The Impoverishment of Political Discourse

Author: Mary Ann Glendon

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1439108684

Category: Political Science

Page: 236

View: 8338

Political speech in the United States is undergoing a crisis. Glendon's acclaimed book traces the evolution of the strident language of rights in America and shows how it has captured the nation's devotion to individualism and liberty, but omitted the American traditions of hospitality and care for the community.
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How the Crisis in the Legal Profession is Transforming American Society

Author: Mary Ann Glendon

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 9780674601383

Category: Law

Page: 331

View: 1109

Offering a guided tour through the maze of the late-twentieth-century legal world, in which even lawyers themselves can lose their bearings, Glendon depicts the legal profession as a system in turbulence, where a variety of beliefs and ideals are vying for dominance. "Glendon's analysis has historical depth and ideologial subtlety".--Publishers Weekly. 8 illustrations.
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How Scholars and Politicians Have Imagined the World, from Plato to Eleanor Roosevelt

Author: Mary Ann Glendon

Publisher: OUP USA

ISBN: 0199782458

Category: History

Page: 261

View: 5193

The relationship between politics and the academy has been fraught with tension and regret - and the occasional brilliant success - since Plato himself. This book examines thinkers who have collaborated with leaders, from ancient Syracuse to the modern White House, in a series of brisk portraits that explore the meeting of theory and reality.
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How New Conceptions of Race, Family, and Religion Ended the Reagan Era

Author: John White

Publisher: University of Michigan Press

ISBN: 0472021796

Category: Political Science

Page: 305

View: 2130

"White's Barack Obama's America eloquently captures both the important nuances of the current political scene and its long-term consequences." ---Richard Wirthlin, former pollster for Ronald Reagan "This delightfully written and accessible book is the best available account of the changes in culture, society, and politics that have given us Barack Obama's America." ---Stan Greenberg, pollster for Bill Clinton and Chairman and CEO of Greenberg Quinlan Rosner Research "From one of the nation's foremost experts on how values shape our politics, a clear and compelling account of the dramatic shifts in social attitudes that are transforming American political culture. White's masterful blend of narrative and data illuminates the arc of electoral history from Reagan to Obama, making a powerful case for why we are entering a new progressive political era." ---Matthew R. Kerbel, Professor of Political Science, Villanova University, and author of Netroots "John Kenneth White is bold. He asks the big questions . . . Who are we? What do we claim to believe? How do we actually live? What are our politics? John Kenneth White writes compellingly about religion and the role it played in making Barack Obama president. White's keen insight into America's many faiths clarifies why Barack Obama succeeded against all odds. It is a fascinating description of religion and politics in twenty-first-century America---a must-read." ---Kathleen Kennedy Townsend, former Lieutenant Governor of Maryland and author of Failing America's Faithful "In Barack Obama's America, John Kenneth White has written the political equivalent of Baedeker or Michelin, the definitive guide to and through the new, uncharted political landscape of our world. White captures and explains what America means---and what it means to be an American---in the twenty-first century." ---Mark Shields, nationally syndicated columnist and political commentator for PBS NewsHour "John White has always caught important trends in American politics that others missed. With his shrewd analysis of why Barack Obama won, he's done it again." ---E. J. Dionne, Jr., Senior Fellow, Brookings Institution, and University Professor in the Foundations of Democracy and Culture at Georgetown University The election of Barack Obama to the presidency marks a conclusive end to the Reagan era, writes John Kenneth White in Barack Obama's America. Reagan symbolized a 1950s and 1960s America, largely white and suburban, with married couples and kids at home, who attended church more often than not. Obama's election marks a new era, the author writes. Whites will be a minority by 2042. Marriage is at an all-time low. Cohabitation has increased from a half-million couples in 1960 to more than 5 million in 2000 to even more this year. Gay marriages and civil unions are redefining what it means to be a family. And organized religions are suffering, even as Americans continue to think of themselves as a religious people. Obama's inauguration was a defining moment in the political destiny of this country, based largely on demographic shifts, as described in Barack Obama's America. John Kenneth White is Professor of Politics at the Catholic University of America in Washington, D.C. Cover image: "Out of many, we are one: Dare to Hope: Faces from 2008 Obama Rallies" by Anne C. Savage, view and buy full image at http://revolutionaryviews.com/obama_poster.html.
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Author: Mary Ann Glendon

Publisher: Sapientia Press

ISBN: 9781932589245

Category: Religion

Page: 471

View: 311

Mary Ann Glendon is the Learned Hand Professor of Law at Harvard Law School. She is the President of the Pontifical Academy of Social Sciences and led the Holy See's Delegation to the Fourth World Conference on Women. A brilliant legal theorist and the author of numerous books, here she sets forth her key insights on a range of the most pressing topcis facing human societies today.
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Pay Equity Reform and the Politics of Legal Mobilization

