Author: Andrew M. Riggsby

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 052168711X

Category: History

Page: 283

View: 5421

In this book, Andrew Riggsby surveys the main areas of Roman law, and their place in Roman life.
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Author: Jane F. Gardner

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134930267

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 9088

The legal situation of the women of ancient Rome was extremely complex, and - since there was no sharp distinction between free woman, freedwoman and slave - the definition of their legal position is often heard. Basing her lively analysis on detailed study of literary and epigraphic material, Jane F. Gardner explores the provisions of the Roman laws as they related to women. Dr Gardner describes the ways in which the laws affected women throughout their lives - in families, as daughters, wives and parents; as heiresses and testators; as owners and controllers of property; and as workers. She looks with particular attention at the ways in which the strict letter of the law came to be modified, softened, circumvented, and even changed, pointing out that the laws themselves tell us as much about the economic situation of women and the range of opportunities available to them outside the home.
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Author: Peter Stein

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521643795

Category: History

Page: 137

View: 7228

This is a short and succinct summary of the unique position of Roman law in European culture by one of the world's leading legal historians. Peter Stein's masterly study assesses the impact of Roman law in the ancient world, and its continued unifying influence throughout medieval and modern Europe. Roman Law in European History is unparalleled in lucidity and authority, and should prove of enormous utility for teachers and students (at all levels) of legal history, comparative law and European Studies. Award-winning on its appearance in German translation, this English rendition of a magisterial work of interpretive synthesis is an invaluable contribution to the understanding of perhaps the most important European legal tradition of all.
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Mechanisms of Development

Author: A. Arthur Schiller

Publisher: Walter de Gruyter

ISBN: 311080719X

Category: History

Page: 644

View: 7779

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Author: David Johnston

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781139425803

Category: History

Page: N.A

View: 2299

Roman Law in Context explains how Roman law worked for those who lived by it, by viewing it in the light of the society and economy in which it operated. The book discusses three main areas of Roman law and life: the family and inheritance; property and the use of land; commercial transactions and the management of businesses. It also deals with the question of litigation and how readily the Roman citizen could assert his or her legal rights in practice. In addition it provides an introduction to using the main sources of Roman law. The book ends with an epilogue discussing the role of Roman law in medieval and modern Europe, a bibliographical essay, and a glossary of legal terms. The book involves the minimum of legal technicality and is intended to be accessible to students and teachers of Roman history as well as interested general readers.
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Author: Alan Watson

Publisher: University of Georgia Press

ISBN: 9780820312613

Category: Law

Page: 328

View: 6565

Provides a comprehensive description of the system of Roman law, discussing slavery, property, contracts, delicts and succession. Also examines the ways in which Roman law influenced later legal systems such as the structure of European legal systems, tort law in the French civil code, differences between contract law in France and Germany, parameters of judicial reasoning, feudal law, and the interests of governments in making and communicating law.
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Past, Present, and Future

Author: Thomas McGinn

Publisher: University of Michigan Press

ISBN: 047202857X

Category: History

Page: 367

View: 8659

Long a major element of classical studies, the examination of the laws of the ancient Romans has gained momentum in recent years as interdisciplinary work in legal studies has spread. Two resulting issues have arisen, on one hand concerning Roman laws as intellectual achievements and historical artifacts, and on the other about how we should consequently conceptualize Roman law. Drawn from a conference convened by the volume's editor at the American Academy in Rome addressing these concerns and others, this volume investigates in detail the Roman law of obligations—a subset of private law—together with its subordinate fields, contracts and delicts (torts). A centuries-old and highly influential discipline, Roman law has traditionally been studied in the context of law schools, rather than humanities faculties. This book opens a window on that world. Roman law, despite intense interest in the United States and elsewhere in the English-speaking world, remains largely a continental European enterprise in terms of scholarly publications and access to such publications. This volume offers a collection of specialist essays by leading scholars Nikolaus Benke, Cosimo Cascione, Maria Floriana Cursi, Paul du Plessis, Roberto Fiori, Dennis Kehoe, Carla Masi Doria, Ernest Metzger, Federico Procchi, J. Michael Rainer, Salvo Randazzo, and Bernard Stolte, many of whom have not published before in English, as well as opening and concluding chapters by editor Thomas A. J. McGinn.
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Author: Paul du Plessis

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 0198736223

Category: Law

Page: 440

View: 9041

Borkowski's Textbook on Roman Law is the leading textbook in the field of Roman law, and has been written with undergraduate students firmly in mind. The book provides an accessible and highly engaging account of Roman private law and civil procedure, with coverage of all key topics, including the Roman legal system, and the law of persons, property, and obligations. The author sets the law in its social and historical context, and demonstrates the impact of Roman law on our modern legal systems. For the fifth edition, Paul du Plessis has included references to a wide range of scholarly texts, to ground his judicious account of Roman law firmly in contemporary scholarship. He has also added examples from legal practice, as well as truncated timelines at the start of each chapter to illustrate how the law developed over time. The book contains a wealth of learning features, including chapter summaries, diagrams and maps. A major feature of the book is the inclusion throughout of extracts in translation from the most important sources of Roman law: the Digest and the Institutes of Justinian. Annotated further reading sections at the end of each chapter act as a guide to further enquiry. Online Resource Centre The book is accompanied by an extensive Online Resource Centre, containing the following resources: -Self-test multiple choice questions -Interactive timeline -Biographies of key figures -Glossary of Latin terms -Annotated web links -Original Latin versions of the extracts from the Digest and the Institutes of Justinian -Examples of textual analysis of Roman law texts -Guide to the literature and sources of Roman law
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Author: Clifford Ando,Paul J du Plessis,Kaius Tuori

