Author: Andrew M. Riggsby

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 052168711X

Category: History

Page: 283

View: 8166

In this book, Andrew Riggsby surveys the main areas of Roman law, and their place in Roman life.
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Author: Andrew M. Riggsby

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1139489348

Category: History

Page: N.A

View: 8473

In this book, Andrew Riggsby offers a survey of the main areas of Roman law, both substantive and procedural, and how the legal world interacted with the rest of Roman life. Emphasising basic concepts, he recounts its historical development and focuses in particular on the later Republic and early centuries of the Roman Empire. The volume is designed as an introductory work, with brief chapters that will be accessible to college students with little knowledge of legal matters or Roman antiquity. The text is also free of technical language and Latin terminology. It can be used in courses on Roman law, Roman history, or comparative law, but it will also serve as a useful reference for more advanced students and scholars.
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Author: Andrew M. Riggsby

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521867517

Category: History

Page: 283

View: 2170

In this book, Andrew Riggsby surveys the main areas of Roman law, and their place in Roman life.
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Author: Peter Stein

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521643795

Category: History

Page: 137

View: 8312

This is a short and succinct summary of the unique position of Roman law in European culture by one of the world's leading legal historians. Peter Stein's masterly study assesses the impact of Roman law in the ancient world, and its continued unifying influence throughout medieval and modern Europe. Roman Law in European History is unparalleled in lucidity and authority, and should prove of enormous utility for teachers and students (at all levels) of legal history, comparative law and European Studies. Award-winning on its appearance in German translation, this English rendition of a magisterial work of interpretive synthesis is an invaluable contribution to the understanding of perhaps the most important European legal tradition of all.
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Author: David Johnston

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521895642

Category: History

Page: 552

View: 9309

This book reflects the wide range of current scholarship on Roman law, covering private, criminal and public law.
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Author: Jill Harries

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1316582957

Category: History

Page: N.A

View: 1354

What was crime in ancient Rome? Was it defined by law or social attitudes? How did damage to the individual differ from offences against the community as a whole? This book explores competing legal and extra-legal discourses in a number of areas, including theft, official malpractice, treason, sexual misconduct, crimes of violence, homicide, magic and perceptions of deviance. It argues that court practice was responsive to social change, despite the ingrained conservatism of the legal tradition, and that judges and litigants were in part responsible for the harsher operation of justice in Late Antiquity. Consideration is also given to how attitudes to crime were shaped not only by legal experts but also by the rhetorical education and practices of advocates, and by popular and even elite indifference to the finer points of law.
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The Condition of the Slave in Private Law from Augustus to Justinian

Author: William Warwick Buckland

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Persons (Roman law)

Page: 735

View: 3480

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Author: David Johnston

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781139425803

Category: History

Page: N.A

View: 9827

Roman Law in Context explains how Roman law worked for those who lived by it, by viewing it in the light of the society and economy in which it operated. The book discusses three main areas of Roman law and life: the family and inheritance; property and the use of land; commercial transactions and the management of businesses. It also deals with the question of litigation and how readily the Roman citizen could assert his or her legal rights in practice. In addition it provides an introduction to using the main sources of Roman law. The book ends with an epilogue discussing the role of Roman law in medieval and modern Europe, a bibliographical essay, and a glossary of legal terms. The book involves the minimum of legal technicality and is intended to be accessible to students and teachers of Roman history as well as interested general readers.
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Past, Present, and Future

