A History Of The Pacific Salmon Crisis

Author: Jim Lichatowich,James A. Lichatowich

Publisher: Island Press

ISBN: 9781559633611

Category: History

Page: 336

View: 998

Looks at salmon restoration efforts, including the role of hatcheries, public policy, and the economics of the Pacific Northwest.
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A History Of The Pacific Salmon Crisis

Author: James A. Lichatowich

Publisher: Island Press

ISBN: 1597268895

Category: Nature

Page: 336

View: 6267

From a mountain top where an eagle carries a salmon carcass to feed its young to the oceanic waters of the California current and the Alaskan Gyre, salmon have penetrated the Northwest to an extent unmatched by other animals. Since the turn of the twentieth century, natural productivity of salmon in Oregon, Washington, California, and Idaho has declined 80 percent. The decline of Pacific salmon to the brink of extinction is a sign of serious problems in the region. In Salmon Without Rivers, fisheries biologist Jim Lichatowich offers an eye-opening look at the roots and evolution of the salmon crisis in the Pacific Northwest. He describes the multitude of factors over the past century and a half that have led to the salmon's decline, and examines the failure of restoration efforts that have focused almost exclusively on hatcheries to return salmon stocks to healthy levels without addressing underlying causes of the decline. Lichatowich argues that the dominant worldview of our society -- a worldview that denies connections between humans and the natural world -- has created the conflict that characterizes the recent history of salmon; unless that worldview is challenged, there is little hope for recovery. Salmon Without Rivers exposes the myths that have guided recent human-salmon interactions. It explains the difficult choices facing citizens of the region, and provides unique insight into one of the most tragic chapters in our nation's environmental history.
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A History Of The Pacific Salmon Crisis

Author: Jim Lichatowich

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Nature

Page: 317

View: 6151

Looks at salmon restoration efforts, including the role of hatcheries, public policy, and the economics of the Pacific Northwest.
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Endangered Salmon And The People Of The Pacific Northwest

Author: Joseph Cone

Publisher: Henry Holt and Company

ISBN: 1466884266

Category: Nature

Page: 340

View: 5144

Though life on earth is the history of dynamic interactions between living things and their surroundings, certain powerful groups would have us believe that nature exists only for our convenience. One consequence of such thinking is the apparent fate of the Pacific salmon--a key resource and preeminent symbol of America's wildlife--which is today threatened with extinction. Drawing on abundant data from natural science, Pacific coast culture, and a long association with key individuals on all sides of the issue, Joseph Cone's A Common Fate employs a clear narrative voice to tell the human and natural history of an environmental crisis in its final chapter. As inevitable as the November rains, countless millions of wild salmon returned from the ocean to spawn in the streams of their birth. In the wake of an orgy of dam building and habitat destruction, the salmon's majestic abundance has been reduced to a fleeting shadow. Neglect is the word the author uses to describe more recent losses, "by exactly the ones--state and federal fish managers--who should have acted." To signal a new awareness that action is needed, scientists charged with restocking the Columbia River Basin are receiving significant support, while ordinary citizens are beginning to recognize the relationship between cheap power and the absences of chinook, coho, sockeye, and other species from the coasts of Oregon and Washington and from Idaho's Snake River. As desperate as the salmon's future appears, the book is not an elegy for a lost resource. Instead, it bears witness to hope. In addition to concrete plans for the wild salmon's renewal, the reader will hear a growing chorus of informed individuals of differing values and beliefs who recognize that our fate is inextricably bound to the salmon's; for many it is a new understanding.
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Author: Thomas P. Quinn

Publisher: UBC Press

ISBN: 0774842431

Category: Nature

Page: 320

View: 3287

The Behavior and Ecology of Pacific Salmon and Trout explains the patterns of mate choice, the competition for nest sites, and the fate of the salmon after their death. It describes the lives of offspring during the months they spend incubating in gravel, growing in fresh water, and migrating out to sea to mature. This thorough, up-to-date survey should be on the shelf of everyone with a professional or personal interest in Pacific salmon and trout. Written in a technically accurate but engaging style, it will appeal to a wide range of readers, including students, anglers, biologists, conservationists, legislators, and armchair naturalists.
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The Thousand-Year Run of Salmon

