Refugees and the Political Crisis of Our Time

Author: David Miliband

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1501154400

Category: Political Science

Page: 160

View: 6955

We are in the midst of a global refugee crisis. Sixty five million people are fleeing for their lives. The choices are urgent, not just for them but for all of us. What can we possibly do to help? With compassion and clarity, David Miliband shows why we should care and how we can make a difference. He takes us from war zones in the Middle East to peaceful suburbs in America to explain the crisis and show what can be done, not just by governments with the power to change policy but by citizens with the urge to change lives. His innovative and practical call to action shows that the crisis need not overwhelm us. Miliband says this is a fight to uphold the best of human nature in the face of rhetoric and policy that humor the worst. He defends the international order built by western leaders out of the ashes of World War II, but says now is the time for reform. Describing his family story and drawing revealing lessons from his life in politics, David Miliband shows that if we fail refugees, then we betray our own history, values, and interests. The message is simple: rescue refugees and we rescue ourselves.
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Rethinking Refugee Policy in a Changing World

Author: Paul Collier,Alexander Betts

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0190659173

Category: Political Science

Page: 256

View: 9917

Global refugee numbers are at their highest levels since the end of World War II, but the system in place to deal with them, based upon a humanitarian list of imagined "basic needs," has changed little. In Refuge, Paul Collier and Alexander Betts argue that the system fails to provide a comprehensive solution to the fundamental problem, which is how to reintegrate displaced people into society. Western countries deliver food, clothing, and shelter to refugee camps, but these sites, usually located in remote border locations, can make things worse. The numbers are stark: the average length of stay in a refugee camp worldwide is 17 years. Into this situation comes the Syria crisis, which has dislocated countless families, bringing them to face an impossible choice: huddle in dangerous urban desolation, rot in dilapidated camps, or flee across the Mediterranean to increasingly unwelcoming governments. Refuge seeks to restore moral purpose and clarity to refugee policy. Rather than assuming indefinite dependency, Collier-author of The Bottom Billion-and his Oxford colleague Betts propose a humanitarian approach integrated with a new economic agenda that begins with jobs, restores autonomy, and rebuilds people's ability to help themselves and their societies. Timely and urgent, the book goes beyond decrying scenes of desperation to declare what so many people, policymakers and public alike, are anxious to hear: that a long-term solution really is within reach.
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Author: Alan Lightman

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1501154370

Category: Psychology

Page: 128

View: 1191

In this timely and essential book that offers a fresh take on the qualms of modern day life, Professor Alan Lightman investigates the creativity born from allowing our minds to freely roam, without attempting to accomplish anything and without any assigned tasks. We are all worried about wasting time. Especially in the West, we have created a frenzied lifestyle in which the twenty-­four hours of each day are carved up, dissected, and reduced down to ten minute units of efficiency. We take our iPhones and laptops with us on vacation. We check email at restaurants or our brokerage accounts while walking in the park. When the school day ends, our children are overloaded with “extras.” Our university curricula are so crammed our young people don’t have time to reflect on the material they are supposed to be learning. Yet in the face of our time-driven existence, a great deal of evidence suggests there is great value in “wasting time,” of letting the mind lie fallow for some periods, of letting minutes and even hours go by without scheduled activities or intended tasks. Gustav Mahler routinely took three or four-­hour walks after lunch, stopping to jot down ideas in his notebook. Carl Jung did his most creative thinking and writing when he visited his country house. In his 1949 autobiography, Albert Einstein described how his thinking involved letting his mind roam over many possibilities and making connections between concepts that were previously unconnected. With In Praise of Wasting Time, Professor Alan Lightman documents the rush and heave of the modern world, suggests the technological and cultural origins of our time-­driven lives, and examines the many values of “wasting time”—for replenishing the mind, for creative thought, and for finding and solidifying the inner self. Break free from the idea that we must not waste a single second, and discover how sometimes the best thing to do is to do nothing at all.
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Author: David Miliband

Publisher: Polity

ISBN: 9780745613918

Category: Political Science

Page: 264

View: 6400

In this important new book a remarkable group of authors - academics, journalists and politicians - offer a radical reappraisal of the future of Left political theory and policy in the context of recent changes in society. Compiled by the Institute for Public Policy Research, the volume includes contributons by Anthony Giddens, Perry Anderson, Gordon Brown, Anne Phillips, Michel Rocart, David Marquand and Will Hutton among others and sets out many new ideas and concepts.
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Author: David Rothkopf