Author: Thomas McGinn

Publisher: University of Michigan Press

ISBN: 047202857X

Category: History

Page: 367

View: 9070

Long a major element of classical studies, the examination of the laws of the ancient Romans has gained momentum in recent years as interdisciplinary work in legal studies has spread. Two resulting issues have arisen, on one hand concerning Roman laws as intellectual achievements and historical artifacts, and on the other about how we should consequently conceptualize Roman law. Drawn from a conference convened by the volume's editor at the American Academy in Rome addressing these concerns and others, this volume investigates in detail the Roman law of obligations—a subset of private law—together with its subordinate fields, contracts and delicts (torts). A centuries-old and highly influential discipline, Roman law has traditionally been studied in the context of law schools, rather than humanities faculties. This book opens a window on that world. Roman law, despite intense interest in the United States and elsewhere in the English-speaking world, remains largely a continental European enterprise in terms of scholarly publications and access to such publications. This volume offers a collection of specialist essays by leading scholars Nikolaus Benke, Cosimo Cascione, Maria Floriana Cursi, Paul du Plessis, Roberto Fiori, Dennis Kehoe, Carla Masi Doria, Ernest Metzger, Federico Procchi, J. Michael Rainer, Salvo Randazzo, and Bernard Stolte, many of whom have not published before in English, as well as opening and concluding chapters by editor Thomas A. J. McGinn.
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Author: Clifford Ando

Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

ISBN: 0812204883

Category: History

Page: 184

View: 799

The Romans depicted the civil law as a body of rules crafted through communal deliberation for the purpose of self-government. Yet, as Clifford Ando demonstrates in Law, Language, and Empire in the Roman Tradition, the civil law was also an instrument of empire: many of its most characteristic features developed in response to the challenges posed when the legal system of Rome was deployed to embrace, incorporate, and govern people and cultures far afield. Ando studies the processes through which lawyers at Rome grappled with the legal pluralism resulting from imperial conquests. He focuses primarily on the tools—most prominently analogy and fiction—used to extend the system and enable it to regulate the lives of persons far from the minds of the original legislators, and he traces the central place that philosophy of language came to occupy in Roman legal thought. In the second part of the book Ando examines the relationship between civil, public, and international law. Despite the prominence accorded public and international law in legal theory, it was civil law that provided conceptual resources to those other fields in the Roman tradition. Ultimately it was the civil law's implication in systems of domination outside its own narrow sphere that opened the door to its own subversion. When political turmoil at Rome upended the institutions of political and legislative authority and effectively ended Roman democracy, the concepts and language that the civil law supplied to the project of Republican empire saw their meanings transformed. As a result, forms of domination once exercised by Romans over others were inscribed in the workings of law at Rome, henceforth to be exercised by the Romans over themselves.
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Author: Alan Watson

Publisher: University of Georgia Press

ISBN: 9780820312613

Category: Law

Page: 328

View: 5369

Provides a comprehensive description of the system of Roman law, discussing slavery, property, contracts, delicts and succession. Also examines the ways in which Roman law influenced later legal systems such as the structure of European legal systems, tort law in the French civil code, differences between contract law in France and Germany, parameters of judicial reasoning, feudal law, and the interests of governments in making and communicating law.
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Author: Clifford Ando,Paul J du Plessis,Kaius Tuori

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0191044423

Category: History

Page: 650

View: 4478

The Handbook is intended to survey the landscape of contemporary research and chart principal directions of future inquiry. Its aim is to bring to bear upon Roman legal study the full range of intellectual resources of contemporary legal history, from comparison to popular constitutionalism, from international private law to law and society. This unique contribution of the volumesets it apart from others in the field. Furthermore, the volume brings the study of Roman law into closer alignment, and thus into dialogue, with historical, sociological, and anthropological research in law in other periods. The volume is therefore directed not simply to ancient historians and legal historians already focused on the ancient world, but to historians of all periods interested in law and its complex and multifaceted relationship to society.
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Author: Richard P. Saller

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521599788

Category: History

Page: 249

View: 1547

This innovative study of the patriarchy belies the accepted notion of the father figure as tyrannical and exploitative.
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Homicide and Power in the Roman Republic