Author: Michael W. McCann

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226555720

Category: Law

Page: 358

View: 9973

What role has litigation played in the struggle for equal pay between women and men? In Rights at Work, Michael W. McCann explains how wage discrimination battles have raised public legal consciousness and helped reform activists mobilize working women in the pay equity movement over the past two decades. Rights at Work explores the political strategies in more than a dozen pay equity struggles since the late 1970s, including battles of state employees in Washington and Connecticut, as well as city employees in San Jose and Los Angeles. Relying on interviews with over 140 union and feminist activists, McCann shows that, even when the courts failed to correct wage discrimination, litigation and other forms of legal advocacy provided reformers with the legal discourse—the understanding of legal rights and their constraints—for defining and advancing their cause. Rights at Work offers new insight into the relation between law and social change—the ways in which grass roots social movements work within legal rights traditions to promote progressive reform.
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A History of American Distrust of Government

Author: Garry Wills

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1439128790

Category: History

Page: 368

View: 5231

In A Necessary Evil, Pulitzer Prize-winning author Garry Wills shows that distrust of government is embedded deep in the American psyche. From the revolt of the colonies against king and parliament to present-day tax revolts, militia movements, and debates about term limits, Wills shows that American antigovernment sentiment is based on a fundamental misunderstanding of our history. By debunking some of our fondest myths about the Founding Fathers, the Constitution, and the taming of the frontier, Wills shows us how our tendency to hold our elected government in disdain is misguided.
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Eleanor Roosevelt and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights

Author: Mary Ann Glendon

Publisher: Random House

ISBN: 9780375506925

Category: History

Page: 368

View: 5339

A World Made New tells the dramatic story of the struggle to build, out of the trauma and wreckage of World War II, a document that would ensure it would never happen again. There was an almost religious intensity to the project, championed by Eleanor Roosevelt under the aegis of the newly formed United nations and brought into being by an extraordinary group of men and women who knew, like the framers of the Declaration of Independence, that they were making history. They worked against the clock, the brief window between the end of World War II and the deep freeze of the cold war, to forget the founding document of the modern rights movement. A distinguished professor of international law, Mary Ann Glendon was given exclusive access to personal diaries and unpublished memoirs of key participants. An outstanding work of narrative history, A World Made New is the first book devoted to this crucial moment in Eleanor Roosevelt's life and in world history.
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State, Law, and Family in the United States and Western Europe

Author: Mary Ann Glendon

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226299709

Category: Law

Page: 336

View: 6827

Mary Ann Glendon offers a comparative and historical analysis of rapid and profound changes in the legal system beginning in the 1960s in England, France, West Germany, Sweden, and the United States, while bringing new and insightful interpretation and critical thought to bear on the explosion of legislation in the last decade. "Glendon is generally acknowledged to be the premier comparative law scholar in the area of family law. This volume, which offers an analytical survey of the changes in family law over the past twenty-five years, will burnish that reputation. Essential reading for anyone interested in evaluating the major changes that occurred in the law of the family. . . . [And] of serious interest to those in the social sciences as well."—James B. Boskey, Law Books in Review "Poses important questions and supplies rich detail."—Barbara Bennett Woodhouse, Texas Law Review "An impressive scholarly documentation of the legal changes that comprise the development of a conjugally-centered family system."—Debra Friedman, Contemporary Sociology "She has painted a portrait of the family in which we recognize not only ourselves but also unremembered ideological forefathers. . . . It sends our thoughts out into unexpected adventures."—Inga Markovits, Michigan Law Review
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Author: J. M. Balkin

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 0674058747

Category: History

Page: 298

View: 8827

Political constitutions are compromises with injustice. What makes the U.S. Constitution legitimate is Americans’ faith that the constitutional system can be made “a more perfect union.” Balkin argues that the American constitutional project is based in hope and a narrative of shared redemption, and its destiny is still over the horizon.
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Sources of Competence, Character, and Citizenship in American Society

Author: Mary Ann Glendon,David Blankenhorn

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Family & Relationships

Page: 297

View: 9216

Focuses on the role families need to play and the importance of values in the U.S.
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Author: James E. Moliterno,Fredric I. Lederer

