Author: Benjamin Straumann

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107092906

Category: History

Page: 283

View: 9024

Offers a new interpretation of the foundations of Hugo Grotius' highly influential doctrine of natural law and natural rights.
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Author: Thomas Hobbes

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9783866474116

Category:

Page: 336

View: 6683

Thomas Hobbes Leviathan ist das Sinnbild unumschränkter und unteilbarer staatlicher Macht- Der Mensch, von Natur aus ein egoistisches und auf Selbsterhaltung bedachtes Wesen, findet die Sicherheit des Zusammenlebens allein in der Institution des Staates. Das 1651 erschienene Meisterwerk des einflussreichen englischen Denkers wurde besonders im 20.Jahrhundert viel diskutiert und ist bis heute Inspirationsquelle der modernen Staatstheorie.
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oder Die Grundsätze des Staatsrechtes

Author: Jean-Jacques Rousseau

Publisher: BoD – Books on Demand

ISBN: 3954550539

Category: Philosophy

Page: 108

View: 7648

Mit seiner 1762 veröffentlichten Abhandlung übte der französische Philosoph Jean-Jacques Rousseau einen wesentlichen Einfluss auf die politische Theorie der Französischen Revolution aus, zugleich sind seine radikalen Schlussfolgerungen bis heute umstritten: Im Zentrum des Buchs steht die These, dass zwischen den Individuen der Gesellschaft ein unausgesprochener Gesellschaftsvertrag existiert. Orientiert ist dieser Vertrag jedoch nicht an den Rechten des Einzelnen. Vielmehr dient der Vertrag ausschließlich dem Gemeinwohl, das in Rousseaus Augen das zugleich Vernünftige und deshalb allein Gerechte ist.
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Author: Jean Domat

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Civil law

Page: N.A

View: 2921

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Author: Yuval Noah Harari

Publisher: DVA

ISBN: 364110498X

Category: History

Page: 528

View: 7884

Krone der Schöpfung? Vor 100 000 Jahren war der Homo sapiens noch ein unbedeutendes Tier, das unauffällig in einem abgelegenen Winkel des afrikanischen Kontinents lebte. Unsere Vorfahren teilten sich den Planeten mit mindestens fünf weiteren menschlichen Spezies, und die Rolle, die sie im Ökosystem spielten, war nicht größer als die von Gorillas, Libellen oder Quallen. Vor 70 000 Jahren dann vollzog sich ein mysteriöser und rascher Wandel mit dem Homo sapiens, und es war vor allem die Beschaffenheit seines Gehirns, die ihn zum Herren des Planeten und zum Schrecken des Ökosystems werden ließ. Bis heute hat sich diese Vorherrschaft stetig zugespitzt: Der Mensch hat die Fähigkeit zu schöpferischem und zu zerstörerischem Handeln wie kein anderes Lebewesen. Anschaulich, unterhaltsam und stellenweise hochkomisch zeichnet Yuval Harari die Geschichte des Menschen nach und zeigt alle großen, aber auch alle ambivalenten Momente unserer Menschwerdung.
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The Politics, Practices, and Poetics of Mobile Media

Author: Barbara A. Crow,Kim Sawchuk,Michael Longford

Publisher: University of Toronto Press

ISBN: 0802098932

Category: History

Page: 228

View: 9382

Bringing together visual artists, designers, activists, and communication and humanities scholars to reflect on mobile media, this collection investigates these new forms of community and communication practices as they are emerging in Canada and around the world and asks how this new technology transfigures subjectivities. creating new forms of social behaviour and provocative aesthetic practices. The essays in The Wireless Spectrum range from discussions of the historical antecedents of wireless communication, users and the changing dynamics of public and private space, to the issues of access and local engagement. --Book Jacket.
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Author: Peter Stein

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1139427873

Category: History

Page: 148

View: 6614

This is a short and succinct summary of the unique position of Roman law in European culture by one of the world's leading legal historians. Peter Stein's masterly study assesses the impact of Roman law in the ancient world, and its continued unifying influence throughout medieval and modern Europe. Roman Law in European History is unparalleled in lucidity and authority, and should prove of enormous utility for teachers and students (at all levels) of legal history, comparative law and European Studies. Award-winning on its appearance in German translation, this English rendition of a magisterial work of interpretive synthesis is an invaluable contribution to the understanding of perhaps the most important European legal tradition of all.
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With Notes Shewing in Some Principal Cases Amongst Other Observations, how the Canon Law, the Laws of England, and the Laws and Customs of Other Nations Differ from it

Author: Thomas Wood

Publisher: The Lawbook Exchange, Ltd.