Author: Judy E. Gaughan

Publisher: University of Texas Press

ISBN: 0292721110

Category: History

Page: 194

View: 1377

Embarking on a unique study of Roman criminal law, Judy Gaughan has developed a novel understanding of the nature of social and political power dynamics in republican government. Revealing the significant relationship between political power and attitudes toward homicide in the Roman republic, Murder Was Not a Crime describes a legal system through which families (rather than the government) were given the power to mete out punishment for murder. With implications that could modify the most fundamental beliefs about the Roman republic, Gaughan's research maintains that Roman criminal law did not contain a specific enactment against murder, although it had done so prior to the overthrow of the monarchy. While kings felt an imperative to hold monopoly over the power to kill, Gaughan argues, the republic phase ushered in a form of decentralized government that did not see itself as vulnerable to challenge by an act of murder. And the power possessed by individual families ensured that the government would not attain the responsibility for punishing homicidal violence. Drawing on surviving Roman laws and literary sources, Murder Was Not a Crime also explores the dictator Sulla's "murder law," arguing that it lacked any government concept of murder and was instead simply a collection of earlier statutes repressing poisoning, arson, and the carrying of weapons. Reinterpreting a spectrum of scenarios, Gaughan makes new distinctions between the paternal head of household and his power over life and death, versus the power of consuls and praetors to command and kill.
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Author: Paul du Plessis

Publisher: A&C Black

ISBN: 1472503058

Category: History

Page: 128

View: 8295

Studying Roman Law is an introductory guide aimed at sixth-formers, students and those with a general interest wishing to obtain a basic overview of Roman private law during the first three centuries of the Common Era. It is not meant to be a replacement for more comprehensive and technical manuals on Roman law, but should rather be seen as introductory reading. Written in non-specialist language, it contains a basic overview of the sources of Roman private law and a guide to their use together with a survey of the main areas of the law using primary sources in translation. It also explains the different contexts in which these rules arose and operated as well as the mechanisms by which they were enforced against the backdrop of one of the most sophisticated and influential legal systems of the ancient world.
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Author: Jill Harries

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521422734

Category: History

Page: 246

View: 1826

The first systematic historical treatment in English of public law in the later Roman Empire.
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Author: Paul du Plessis

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 0198736223

Category: Law

Page: 440

View: 2615

Borkowski's Textbook on Roman Law is the leading textbook in the field of Roman law, and has been written with undergraduate students firmly in mind. The book provides an accessible and highly engaging account of Roman private law and civil procedure, with coverage of all key topics, including the Roman legal system, and the law of persons, property, and obligations. The author sets the law in its social and historical context, and demonstrates the impact of Roman law on our modern legal systems. For the fifth edition, Paul du Plessis has included references to a wide range of scholarly texts, to ground his judicious account of Roman law firmly in contemporary scholarship. He has also added examples from legal practice, as well as truncated timelines at the start of each chapter to illustrate how the law developed over time. The book contains a wealth of learning features, including chapter summaries, diagrams and maps. A major feature of the book is the inclusion throughout of extracts in translation from the most important sources of Roman law: the Digest and the Institutes of Justinian. Annotated further reading sections at the end of each chapter act as a guide to further enquiry. Online Resource Centre The book is accompanied by an extensive Online Resource Centre, containing the following resources: -Self-test multiple choice questions -Interactive timeline -Biographies of key figures -Glossary of Latin terms -Annotated web links -Original Latin versions of the extracts from the Digest and the Institutes of Justinian -Examples of textual analysis of Roman law texts -Guide to the literature and sources of Roman law
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An Historical Introduction

Author: Hans Julius Wolff

Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press

ISBN: 9780806112961

Category: Political Science

Page: 260

View: 5511

One of the great and lasting influences on the course of Western culture, Roman law occupies a unique place in the history of the civilized world. Originally the law of a small rural community, then of a powerful city-state, it became the law of an empire which embraced almost all of the known civilized world. The influence of Roman law extends into modern times and is reflected in the great codifications of private law that have come into existence in Europe, America, and Asia. Even now, Roman law in modified form is the law of the land in Scotland, and the civil code of Louisiana is directly based on Roman law. Forming an important part in the historical and intellectual background of understanding and a basis for further development of the principles of international jurisprudence. In this book an international authority on Roman legal history sets forth in clear, understandable English the institutions of Roman law and traces their development through the Byzantine Empire into medieval and modern Europe. It is an indispensable study for every American lawyer and for anyone interesting in legal and political history.
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Author: John Anthony Crook

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN: 9780801492730

Category: History

Page: 349

View: 2620

It is about Roman law in its social context, an attempt to strengthen the bridge between two spheres of discourse about ancient Rome by using the institutions of the law to enlarge understanding of the society and bringing the evidence of the social and economic facts to bear on the rules of law.
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