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781594607929

Category: Law

Page: 226

View: 6366

In this newly updated volume, Moliterno and Lederer take a fresh and innovative look at the subject of law and what law study and the practice of law entail by combining a traditional academic viewpoint with elements of law practice and ethics as it continues to be widely used in orientation and introductory courses. The American legal system can be hard to understand. Going to law school is both difficult and anxiety-producing. Introduction to Law is designed to help in both areas. Written by two highly-experienced legal educators at America's oldest law school, Introduction to Law provides the reader with a written equivalent of William & Mary Law School's famous introductory law school week. Often light-hearted, this useful and pragmatic book combines an innovative introduction to the American legal system with material on how to read and understand court cases and, critically, the lawyer's interaction with the client. All too often, legal texts ignore people, especially the client whose need for legal advice first engages the legal system. The text shows the reader how a lawyer must ascertain facts and goals from a client and then apply what the new lawyer (or law student) has learned about law and its interpretation to solve the client's problem. Revised in 2010 to be fresher, more readable, and more timely in its current events references, Introduction to Law is an ideal book for a soon-to-be law student or for anyone who wants a better understanding of how our legal system and lawyers function.
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Can Courts Bring About Social Change? Second Edition

Author: Gerald N. Rosenberg

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226726687

Category: Political Science

Page: 534

View: 4165

In follow-up studies, dozens of reviews, and even a book of essays evaluating his conclusions, Gerald Rosenberg’s critics—not to mention his supporters—have spent nearly two decades debating the arguments he first put forward in The Hollow Hope. With this substantially expanded second edition of his landmark work, Rosenberg himself steps back into the fray, responding to criticism and adding chapters on the same-sex marriage battle that ask anew whether courts can spur political and social reform. Finding that the answer is still a resounding no, Rosenberg reaffirms his powerful contention that it’s nearly impossible to generate significant reforms through litigation. The reason? American courts are ineffective and relatively weak—far from the uniquely powerful sources for change they’re often portrayed as. Rosenberg supports this claim by documenting the direct and secondary effects of key court decisions—particularly Brown v. Board of Education and Roe v. Wade. He reveals, for example, that Congress, the White House, and a determined civil rights movement did far more than Brown to advance desegregation, while pro-choice activists invested too much in Roe at the expense of political mobilization. Further illuminating these cases, as well as the ongoing fight for same-sex marriage rights, Rosenberg also marshals impressive evidence to overturn the common assumption that even unsuccessful litigation can advance a cause by raising its profile. Directly addressing its critics in a new conclusion, The Hollow Hope, Second Edition promises to reignite for a new generation the national debate it sparked seventeen years ago.
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Author: Mary Ann Glendon

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 9780674001619

Category: Law

Page: 197

View: 6173

Compares U.S. laws on divorce and abortion with those in twenty Western nations and suggests improvements to current American practices.
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Ideological Republicans and Group Interest Democrats

Author: David A. Hopkins

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0190626607

Category: Party affiliation

Page: 416

View: 4692

Why do Republican politicians promise to rein in government, only to face repeated rebellions from Republican voters and media critics for betraying their principles? Why do Democratic politicians propose an array of different policies to match the diversity of their supporters, only to become mired in stark demographic divisions over issue priorities? In short, why do the two parties act so differently-whether in the electorate, on the campaign trail, or in public office? Asymmetric Politics offers a comprehensive explanation: The Republican Party is the vehicle of an ideological movement while the Democratic Party is a coalition of social groups. Republican leaders prize conservatism and attract support by pledging loyalty to broad values. Democratic leaders instead seek concrete government action, appealing to voters' group identities and interests by endorsing specific policies. This fresh and comprehensive investigation reveals how Democrats and Republicans think differently about politics, rely on distinct sources of information, argue past one another, and pursue divergent goals in government. It provides a rigorous new understanding of contemporary polarization and governing dysfunction while demonstrating how longstanding features of American politics and public policy reflect our asymmetric party system.
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Transforming the Global Political and Economic Order

Author: Penelope Deutscher,Cristina Lafont

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 023154362X

Category: Philosophy

Page: 304

View: 3903

We live in critical times. We face a global crisis in economics and finance, a global ecological crisis, and a constant barrage of international disputes. Perhaps most dishearteningly, there seems to be little faith in our ability to address such difficult problems. However, there is also a more positive sense in which these are critical times. The world's current state of flux gives us a unique window of opportunity for shaping a new international order that will allow us to cope with current and future global crises. In Critical Theory in Critical Times, eleven of the most distinguished critical theorists offer new perspectives on recent crises and transformations of the global political and economic order. Essays from Jürgen Habermas, Seyla Benhabib, Cristina Lafont, Rainer Forst, Wendy Brown, Christoph Menke, Nancy Fraser, Rahel Jaeggi, Amy Allen, Penelope Deutscher, and Charles Mills address pressing issues including international human rights and democratic sovereignty, global neoliberalism, novel approaches to the critique of capitalism, critical theory's Eurocentric heritage, and new directions offered by critical race theory and postcolonial studies. Sharpening the conceptual tools of critical theory, the contributors to Critical Theory in Critical Times reveal new ways of expanding the diverse traditions of the Frankfurt School in response to some of the most urgent and important challenges of our times.
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Author: Michael Ignatieff

