Author: Patrick Baert,Fernando Domínguez Rubio

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134004370

Category: Social Science

Page: 224

View: 8647

Social scientists often refer to contemporary advanced societies as ‘knowledge societies’, which indicates the extent to which ‘science’, ‘knowledge’ and ‘knowledge production’ have become fundamental phenomena in Western societies and central concerns for the social sciences. This book aims to investigate the political dimension of this production and validation of knowledge. In studying the relationship between knowledge and politics, this book provides a novel perspective on current debates about ‘knowledge societies’, and offers an interdisciplinary agenda for future research. It addresses four fundamental aspects of the relation between knowledge and politics: • the ways in which the nature of the knowledge we produce affects the nature of political activity • how the production of knowledge calls into question fundamental political categories • how the production of knowledge is governed and managed • how the new technologies of knowledge produce new forms of political action. This book will be of interest to students of sociology, political science, cultural studies and science and technology studies.
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Area Studies and the Disciplines

Author: David L. Szanton

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 9780520245365

Category: Education

Page: 425

View: 9404

The usefulness and political implications of Area Studies programs are currently debated within the Academy and the Administration, where they are often treated as one homogenous and stagnant domain of scholarship. The essays in this volume document the various fields’ distinctive character and internal heterogeneity as well as the dynamism resulting from their evolving engagements with funders, US and international politics, and domestic constituencies. The authors were chosen for their long-standing interest in the intellectual evolution of their fields. They describe the origins and histories of US-based Area Studies programs, highlighting their complex, generative, and sometimes contentious relationships with the social science and humanities disciplines and their diverse contributions to the regions of the world with which they are concerned.
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Author: Joanne Coysh

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317669606

Category: Law

Page: 211

View: 965

Around the world there are a myriad of NGOs using human rights education (HRE) as a tool of community empowerment with the firm belief that it will help people improve their lives. One way of understanding these processes is that they translate universal human rights speak using messages and symbols which make them relevant to people’s daily lives and culturally resonant. However, an alternative more radical perspective is that these processes should engage individuals in modes of critical inquiry into the ways that that existing power structures maintain the status quo and control not only how we understand and speak about social inequality and injustice, but also act on it. This book is a critical inquiry into the production, distribution and consumption of HRE and how the discourse is constructed historically, socially and politically through global institutions and local NGO practice. The book begins with the premise that HRE is composed of theories of human rights and education, both of which are complex and multifaceted. However, the book demonstrates how over time a dominant discourse of HRE, constructed by the United Nations institutional framework, has come to prominence and the ways it is reproduced and reinforced through the practice of intermediary NGOs engaged in HRE activities with community groups. Drawing on socio-legal scholarship it offers a new theoretical and political framework for addressing how human rights, pedagogy, knowledge and power can be analysed between the global and local by connecting the critical, but well-trodden, theories of human rights to insights on critical pedagogy. It uses critical discourse analysis and ethnographic research to investigate the practice of NGOs engaged in HRE using contextual evidence and findings from fieldwork with NGOs and communities in Tanzania.
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Activist Movements in Medicine and Planning

Author: Lily M. Hoffman

Publisher: SUNY Press

ISBN: 9780887069482

Category: Social Science

Page: 290

View: 4746

In this book the author examines the question of the compatibility of politics, policy-making, and professional work. Based on nineteen case studies of organizations, Hoffman looks at "what happened" as doctors and planners set out to redistribute services to minorities and the poor between 1960 and 1980.
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Author: Andrew Feenberg,Alastair Hannay

Publisher: Georgetown University Press

ISBN: 9780253209405

Category: Philosophy

Page: 288

View: 2249

Technology and the Politics of Knowledge responds to an evergrowing concern with technology in contemporary social thought. The leading figures in the current philosophical study of technology address such complex and hotly debated issues as the place of science and technical knowledge in the political sphere, the role of individual choice and citizen virtue in a technological society, the relevance of gender to technical innovation, the contributions of Habermas and Heidegger to thinking on technology, and the political and moral implications of innovation in such diverse fields as the media and reproductive technologies.
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Author: Elizabeth Rata

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1136302301

Category: Education

Page: 180

View: 2942

This book explores the decline of the teaching of epistemic, conceptual knowledge in schools, its replacement with everyday social knowledge, and its relation to changes in the division of labor within the global economy. It argues that the emphasis on social knowledge in postmodern and social constructionist pedagogy compounds the problem, and examines the consequences of these changes for educational opportunity and democracy itself.
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The Carnegie Corporation, Philanthropy, and Public Policy

