sumi

Publisher: University of Michigan Press

ISBN: 0472036661

Category: History

Page: 378

View: 1683

In Ceremony and Power, Geoffrey Sumi is concerned with the relationship between political power and public ceremonial in the Roman Republic, with particular focus on the critical months following Caesar's assassination and later as Augustus became the first emperor of Rome. The book traces the use of a variety of public ceremonies, including assemblies of the people, triumphs, funerals, and games, as a means for politicians in this period of instability and transition to shape their public images and consolidate their power and prestige. Ultimately, Sumi shows that the will of the people, whether they were the electorate assembled at the comitia, the citizen body at the contio, the spectators at the theater, the crowd at the triumph, or mourners at a funeral, strongly influenced the decisions and actions of Roman aristocrats.
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Lateinisch - Deutsch

Author: Cicero

Publisher: Walter de Gruyter

ISBN: 3050061618

Category: History

Page: 1076

View: 6485

An seine Freunde - wer da Zeugnisse dessen, was wir Freundschaft nennen, erwartet, wird sich ein wenig enttäuscht finden. Abgesehen von den Briefen an seine Gattin Terentia und seine Freigelassenen Tiro, die eine Sonderstellung einnehmen, gibt sich Cicero nur einigen wenigen Partnern gegenüber ganz so, wie er ist, und das ist doch das, was wir bei einem Freund voraussetzen: Unbefangenheit und Unverstelltheit. Die große Masse seiner Briefe ist zweckgebunden, trägt mehr oder weniger formellen Charakter. Da gilt es, das eigene politische Handeln zu rechtfertigen, das persönliche Verdienst ins rechte Licht zu rücken, Differenzen mit politischen "Freunden" auszufechten, Beziehungen für sich und andere auszuwerten, den politischen Gesinnungsgenossen bei der Stange zu halten oder zu fördern und was dergleichen mehr ist. So leuchten diese Briefe tief hinein in das Treiben der führenden Kreise und bergen mit ihren Schlaglichtern auf das politische Geschehen der Zeit eine Fülle von Interessantem und Fesselndem. Ganz von der Politik diktiert ist der Briefwechsel mit L. Plancus, M. Lepidus, D. Brutus und C. Cassius in den Büchern X, XI und XII. Er bildet eine unschätzbare Quelle für unsere Kenntnis der Vorgänge während des Todeskampfes der Republik.
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Author: Tom Stevenson

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317597540

Category: History

Page: 224

View: 2272

Julius Caesar and the Transformation of the Roman Republic provides an accessible introduction to Caesar’s life and public career. It outlines the main phases of his career with reference to prominent social and political concepts of the time. This approach helps to explain his aims, ideals, and motives as rooted in tradition, and demonstrates that Caesar’s rise to power owed much to broad historical processes of the late Republican period, a view that contrasts with the long-held idea that he sought to become Rome’s king from an early age. This is an essential undergraduate introduction to this fascinating figure, and to his role in the transformation of Rome from republic to empire.
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Author: Andrew William Lintott

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN: 9780198152828

Category: History

Page: 240

View: 437

This book examines the roots of violence in Roman Republican law and society and the growth of violence in city war and the power of armies. It discusses political conflict, violence, military insurrection, and authoritarian government of the Republic.
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Author: Gordon P. Kelly

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107320771

Category: History

Page: N.A

View: 8358

Roman senators and equestrians were always vulnerable to prosecution for their official conduct, especially since politically motivated accusations were common. When charged with a crime in Republican Rome, such men had a choice concerning their fate. They could either remain in Rome and face possible conviction and punishment, or go into voluntary exile and avoid legal sentence. For the majority of the Republican period, exile was not a formal legal penalty contained in statutes, although it was the practical outcome of most capital convictions. Despite its importance in the political arena, Roman exile has been a neglected topic in modern scholarship. This 2006 study examines all facets of exile in the Roman Republic: its historical development, technical legal issues, the possibility of restoration, as well as the effects of exile on the lives and families of banished men.
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Essays on Late-Republican Politics and Literature

Author: T. P. Wiseman

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 0191617016

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 288

View: 362

In the Roman republic, only the People could pass laws, only the People could elect politicians to office, and the very word republica meant 'the People's business'. So why is it always assumed that the republic was an oligarchy? The main reason is that most of what we know about it we know from Cicero, a great man and a great writer, but also an active right-wing politician who took it for granted that what was good for a small minority of self-styled 'best people' (optimates) was good for the republic as a whole. T. P. Wiseman interprets the last century of the republic on the assumption that the People had a coherent political ideology of its own, and that the optimates, with their belief in justified murder, were responsible for the breakdown of the republic in civil war.
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Author: Robert Morstein-Marx

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781139449878

Category: History

Page: N.A

View: 9585

This book highlights the role played by public, political discourse in shaping the distribution of power between Senate and People in the Late Roman Republic. Against the background of the debate between 'oligarchical' and 'democratic' interpretations of Republican politics, Robert Morstein-Marx emphasizes the perpetual negotiation and reproduction of political power through mass communication. The book analyses the ideology of Republican mass oratory and situates its rhetoric fully within the institutional and historical context of the public meetings (contiones) in which these speeches were heard. Examples of contional orations, drawn chiefly from Cicero and Sallust, are subjected to an analysis that is influenced by contemporary political theory and empirical studies of public opinion and the media, rooted in a detailed examination of key events and institutional structures, and illuminated by a vivid sense of the urban space in which the contio was set.
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Author: Henrik Mouritsen

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1139495038

Category: History

Page: N.A

View: 9806

Freedmen occupied a complex and often problematic place in Roman society between slaves on the one hand and freeborn citizens on the other. Playing an extremely important role in the economic life of the Roman world, they were also a key instrument for replenishing and even increasing the size of the citizen body. This book presents an original synthesis, for the first time covering both Republic and Empire in a single volume. While providing up-to-date discussions of most significant aspects of the phenomenon, the book also offers a new understanding of the practice of manumission, its role in the organisation of slave labour and the Roman economy, as well as the deep-seated ideological concerns to which it gave rise. It locates the freedman in a broader social and economic context, explaining the remarkable popularity of manumission in the Roman world.
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