Author: David Montgomery

Publisher: Basic Books

ISBN: 0786739932

Category: Social Science

Page: 304

View: 1573

The salmon that symbolize the Pacific Northwest's natural splendor are now threatened with extinction across much of their ancestral range. In studying the natural and human forces that shape the rivers and mountains of that region, geologist David Montgomery has learned to see the evolution and near-extinction of the salmon as a story of changing landscapes. Montgomery shows how a succession of historical experiences -first in the United Kingdom, then in New England, and now in the Pacific Northwest -repeat a disheartening story in which overfishing and sweeping changes to rivers and seas render the world inhospitable to salmon. In King of Fish, Montgomery traces the human impacts on salmon over the last thousand years and examines the implications both for salmon recovery efforts and for the more general problem of human impacts on the natural world. What does it say for the long-term prospects of the world's many endangered species if one of the most prosperous regions of the richest country on earth cannot accommodate its icon species? All too aware of the possible bleak outcome for the salmon, King of Fishconcludes with provocative recommendations for reinventing the ways in which we make environmental decisions about land, water, and fish.
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The First Map-based Status Assessment of Salmon in the North Pacific

Author: Xanthippe Augerot

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 150

View: 6392

"Salmon are the world's most complex fishes, and no other swimming creatures have so affected peoples' view of themselves and their place in the world. This excellent Atlas is the most illuminating overview ever conceived about these miraculous creatures and their human and biological context."--Carl Safina, author of "Song for the Blue Ocean " "This atlas is no less than a guide to salmon conservation from California to Japan. The maps are works of art and their message is urgent: salmon populations need help everywhere."--Peter B. Moyle, author of "Inland Fishes of California" "Finally, a book that recognizes the true size and scope of the Pacific salmon ecosystem and the biological, cultural, and economic importance of salmon in that vast area. Such a bold and holistic approach has been needed for a long time."--Jim Lichatowich, author of "Salmon without Rivers "
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Author: Blaine Harden

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN: 0393342565

Category: Nature

Page: 286

View: 6309

"Superbly reported and written with clarity, insight, and great skill." —Washington Post Book World After two decades, Washington Post journalist Blaine Harden returned to his small-town birthplace in the Pacific Northwest to follow the rise and fall of the West’s most thoroughly conquered river. To explore the Columbia River and befriend those who collaborated in its destruction, he traveled on a monstrous freight barge sailing west from Idaho to the Grand Coulee Dam, the site of the river’s harnessing for the sake of jobs, electricity, and irrigation. A River Lost is a searing personal narrative of rediscovery joined with a narrative of exploitation: of Native Americans, of endangered salmon, of nuclear waste, and of a once-wild river. Updated throughout, this edition features a new foreword and afterword.
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A Novel

Author: Craig Lesley

Publisher: Macmillan

ISBN: 9780312244910

Category: Fiction

Page: 320

View: 3546

Danny Kachiah, a Native American wanderer from Oregon, searches for the wisdom of the traditional ways in order to pass them on to his son, a quest that ends when he meets Willis Salwish, an old River Indian. Reprint.
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Removing Dams, Rewilding Salmon, Revitalizing Communities

Author: Steven Hawley

Publisher: Beacon Press

ISBN: 0807004715

Category: Nature

Page: 252

View: 632

Focusing on the Snake River in Washington state, looks at the actions being taken to remove federally-funded hydroelectric dams from America's waterways and details the environmental, economic, and scientific benefits of dam removal and the powerful interests resisting this movement.
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An Environmental History of the Northwest Fisheries Crisis