Author: Ellen Condliffe Lagemann

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226467801

Category: Political Science

Page: 347

View: 1583

The Carnegie Corporation, among this country's oldest and most important foundations, has underwritten projects ranging from the writings of David Riesman to Sesame Street. Lagemann's lively history focuses on how foundations quietly but effectively use power and private money to influence public policies.
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The Politics of Knowledge in Agricultural Research

Author: James Sumberg

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1315284030

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 202

View: 3666

Over the last decade there has been renewed interest in food security and the state of the global food system. Population growth, climate change and food price spikes have combined to focus new attention on the technologies and institutions that underpin the production and consumption of food that is varied, nutritious and safe. Knowledge politics within development-oriented agronomy set the stage for some models of agricultural development to be favoured over others, with very real implications for the food security and wellbeing of many millions of people. Agronomy for Development demonstrates how the analysis of knowledge politics can shed valuable new light on current debates about agricultural development and food security. Using bio-physical and social sciences perspectives to address the political economy of the production and use of knowledge in development, this edited collection reflects on the changing politics of knowledge within the field of agronomy and the ways in which these politics feed and reflect the interests of a broad set of actors. This book is aimed at professionals working in agricultural research as well as students and practitioners of agricultural, rural and international development.
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Author: Susan Levine

Publisher: HSRC Publishers

ISBN: 9780796923929

Category: Medical

Page: 200

View: 4253

"Medicine and the Politics of Knowledge situates South Africa - including its history of stances and political formations around HIV/AIDS - in the broader context of questions relating to science, medicine, human experimentation, and structural violence, all of which shape the cases in the book. Putting South Africa in the context of other cases of contention and contestation about science and medicine in India, Latin America and China helps us to understand the particular history of the South African case itself. Conceived in response to the urgency of bioethical debates in medical anthropology, this ethnographic collection touches the borders of anthropology, philosophy, and public health"--Publisher's website.
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African Women in Imperialist Discourses

Author: Obioma Nnaemeka

Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group

ISBN: 9780897898645

Category: Social Science

Page: 288

View: 740

By exposing the colonial and imperial discourses that undergird the global debate on female circumcision, this important work creates a space for the marginalized to speak and mount their challenges and proposes strategies for creating a transnational feminist movement that fosters genuine collaboration and partnership.
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Author: Michael W. Apple,Petter Aasen

Publisher: Psychology Press

ISBN: 9780415935128

Category: Education

Page: 259

View: 2605

Michael W. Apple has assembled established and emerging scholars to show how political institutions regulate knowledge and legitimate certain versions of culture.
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Literacy Activism and the Politics of Writing in South India

Author: Francis Cody

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN: 0801469023

Category: Social Science

Page: 273

View: 7885

Since the early 1990s hundreds of thousands of Tamil villagers in southern India have participated in literacy lessons, science demonstrations, and other events designed to transform them into active citizens with access to state power. These efforts to spread enlightenment among the oppressed are part of a movement known as the Arivoli Iyakkam (the Enlightenment Movement), considered to be among the most successful mass literacy movements in recent history. In The Light of Knowledge, Francis Cody’s ethnography of the Arivoli Iyakkam highlights the paradoxes inherent in such movements that seek to emancipate people through literacy when literacy is a power-laden social practice in its own right. The Light of Knowledge is set primarily in the rural district of Pudukkottai in Tamil Nadu, and it is about activism among laboring women from marginalized castes who have been particularly active as learners and volunteers in the movement. In their endeavors to remake the Tamil countryside through literacy activism, workers in the movement found that their own understanding of the politics of writing and Enlightenment was often transformed as they encountered vastly different notions of language and imaginations of social order. Indeed, while activists of the movement successfully mobilized large numbers of rural women, they did so through logics that often pushed against the very Enlightenment rationality they hoped to foster. Offering a rare behind-the-scenes look at an increasingly important area of social and political activism, The Light of Knowledge brings tools of linguistic anthropology to engage with critical social theories of the postcolonial state.
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Author: Professor Jeremy R Youde

Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.