ISBN: 1584776870

Category: History

Page: 414

View: 7532

Reprint of the third edition. It was common during the eighteenth century to promote the study of Roman and comparative law for its liberalizing effect on the student of the common law. Wood's New Institute was the best attempt to promote this goal. It went through four editions in 1704, 1712, 1721 and 1730 and was the standard Anglo-American treatise of the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries and a well-thumbed reference for jurists who wished to add an element of civilian learning to their work, such as Joseph Story. Wood also considers its role as an auxiliary to English law. As the title suggests, it is not only a summary of Roman law adapted to the needs of students of English law, but also a pioneering essay in comparative law. Wood pays some attention as well to Roman law's influence on the historical development of English law. Indeed, he observes that "Fleta and Bracton would look very naked if every Roman lawyer should pluck away his [sic] feathers" (ix).
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Non-legislative Codifications in Historical and Comparative Perspective

Author: Nils Jansen

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 0199588767

Category: Law

Page: 175

View: 9474

From 'Justinian's Institutes' and 'Blackstone's Commentaries' to modern examples such as the 'American Law Institute's Restatements', this book offers the first comparative analysis of non-legislative codifications.
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Author: John Hurd

Publisher: Applewood Books

ISBN: 1429015179

Category: History

Page: 668

View: 488

The Making of the Modern Law: Legal Treatises, 1800-1926 includes over 20,000 analytical, theoretical and practical works on American and British Law. It includes the writings of major legal theorists, including Sir Edward Coke, Sir William Blackstone, James Fitzjames Stephen, Frederic William Maitland, John Marshall, Joseph Story, Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr. and Roscoe Pound, among others. Legal Treatises includes casebooks, local practice manuals, form books, works for lay readers, pamphlets, letters, speeches and other works of the most influential writers of their time. It is of great value to researchers of domestic and international law, government and politics, legal history, business and economics, criminology and much more.++++The below data was compiled from various identification fields in the bibliographic record of this title. This data is provided as an additional tool in helping to insure edition identification: ++++Harvard Law School Libraryocm18606066Boston: Little, Brown, 1858-1862. 2 v.; 23 cm.
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Author: Charles de Secondat baron de Montesquieu

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Jurisprudence

Page: 513

View: 7453

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Author: Alan Watson

Publisher: University of Georgia Press

ISBN: 0820330612

Category: Law

Page: 241

View: 6880

This book is not about the rules or concepts of Roman law, says Alan Watson, but about the values and approaches, explicit and implicit, of those who made the law. The scope of Watson's concerns encompasses the period from the Twelve Tables, around 451 B.C., to the end of the so-called classical period, around A.D. 235. As he discusses the issues and problems that faced the Roman legal intelligentsia, Watson also holds up Roman law as a clear, although admittedly extreme, example of law's enormous impact on society in light of society's limited input into law. Roman private law has been the most admired and imitated system of private law in the world, but it evolved, Watson argues, as a hobby of gentlemen, albeit a hobby that carried social status. The jurists, the private individuals most responsible for legal development, were first and foremost politicians and (in the Empire) bureaucrats; their engagement with the law was primarily to win the esteem of their peers. The exclusively patrician College of Pontiffs was given a monopoly on interpretation of private law in the mid fifth century B.C. Though the College would lose its exclusivity and monopoly, interpretation of law remained one mark of a Roman gentleman. But only interpretation of the law, not conceptualization or systematization or reform, gave prestige, says Watson. Further, the jurists limited themselves to particular modes of reasoning: no arguments to a ruling could be based on morality, justice, economic welfare, or what was approved elsewhere. No praetor (one of the elected officials who controlled the courts) is famous for introducing reforms, Watson points out, and, in contrast with a nonjurist like Cicero, no jurist theorized about the nature of law. A strong characteristic of Roman law is its relative autonomy, and isolation from the rest of life. Paradoxically, this very autonomy was a key factor in the Reception of Roman Law--the assimilation of the learned Roman law as taught at the universities into the law of the individual territories of Western Europe.
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