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 150111994X

Category: Psychology

Page: 128

View: 3042

With the world at the threshold of profound changes, the question becomes: Where are the philosophers? Where are the great thinkers of today? Where is the next Jefferson, Curie, or Mandela? Which technologies and changes in the nature of life will they harness, embrace, or be inspired by? As the world's center of gravity has shifted over the centuries from Europe and then to the US, so too has the center of intellectual gravity. With that center shifting to Asia and also to the emerging world, will those places produce the transformational thinkers of the twenty-first century? Embarking on an around-the-world search, David Rothkopf strives to answer these questions, uncovering what the next big ideas are and where they're emerging. Who are the people behind the ideas, and how they will be colored by their place and culture of origins?
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One Refugee's Incredible Story of Love, Loss, and Survival

Author: Melissa Fleming

Publisher: Flatiron Books

ISBN: 125010601X

Category: Social Science

Page: 288

View: 3395

"Urgently required reading." —People "Deeply affecting... Fleming brings a moral urgency to the narrative." —The New Yorker "Fleming deftly illustrates the pain of those who choose to leave Syria...and her book is ultimately a story of hope." —Newsweek Adrift in a frigid sea, no land in sight, just debris from the ship's wreckage and floating corpses all around, nineteen-year-old Doaa Al Zamel stays afloat on a small inflatable ring and clutches two little girls—barely toddlers—to her body. The children had been thrust into Doaa's arms by their drowning relatives, all refugees who boarded a dangerously overcrowded ship bound for Italy and a new life. For days as Doaa drifts, she prays for rescue and sings to the babies in her arms. She must stay alive for them. She must not lose hope. A Hope More Powerful Than the Sea chronicles the life of Doaa, a Syrian girl whose life was upended in 2011 by the onset of her country's brutal civil war. Doaa and her fiance, Bassem, decide to flee to Europe to seek safety and an education, but four days after setting sail on a smuggler's dilapidated fishing vessel along with five hundred other refugees, their boat is struck and begins to sink. This is the moment when Doaa's struggle for survival really begins. This emotionally charged, eye-opening true story that represents the millions of unheard voices of refugees who risk everything in a desperate search for the promise of a safe future. In the midst of the most pressing international humanitarian crisis of our time, Melissa Fleming paints a vivid, unforgettable portrait of the triiumph of the human spirit.
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The Munk Debates

Author: Louise Arbour,Simon Schama,Nigel Farage,Mark Steyn

Publisher: House of Anansi

ISBN: 1487002130

Category: Political Science

Page: 112

View: 9898

The world is facing the worst humanitarian crisis since the Second World War. Over 300,000 are dead in Syria, and one and half million are either injured or disabled. Four and a half million people are trying to flee the country. And Syria is just one of a growing number of failed or failing states in the Middle East and North Africa. How should developed nations respond to human suffering on this mass scale? Do the prosperous societies of the West, including Canada and the U.S., have a moral imperative to assist as many refugees as they reasonably and responsibly can? Or, is this a time for vigilance and restraint in the face of a wave of mass migration that risks upending the tolerance and openness of the West? The eighteenth semi-annual Munk Debate, which was held on April 1, 2016, pits former UN High Commissioner for Human Rights Louise Arbour and leading historian Simon Schama against leader of the UK Independence Party Nigel Farage and bestselling author Mark Steyn to debate the West’s response to the global refugee crisis.
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Adventure and Discovery in the Amazon

Author: Andrés Ruzo

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1501119486

Category: Nature

Page: 144

View: 4188

In this exciting adventure mixed with amazing scientific study, a young, exuberant explorer and geoscientist journeys deep into the Amazon—where rivers boil and legends come to life. When Andrés Ruzo was just a small boy in Peru, his grandfather told him the story of a mysterious legend: There is a river, deep in the Amazon, which boils as if a fire burns below it. Twelve years later, Ruzo—now a geoscientist—hears his aunt mention that she herself had visited this strange river. Determined to discover if the boiling river is real, Ruzo sets out on a journey deep into the Amazon. What he finds astounds him: In this long, wide, and winding river, the waters run so hot that locals brew tea in them; small animals that fall in are instantly cooked. As he studies the river, Ruzo faces challenges more complex than he had ever imaged. The Boiling River follows this young explorer as he navigates a tangle of competing interests—local shamans, illegal cattle farmers and loggers, and oil companies. This true account reads like a modern-day adventure, complete with extraordinary characters, captivating plot twists, and jaw-dropping details—including stunning photographs and a never-before-published account about this incredible natural wonder. Ultimately, though, The Boiling River is about a man trying to understand the moral obligation that comes with scientific discovery —to protect a sacred site from misuse, neglect, and even from his own discovery.
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Progress and Challenges for Children Worldwide