Author: Joseph E. Taylor III

Publisher: University of Washington Press

ISBN: 9780295989914

Category: Technology & Engineering

Page: 488

View: 9339

Winner of the George Perkins Marsh Award, American Society for Environmental History
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Natural Resource Careers that Make a Difference

Author: Michael E. Fraidenburg

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Nature

Page: 203

View: 4683

Intelligent Courage presents practical, wise, workable ideas to succeed in the real-world work environment of natural resource professionals. It is especially relevant for students nearing completion of their university education. Seasoned professionals tell career stories and analyze these as learning experiences. In doing so these distinguished professionals impart a good deal of the 'street smarts' they learned from their careers that can help any natural resource professional create the career they want.
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The Future of the Last Wild Food

Author: Paul Greenberg

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 9781101442296

Category: Nature

Page: 304

View: 8479

"A necessary book for anyone truly interested in what we take from the sea to eat, and how, and why." -Sam Sifton, The New York Times Book Review. Acclaimed author of American Catch and The Omega Princple and life-long fisherman, Paul Greenberg takes us on a journey, examining the four fish that dominate our menus: salmon, sea bass, cod, and tuna. Investigating the forces that get fish to our dinner tables, Greenberg reveals our damaged relationship with the ocean and its inhabitants. Just three decades ago, nearly everything we ate from the sea was wild. Today, rampant overfishing and an unprecedented biotech revolution have brought us to a point where wild and farmed fish occupy equal parts of a complex marketplace. Four Fish offers a way for us to move toward a future in which healthy and sustainable seafood is the rule rather than the exception.
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American Experiences in Global Perspective

Author: Mansel G. Blackford

Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

ISBN: 0812206274

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 6456

In the spring of 2007, National Geographic warned, "The oceans are in deep blue trouble. From the northernmost reaches of the Greenland Sea to the swirl of the Antarctic Circle, we are gutting our seas of fish." There were legitimate grounds for concern. After increasing more than fourfold between 1950 and 1994, the global wild fish catch reached a plateau and stagnated despite exponential growth in the fishing industry. As numerous scientific reports showed, many fish stocks around the world collapsed, creating a genuine global overfishing crisis. Making Seafood Sustainable analyzes the ramifications of overfishing for the United States by investigating how fishers, seafood processors, retailers, government officials, and others have worked together to respond to the crisis. Historian Mansel G. Blackford examines how these players took steps to make fishing in some American waters, especially in Alaskan waters, sustainable. Critical to these efforts, Blackford argues, has been government and industry collaboration in formulating and enforcing regulations. What can be learned from these successful experiences? Are they applicable elsewhere? What are the drawbacks? Making Seafood Sustainable addresses these questions and suggests that sustainable seafood management can be made to work. The economic and social costs incurred in achieving sustainable resource usage are significant, but there are ways to mitigate them. More broadly, this study illustrates ways to manage commonly held natural resources around the world—land, water, oil, and so on—in sustainable ways.
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The Life and Legacy of Bill Frank Jr.

Author: Trova Heffernan

Publisher: University of Washington Press

ISBN: 0295997958

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 328

View: 8983

Billy Frank Jr. was an early participant in the fight for tribal fishing rights during the 1960s. Roughed up, belittled, and handcuffed on the riverbank, he emerged as one of the most influential Northwest Indians in modern history. His efforts helped bring about the 1974 ruling by Federal Judge George H. Boldt affirming Northwest tribal fishing rights and allocating half the harvestable catch to them. Today, he continues to support Indian country and people by working to protect salmon and restore the environment. Where the Salmon Run tells the life story of Billy Frank Jr., from his father's influential tales, through the difficult and contentious days of the Fish Wars, to today. Based on extensive interviews with Billy, his family, close advisors, as well as political allies and former foes, and the holdings of Washington State's cultural institutions, we learn about the man behind the legend, and the people who helped him along the way.
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Removing Dams, Rewilding Salmon, Revitalizing Communities

