Author: Richard Duncan-Jones

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107149797

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 240

View: 4444

Explores the impact of social standing on the careers of senators and knights in the Roman Empire.
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Die tausendjährige Geschichte Roms

Author: Mary Beard

Publisher: S. Fischer Verlag

ISBN: 3104031444

Category: History

Page: 656

View: 594

Wer hätte gedacht, dass Alte Geschichte so spannend und gegenwärtig sein kann? – Ein neuer Blick auf das alte Rom! Unkonventionell, scharfsinnig und zugleich akademisch versiert – dies trifft nicht nur auf die hochrenommierte Althistorikerin und Cambridge-Professorin Mary Beard selbst zu, sondern auch auf ihre neue große Geschichte des Römischen Reichs und seiner Bewohner: SPQR - Die tausendjährige Geschichte Roms. Begeistert erzählt sie die Geschichte eines Weltreichs, lässt uns Kriege, Exzesse, Intrigen miterleben, aber auch den römischen Alltag – wie Ärger in den Mietshäusern und Ciceros Scheidung. Sie lässt uns hinter die Legenden und Mythen blicken, hinterfragt sicher Geglaubtes und kommt zu überraschenden Einsichten. So erscheint Rom ganz nah – in seinen Debatten über Integration und Migration – und dann doch auch faszinierend fern, wenn es etwa um Sklaverei geht. Die Geschichte Roms für unsere Zeit. In prächtiger Ausstattung, mit über hundert s/w Abbildungen und umfangreichem farbigen Bildteil. »Bahnbrechend [...], anregend [...], revolutionär [...] ein völlig neuer Zugang zur Alten Geschichte.« Spectator »Aufregend, psychologisch scharfsinnig sowie mitfühlend kritisch.« Sunday Times »Meisterhaft [...], diese große Geschichte Roms erweckt die ferne Vergangenheit grandios zum Leben.« The Economist »Ungemein packend [...] ebenso unterhaltsam wie gelehrt.« Observer »Wer hätte gedacht, dass Geschichte so spannend sein kann?« Independent
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Abridged Edition

Author: Edward Gibbon

Publisher: Modern Library

ISBN: 0307419762

Category: History

Page: 1312

View: 3770

Edited, abridged, and with a critical Foreword by Hans-Friedrich Mueller Introduction by Daniel J. Boorstin Illustrations by Giovanni Battista Piranesi Edward Gibbon’s masterpiece, which narrates the history of the Roman Empire from the second century A.D. to its collapse in the west in the fifth century and in the east in the fifteenth century, is widely considered the greatest work of history ever written. This abridgment retains the full scope of the original, but in a breadth comparable to a novel. Casual readers now have access to the full sweep of Gibbon’s narrative, while instructors and students have a volume that can be read in a single term. This unique edition emphasizes elements ignored in all other abridgments—in particular the role of religion in the empire and the rise of Islam.
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Author: Stanley E. Porter,Cynthia Long Westfall

Publisher: Wipf and Stock Publishers

ISBN: 1630877328

Category: Religion

Page: 320

View: 6215

How does a Christian render unto Caesar what is Caesar's, and unto God what is God's? This book is the result of the Bingham Colloquium of 2007 that brought scholars from across North America to examine the New Testament's response to the empires of God and Caesar. Two chapters lay the foundation for that response in the Old Testament's concept of empire, and six others address the response to the notion of empire, both human and divine, in the various authors of the New Testament. A final chapter investigates how the church fathers regarded the matter. The essays display various methods and positions; together, however, they offer a representative sample of the current state of study of the notion of empire in the New Testament.
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State Formation in the South Scandinavian Iron Age