Publisher: House of Anansi

ISBN: 0887848923

Category: Political Science

Page: 192

View: 7318

With an updated preface by the author. Since the proclamation of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights in 1948, rights have become the dominant language of the public good around the globe. Indeed, rights have become the trump card in every argument. Long-standing fights for aboriginal rights, the issue of preserving the linguistic heritage of minorities, and same-sex marriage have steered our society into a full-blown rights revolution. This revolution is not only deeply controversial in North America, but is being watched around the world. Are group rights jeopardizing individual rights? When everyone asserts their rights, what happens to responsibilities? Can families survive and prosper when each member has rights? Is rights language empowering individuals while weakening community? Michael Ignatieff confronts these controversial questions head-on in The Rights Revolution, defending the supposed individualism of rights language against all comers. For Ignatieff, believing in rights means believing in politics, believing in deliberation rather than confrontation, compromise rather than violence.
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Author: James Bowman

Publisher: ReadHowYouWant.com

ISBN: 1458778096

Category:

Page: 176

View: 5436

Although there is widespread acknowledgment that the mainstream media is in crisis - a crisis underscored as much by declining authority as declining circulation and viewership - no one has explained its intellectual and moral causes. James Bowman' media critic for The New Criterion' provides a scintillating and fast - paced anatomy of the mainstream media self - generated demise. In Media Madness' Bowman looks behind the headlines to examine mainstream media's governing myths. Writing with acerbic wit' he shows how the mainstream media's embrace of a spurious notion of objectivity combined with its addiction to scandal' moral equivalence' and an unshakable conviction of its own moral superiority have done irreparable damage to the media's public authority and have helped precipitate a worldwide exodus to the blogosphere and other sources of news and comment.
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Author: James E. Fleming,Linda C McClain

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 0674070747

Category: Law

Page: 383

View: 5811

Fleming and McClain defend a civic liberalism that takes seriously not just rights but responsibilities and virtues. Issues taken up include same-sex marriage, reproductive freedom, regulation of civil society and the family, education of children, and clashes between First Amendment freedoms of association and religion and antidiscrimination law.
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Four Inquiries

Author: Michael J. Perry

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 9780195138283

Category: Political Science

Page: 176

View: 2221

Inspired by a 1988 trip to El Salvador, Michael J. Perry's new book is a personal and scholarly exploration of the idea of human rights. Perry is one of our nation's leading authorities on the relation of morality, including religious morality, to politics and law. He seeks, in this book, to disentangle the complex idea of human rights by way of four probing and interrelated essays. * The initial essay, which is animated by Perry's skepticism about the capacity of any secular morality to offer a coherent account of the idea of human rights, suggests that the first part of the idea of human rights--the premise that every human being is "sacred" or "inviolable"--is inescapably religious. * Responding to recent criticism of "rights talk", Perry explicates, in his second essay, the meaning and value of talk about human rights. * In his third essay, Perry asks a fundamental question about human rights: Are they universal? In addressing this question, he disaggregates and criticizes several different varieties of "moral relativism" and then considers the implications of these different relativist positions for claims about human rights. * Perry turns to another fundamental question about human rights in his final essay: Are they absolute? He concludes that even if no human rights, understood as moral rights, are absolute or unconditional, some human rights, understood as international legal rights, are--and indeed, should be--absolute. In the introduction, Perry writes: "Of all the influential--indeed, formative--moral ideas to take center stage in the twentieth century, like democracy and socialism, the idea of human rights (which, again, in one form or another, is an old idea) is, for many, the most difficult. It is the most difficult in the sense that it is, for many, the hardest of the great moral ideas to integrate, the hardest to square, with the reigning intellectual assumptions of the age, especially what Bernard Williams has called 'Nietzsche's thought': 'There is not only no God, but no metaphysical order of any kind....' For those who accept 'Nietzsche's thought', can the idea of human rights possibly be more than a kind of aesthetic preference? In a culture in which it was widely believed that there is no God or metaphysical order of any kind, on what basis, if any, could the idea of human rights long survive?" The Idea of Human Rights: Four Inquiries will appeal to students of many disciplines, including (but not limited to) law, philosophy, religion, and politics.
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