Author: Mark Ensalaco,Linda C. Majka

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 9780742529885

Category: Political Science

Page: 278

View: 1513

Childrens human rights are regularly violated around the world. Child soldiers, child slavery, and child prostitution are some of the more graphic examples this books deals with, but hungry, sick, and orphaned children are equally at risk and more prevalent. In the United States, children suffer similar abuses, but some are unique to the United States justice system. Unlike most of the rest of the world, the U.S. is a well-developed western nation in which juvenile offenders can be tried as adults and subjected to capital punishment. This book brings together a wide array of original essays from a variety of academic and practitioner perspectives on human rights and the status of children. The details are disturbing the message, powerful We must vigorously extend the universal declaration of human rights to the most vulnerable humans of all--the children of the world, starting at home in the United States.
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The Story of the International Rescue Committee

Author: Aaron Levenstein

Publisher: Praeger Pub Text

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 338

View: 5418

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Author: Lidia Yuknavitch

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1501120069

Category: Body, Mind & Spirit

Page: 120

View: 7376

The author explores the status of being a misfit as something to be embraced, and social misfits as being individuals of value who have a place in society, in a work that encourages people who have had difficulty finding their way to pursue their goals.
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Why Writing Well Matters

Author: Harold Evans

Publisher: Little, Brown

ISBN: 031643230X

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 416

View: 476

*New York Times Bestseller * One of NPR's Best Books of 2017 A wise and entertaining guide to writing English the proper way by one of the greatest newspaper editors of our time. Harry Evans has edited everything from the urgent files of battlefield reporters to the complex thought processes of Henry Kissinger. He's even been knighted for his services to journalism. In DO I MAKE MYSELF CLEAR?, he brings his indispensable insight to us all in his definite guide to writing well. The right words are oxygen to our ideas, but the digital era, with all of its TTYL, LMK, and WTF, has been cutting off that oxygen flow. The compulsion to be precise has vanished from our culture, and in writing of every kind we see a trend towards more--more speed and more information but far less clarity. Evans provides practical examples of how editing and rewriting can make for better communication, even in the digital age. DO I MAKE MYSELF CLEAR? is an essential text, and one that will provide every writer an editor at his shoulder.
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Author: Peter Gatrell

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199674167

Category: History

Page: 312

View: 3942

Offers a comprehensive history of global population displacement in the twentieth century, and provides a new analytic approach to the subject by exploring its causes, consequences, and meanings
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The Extraordinary Story of One Ordinary Woman and the Children She Saves

Author: Jessica Yu

Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

ISBN: 0544617061

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 384

View: 1605

The fascinating and joyful story of Gladys Kalibbala, a Ugandan "orphan sleuth," who works to connect missing and castaway children to their families
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Author: William Maley

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0190694734

Category: Social Science

Page: N.A

View: 7061

With the arrival in Europe of over a million refugees and asylum seekers in 2015, a sense of panic began to spread within the continent and beyond. What is a Refugee? puts these developments into historical context, injecting much-needed objectivity and nuance into contemporary debates over what is to be done. Refugees have been with us for a long time -- although only after the Great War did refugee movements commence on a large scale -- and are ultimately symptoms of the failure of the system of states to protect all who live within it. Providing a terse user's guide to the complex legal status of refugees, Maley argues that states are now reaping the consequences of years of attempts to block access to asylum through safe and 'legal' means. He shows why many mooted 'solutions' to the 'problem' of refugees -- from military intervention to the warehousing of refugees in camps -- are counterproductive, creating environments ripe for the growth of extremism among people who have been denied all hope. In a globalised world, he concludes, wealthy states have the resources to protect refugees. And, as his historical account shows, courageous individuals have treated refugees in the past with striking humanity. States today could do worse than emulate them.
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The Story of Europe's Refugee Crisis

Author: Patrick Kingsley

Publisher: Guardian Faber Publishing

ISBN: 9781783351060

Category: Europe

Page: 384

View: 6708

Europe is facing a wave of migration unmatched since the end of World War II - and no one has reported on this crisis in more depth or breadth than the Guardian's migration correspondent, Patrick Kingsley. Throughout 2015, Kingsley travelled to 17 countries along the migrant trail, meeting hundreds of refugees making epic odysseys across deserts, seas and mountains to reach the holy grail of Europe. This is Kingsley's unparalleled account of who these voyagers are. It's about why they keep coming, and how they do it. It's about the smugglers who help them on their way, and the coastguards who rescue them at the other end. The volunteers that feed them, the hoteliers that house them, and the border guards trying to keep them out. And the politicians looking the other way.
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Forced Displacement and Development