Author: Steven Hawley

Publisher: Beacon Press

ISBN: 0807004723

Category: Nature

Page: 256

View: 6871

A powerful argument for why dam removal makes good scientific, economic, and environmental sense—and requires our urgent attention The Snake River, flowing through the Northwest, was once one of the world's greatest salmon rivers. As recently as a hundred years ago, it retained some of its historic bounty with seven million fish coming home to spawn there. Now, due to damming for hydroelectricity over the past fifty years, the salmon population has dropped close to extinction. Efforts at salmon recovery, through fish ladders, hatcheries, and even trucking them over the dams, have failed. Hawley argues that the solution for the Snake River lies in dam removal, pitting the power authority and Army Corps of Engineers against a collection of conservationists, farmers, commercial and recreational fishermen, and the Nez Perce tribe. He also demonstrates the interconnectedness of the river's health to Orca whales in Puget Sound, local economies, fresh water rights, and energy independence. This regional battle has garnered national interest, and is part of a widespread river-restoration movement that stretches from Maine's Kennebec to California's Klamath. In one instance, Butte Creek salmon rebounded from a paltry fourteen fish to twenty thousand within just a few years of rewilding their river, showing the incredible resiliency of nature when given the slightest chance. In this timely book, Hawley shows how river restoration, with dam removal as its centerpiece, is not only virtuous ecological practice, but a growing social and economic enterprise.
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The Remaking of the Columbia River

Author: Richard White

Publisher: Hill and Wang

ISBN: 1429952423

Category: History

Page: 144

View: 3042

The Hill and Wang Critical Issues Series: concise, affordable works on pivotal topics in American history, society, and politics. In this pioneering study, White explores the relationship between the natural history of the Columbia River and the human history of the Pacific Northwest for both whites and Native Americans. He concentrates on what brings humans and the river together: not only the physical space of the region but also, and primarily, energy and work. For working with the river has been central to Pacific Northwesterners' competing ways of life. It is in this way that White comes to view the Columbia River as an organic machine--with conflicting human and natural claims--and to show that whatever separation exists between humans and nature exists to be crossed.
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What Past Floods, Droughts, and Other Climatic Clues Tell Us about Tomorrow

Author: B. Lynn Ingram,Frances Malamud-Roam

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520954807

Category: Nature

Page: 280

View: 8506

The West without Water documents the tumultuous climate of the American West over twenty millennia, with tales of past droughts and deluges and predictions about the impacts of future climate change on water resources. Looking at the region’s current water crisis from the perspective of its climate history, the authors ask the central question of what is "normal" climate for the West, and whether the relatively benign climate of the past century will continue into the future. The West without Water merges climate and paleoclimate research from a wide variety of sources as it introduces readers to key discoveries in cracking the secrets of the region’s climatic past. It demonstrates that extended droughts and catastrophic floods have plagued the West with regularity over the past two millennia and recounts the most disastrous flood in the history of California and the West, which occurred in 1861–62. The authors show that, while the West may have temporarily buffered itself from such harsh climatic swings by creating artificial environments and human landscapes, our modern civilization may be ill-prepared for the future climate changes that are predicted to beset the region. They warn that it is time to face the realities of the past and prepare for a future in which fresh water may be less reliable.
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Reflections On Trout Streams And Fly Fishing

Author: Ted Leeson

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 1461749093

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 192

View: 3049

Originally published in 1994, this book was a fly-fishing phenomenon in the way Howell Raines's Fly Fishing Through the Mid-Life Crisis was. Taking his fishing hobby to near metaphysical levels, Ted Leeson tells about his passions: rivers, trout, and fly fishing. With wry humor and rare insight, he explores questions that engage most fishermen: What is it about rivers that draws us so irresistibly, and why does fly fishing seem such an aptly suited response? Above all, The Habit of Rivers is about ways of seeing the wonderfully textured world that emanates from a river.
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