Author: Tina L. Thurston

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 0306471841

Category: Social Science

Page: 326

View: 4461

Tina Thurston’s Landscapes of Power; Landscapes of Conflict is a thi- generation processual analysis of sociopolitical evolution during the Iron Age in southern Scandinavia. Several red flags seem to be raised at once. Are not archaeologists now postprocessual, using new interpretive approaches to - derstand human history? Is not evolution a discredited concept in which - cieties are arbitrarily arranged along a unilinear scheme? Should not modern approaches be profoundly historical and agent-centered? In any event, were not Scandinavians the ultimate barbarian Vikings parasitizing the complex civilized world of southern and central Europe? Tina Thurston’s book focuses our attention on the significant innovations of anthropological archaeology at the end of the twentieth century. A brief overview of processual archaeology can set the context for - preciating Landscapes ofPower; Landscapes of Conflict. During the 1960s the emergent processual archaeology (a. k. a. the New Archaeology) cryst- lized an evolutionary paradigm that framed research with the comparative ethnography of Service and Fried. It was thought that human societies p- gressed through stages of social development and that the goal was to d- cover the evolutionary prime movers (such as irrigation, warfare, trade, and population) that drove social and cultural change. By the 1970s prime movers had fallen from favor and social evolution was conceived as complicated flows of causation involving many variables.
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Author: Erhun Kula

Publisher: Psychology Press

ISBN: 9780415133890

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 235

View: 501

This volume presents the ideas of major figures in economics throughout history on key environmental issues such as population growth, resource scarcity and environmental contamination. Throughout, the historical roots of current debates are explored with empirical case studies illustrating the link between theory and practice. The final chapters look at current ideas on sustainability, and ethical and spiritual dimensions of humanity's relationship with the environment. Providing fascinating insight into the development of environmental economic thought, this volume will be of great interest to students and researchers in the history of economic thought and environmental economics.
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Exposing White Power and Privilege

Author: George Jerry Sefa Dei,Leeno Luke Karumanchery,Nisha Karumanchery

Publisher: Peter Lang

ISBN: 9780820467528

Category: Social Science

Page: 224

View: 4421

"Playing the Race Card" reflects and engages the dynamic nature of racialized experience in Western contexts. It examines today's anti-racism project to discern how it might benefit from integrating strategies that work toward the development of critical consciousness as its main goal. So that the privileged and the oppressed alike may reflexively examine their own subject positions, this book identifies and addresses the need to develop a working model for anti-racism strategies. Given the need to understand and move beyond static conceptions of race and racism, "Playing the Race Card" offers both a critique of mainstream/privileged perceptions of racial oppression, as well as a direction forward within a more -organic- approach to social reform."
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From the Time of Jul. Caesar to that of Vitellius, from the Time of Vespasian to the Extinction of the Western Empire

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category:

Page: N.A

View: 5152

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The Influence of Secular Ethics and Social Change

Author: Bruce W. Winter

Publisher: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing

ISBN: 9780802848987

Category: History

Page: 344

View: 8398

Winter (divinity, U. of Cambridge) is not concerned about where Paul went from there, but about what happened in Corinth after he was gone. He gathers all the extant material he can find from literary, nonliterary, and archaeological sources on what life was like in the first-century Roman colony, f
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Carmen Christi as Cursus Pudorum

Author: Joseph H. Hellerman

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781139446419

Category: Religion

Page: N.A

View: 1102

This book examines Paul's letter to the Philippians against the social background of the colony at Philippi. After an extensive survey of Roman social values, Professor Hellerman argues that the cursus honorum, the formalized sequence of public offices that marked out the prescribed social pilgrimage for aspiring senatorial aristocrats in Rome (and which was replicated in miniature in municipalities and in voluntary associations), forms the background against which Paul has framed his picture of Jesus in the great Christ hymn in Philippians 2. In marked contrast to the values of the dominant culture, Paul portrays Jesus descending what the author describes as a cursus pudorum ('course of ignominies'). The passage has thus been intentionally framed to subvert Roman cursus ideology and, by extension, to redefine the manner in which honour and power were to be utilized among the Christians at Philippi.
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