ISBN: 1409498131

Category: Law

Page: 166

View: 9475

Through an in-depth examination of the interactions between the South African government and the international AIDS control regime, Jeremy Youde examines not only the emergence of an epistemic community but also the development of a counter-epistemic community offering fundamentally different understandings of AIDS and radically different policy prescriptions. In addition, individuals have become influential in the crafting of the South African government's AIDS policies, despite universal condemnation from the international scientific community. This study highlights the relevance and importance of Africa to international affairs. The actions of African states call into question many of our basic assumptions and challenge us to refine our analytical framework. It is ideally suited to scholars interested in African studies, international organizations, global governance and infectious diseases.
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Authorship and the Politics of Knowledge in the Nineteenth Century

Author: Alex Csiszar

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 022655337X

Category: Science

Page: 368

View: 2226

Not since the printing press has a media object been as celebrated for its role in the advancement of knowledge as the scientific journal. From open communication to peer review, the scientific journal has long been central both to the identity of academic scientists and to the public legitimacy of scientific knowledge. But that was not always the case. At the dawn of the nineteenth century, academies and societies dominated elite study of the natural world. Journals were a relatively marginal feature of this world, and sometimes even an object of outright suspicion. The Scientific Journal tells the story of how that changed. Alex Csiszar takes readers deep into nineteenth-century London and Paris, where savants struggled to reshape scientific life in the light of rapidly changing political mores and the growing importance of the press in public life. The scientific journal did not arise as a natural solution to the problem of communicating scientific discoveries. Rather, as Csiszar shows, its dominance was a hard-won compromise born of political exigencies, shifting epistemic values, intellectual property debates, and the demands of commerce. Many of the tensions and problems that plague scholarly publishing today are rooted in these tangled beginnings. As we seek to make sense of our own moment of intense experimentation in publishing platforms, peer review, and information curation, Csiszar argues powerfully that a better understanding of the journal’s past will be crucial to imagining future forms for the expression and organization of knowledge.
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Author: Stephanie Kirk

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317052579

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 230

View: 3783

Each of the book's five chapters evokes a colonial Mexican cultural and intellectual sphere: the library, anatomy and medicine, spirituality, classical learning, and publishing and printing. Using an array of literary texts and historical documents and alongside secondary historical and critical materials, the author Stephanie Kirk demonstrates how Sor Juana used her poetry and other works to inscribe herself within the discourses associated with these cultural institutions and discursive spheres and thus challenge the male exclusivity of their precepts and precincts. Kirk illustrates how Sor Juana subverted the masculine character of erudition, writing herself into an all-male community of scholars. From there, Sor Juana clearly questions the gender politics at play in her exclusion, and undermines what seems to be the inextricable link previously forged between masculinity and institutional knowledge. Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz and the Gender Politics of Knowledge in Colonial Mexico opens up new readings of her texts through the lens of cultural and intellectual history and material culture in order to shed light on the production of knowledge in the seventeenth-century colonial Mexican society of which she was both a product and an anomaly.
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Work and Politics in Science and Technology

Author: Susan Leigh Star

Publisher: SUNY Press

ISBN: 9780791425657

Category: Social Science

Page: 421

View: 852

This collection of articles provides a comprehensive overview of personal and public issues related to social change and how they shape scientific and technical knowledge.
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Essays on the History and Politics of Knowledge

Author: Frederick Cooper,Randall M. Packard

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 9780520209572

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 361

View: 3570

"This superb collection assembles a number of stimulating and theoretically current contributions by outstanding scholars."--Angelique Haugerud, author of The Culture of Politics in Modern Kenya
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Author: Daniel Innerarity

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing USA

ISBN: 1623560330

Category: Political Science

Page: 224

View: 7174

This volume in the Political Theory and Contemporary Philosophy series extends democracy to knowledge in two ways. First, it argues that the issues science seeks to clarify are relevant for all citizens. Second, it explains that the fundamental problems faced by any democracy, such as the economic crisis, are not so much problems of political will as cognitive failures that must be resolved through both a greater knowledge of the realities over which we govern and a fine-tuning of the tools of governance. In fact, knowledge and related fields are spheres in which not only economic prosperity, but also democratic quality, are determined. Thus politics of knowledge and through knowledge has become a question of democratic citizenship. After introducing the concept of governing knowledge, the book discusses the political action of collective organization of uncertainty, before developing the idea of the cognitive challenge of the economy, revealed by today's economic crisis. A groundbreaking work by a renowned philosopher, it will be an accessible and fundamental resource for anyone interested in the relation of power to knowledge.
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The Commercialization of the University, the Professions, and Print Culture

Author: Richard Ohmann

Publisher: Wesleyan University Press

ISBN: 9780819565907

Category: Education

Page: 292

View: 3423

Cultural analysis of the American university system.
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