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0191044431

Category: History

Page: 650

View: 1553

The Handbook is intended to survey the landscape of contemporary research and chart principal directions of future inquiry. Its aim is to bring to bear upon Roman legal study the full range of intellectual resources of contemporary legal history, from comparison to popular constitutionalism, from international private law to law and society. This unique contribution of the volumesets it apart from others in the field. Furthermore, the volume brings the study of Roman law into closer alignment, and thus into dialogue, with historical, sociological, and anthropological research in law in other periods. The volume is therefore directed not simply to ancient historians and legal historians already focused on the ancient world, but to historians of all periods interested in law and its complex and multifaceted relationship to society.
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Author: Olga Tellegen-Couperus

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134908016

Category: History

Page: 192

View: 7571

The most important creation of the Romans was their law. In this book, Dr Tellegen-Couperus discusses the way in which the Roman jurists created and developed law and the way in which Roman law has come down to us. Special attention is given to questions such as `who were the jurists and their law schools' and to the close connection between jurists and the politics of their time.
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Author: William Livesey Burdick

Publisher: The Lawbook Exchange, Ltd.

ISBN: 1584772530

Category: History

Page: 748

View: 5207

Burdick, William L. The Principles of Roman Law and Their Relation to Modern Law. Rochester: The Lawyers Co-operative Publishing Co., [1938]. xxi, 748 pp. Reprinted 2004 by The Lawbook Exchange, Ltd. LCCN 20020254946. ISBN 1-58477-253-0. Cloth. $110. * General survey of the principles of Roman law as they have developed over time with respect to their place in civil law, English common law and the American and Canadian legal systems. Contents include "The World Wide Extension of Roman Law," "The Civil Law in the United States and Canada," "Outlines of Roman Law History," "The Corpus Juris Civilis," "The Law of Persons including Marriage, Husband and Wife, Divorce, Parent and Child, Guardian and Ward," "The Law of Property," "The Law of Obligations," "The Law of Succession," "The Law of Actions" and "The Law of Public Wrongs." A solid introduction to the subject of Roman law and its application in personal and family law in subsequent legal systems.
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Author: Benjamin Straumann

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107092906

Category: History

Page: 283

View: 2545

Offers a new interpretation of the foundations of Hugo Grotius' highly influential doctrine of natural law and natural rights.
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From Augustus to Justinian

Author: W. W. Buckland,Peter Stein

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521043689

Category: History

Page: 796

View: 6531

A revised edition of Peter Buckland's classic textbook on Roman Law.
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Author: David Johnston

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521895642

Category: History

Page: 552

View: 8655

This book reflects the wide range of current scholarship on Roman law, covering private, criminal and public law.
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Problems and Methods for Ancient Historians

Author: O. F. Robinson

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134877773

Category: History

Page: 168

View: 1456

The notion and understanding of law penetrated society in Ancient Rome to a degree unparalleled in modern times. The poet Juvenal, for instance, described the virtuous man as a good soldier, faithful guardian, incorruptible judge and honest witness. This book is concerned with four central questions: Who made the law? Where did a Roman go to discover what the law was? How has the law survived to be known to us today? And what procedures were there for putting the law into effect? In The Sources of Roman Law, the origins of law and their relative weight are described in the light of developing Roman history. This is a topic that appeals to a wide range of readers: the law student will find illumination for the study of the substantive law; the student of history will be guided into an appreciation of what Roman law means as well as its value for the understanding and interpretation of Roman history. Both will find invaluable the description of how the sources have survived to inform our legal system and pose their problems for us.
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Author: A. D. E. Lewis,D. J. Ibbetson

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521441995

Category: Law

Page: 234

View: 8753

The law developed by the ancient Romans remains a powerful legal and political instrument today. In The Roman Law Tradition a general editorial introduction complements a series of more detailed essays by an international team of distinguished legal scholars exploring the various ways in which Roman law has affected and continues to affect patterns of legal decision-making throughout the world.
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Author: Alan Watson

Publisher: University of Georgia Press

ISBN: 0820330612

Category: Law

Page: 241

View: 6077

This book is not about the rules or concepts of Roman law, says Alan Watson, but about the values and approaches, explicit and implicit, of those who made the law. The scope of Watson's concerns encompasses the period from the Twelve Tables, around 451 B.C., to the end of the so-called classical period, around A.D. 235. As he discusses the issues and problems that faced the Roman legal intelligentsia, Watson also holds up Roman law as a clear, although admittedly extreme, example of law's enormous impact on society in light of society's limited input into law. Roman private law has been the most admired and imitated system of private law in the world, but it evolved, Watson argues, as a hobby of gentlemen, albeit a hobby that carried social status. The jurists, the private individuals most responsible for legal development, were first and foremost politicians and (in the Empire) bureaucrats; their engagement with the law was primarily to win the esteem of their peers. The exclusively patrician College of Pontiffs was given a monopoly on interpretation of private law in the mid fifth century B.C. Though the College would lose its exclusivity and monopoly, interpretation of law remained one mark of a Roman gentleman. But only interpretation of the law, not conceptualization or systematization or reform, gave prestige, says Watson. Further, the jurists limited themselves to particular modes of reasoning: no arguments to a ruling could be based on morality, justice, economic welfare, or what was approved elsewhere. No praetor (one of the elected officials who controlled the courts) is famous for introducing reforms, Watson points out, and, in contrast with a nonjurist like Cicero, no jurist theorized about the nature of law. A strong characteristic of Roman law is its relative autonomy, and isolation from the rest of life. Paradoxically, this very autonomy was a key factor in the Reception of Roman Law--the assimilation of the learned Roman law as taught at the universities into the law of the individual territories of Western Europe.
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The Condition of the Slave in Private Law from Augustus to Justinian

Author: William Warwick Buckland

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Persons (Roman law)

Page: 735

View: 3901

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