Author: Alexander Betts,Louise Bloom,Josiah Kaplan,Naohiko Omata

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0198795688

Category:

Page: 288

View: 2160

Refugees have rarely been studied by economists. Despite some pioneering research on the economic lives of refugees, there remains a lack of theory and empirical data through which to understand, and build upon, refugees' own engagement with markets. Yet, understanding these economic systems may hold the key to rethinking our entire approach to refugee assistance. If we can improve our knowledge of the resource allocation systems that shape refugees' lives and opportunities, then we may be able to understand the mechanisms through which these market-based systems can be made to work better and turn humanitarian challenges into sustainable opportunities. This book adopts an inter-disciplinary approach, based on original qualitative and quantitative data on the economic life of refugees, in order to begin to build theory on the economic lives of refugees. It focuses on the case of Uganda because it represents a relatively positive case. Unlike other governments in the region, it has taken the positive step to allow refugees the right to work and a significant degree of freedom of movement through it so-called 'Self-Reliance Strategy'. This allows a unique opportunity to explore what is possible when refugees have basic economic freedoms. The book shows that refugees have complex and varied economic lives, often being highly entrepreneurial and connected to the global economy. The implications are simple but profound: far from being an inevitable burden, refugees have the capacity to help themselves and contribute to their host societies - if we let them
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Christian Contemplation Through the Centuries-an Illustrated Guide

Author: Kim Nataraja

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781570759383

Category: Religion

Page: 428

View: 8595

A comprehensive, fully illustrated overview of Christian spirituality from Jesus up to the present day. The contemplative tradition in Christianity traces its origins back to Mt. Carmel, the prophet Elijah's mountain-top place of encounter with divine power. In the Gospels, we frequently read that Jesus withdrew to quiet places to pray. These biblical precedents have inspired a tradition of contemplation through the centuries and this remarkable book reveals the life and teachings of the great spiritual teachers and Christian mystics, including St. John, Origen, St. Benedict, Julian of Norwich, St. John of the Cross, Meister Eckhart, and modern-day mystics like Thomas Merton, Simone Weil, Etty Hillesum, Bede Griffiths, and John Main. The contributors themselves offer an array of leading spiritual writers, including Laurence Freeman, Esther de Waal, Kallistos Ware, Shirley du Boulay, and many more.
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Confronting the Refugee Crises of the 1990s

Author: Sadako N. Ogata

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN: 9780393057737

Category: Political Science

Page: 402

View: 1365

The United Nations high commissioner for refugees during the 1990s traces her career experiences and the lessons she learned during one of the twentieth century's greatest refugee crises, discussing issues related to protection and humanitarian assistance and the global and political climate in which humanitarian organizations operate. 15,000 first printing.
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Nine Lives in the World's Largest Refugee Camp

Author: Ben Rawlence

Publisher: Picador

ISBN: 1250067642

Category: History

Page: 400

View: 4871

To the charity workers, Dabaab refugee camp is a humanitarian crisis; to the Kenyan government, it is a 'nursery for terrorists'; to the western media, it is a dangerous no-go area; but to its half a million residents, it is their last resort. Situated hundreds of miles from any other settlement, deep within the inhospitable desert of northern Kenya where only thorn bushes grow, Dadaab is a city like no other. Its buildings are made from mud, sticks or plastic, its entire economy is grey, and its citizens survive on rations and luck. Over the course of four years, Ben Rawlence became a first-hand witness to a strange and desperate limbo-land, getting to know many of those who have come there seeking sanctuary. Among them are Guled, a former child soldier who lives for football; Nisho, who scrapes an existence by pushing a wheelbarrow and dreaming of riches; Tawane, the indomitable youth leader; and schoolgirl Kheyro, whose future hangs upon her education. In City of Thorns, Rawlence interweaves the stories of nine individuals to show what life is like in the camp and to sketch the wider political forces that keep the refugees trapped there. Rawlence combines intimate storytelling with broad socio-political investigative journalism, doing for Dadaab what Katherinee Boo's Behind the Beautiful Forevers did for the Mumbai slums. Lucid, vivid and illuminating, City of Thorns is an urgent human story with deep international repercussions, brought to life through the people who call Dadaab home.
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