A Rwandan Journey

Author: Fergal Keane

Publisher: Penguin UK

ISBN: 0141927739

Category: History

Page: 224

View: 4307

When President Habyarimana’s jet was shot down in April 1994, Rwanda erupted into a hundred-day orgy of killing – which left up to a million dead. Fergal Keane travelled through the country as the genocide was continuing, and his powerful analysis reveals the terrible truth behind the headlines. ‘A tender, angry account ... As well as being a scathing indictment – Keane says the genocide inflicted on the Tutsis was planned well in advance by Hutu leaders – this is a graphic view of news-gathering in extremis. It deserves to become a classic’ Independent.
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A Rwandan Journey

Author: Fergal Keane

Publisher: Viking Press

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 198

View: 4901

A journalist who covered the one-hundred-day Rwandan war in 1994 provides a disturbing account that suggests that a power-hungry group, using hate radio and local political leaders as brainwashers, purposefully incited thousands of Hutus to kill minority Tutsis and more moderate Hutus.
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A Rwandan Journey

Author: Fergal Keane

Publisher: Penguin UK

ISBN: 0140247602

Category: History

Page: 198

View: 484

A journalist who covered the one-hundred-day Rwandan war in 1994 provides a disturbing account that suggests that a power-hungry group, using hate radio and local political leaders as brainwashers, purposely incited thousands of Hutus to kill minority Tutsis
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Author: Taylor Brown

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781941209042

Category: Fiction

Page: 160

View: 5232

Winner of the Montana Prize in Fiction, Taylor Brown offers up a stunning debut collection of stories. Charles Dodd White, author of A Shelter of Others, says, "With ferocious economy and a great big heart, Taylor Brown writes one of the best debuts I've ever picked up. These are stories, verses, meditations, and accusations-everything, in short, you could hope to get from important fiction. This work demands your attention."
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Enchantment, Terror and Deliverance in the City of Love

Author: David Talbot

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 9781439127872

Category: History

Page: 480

View: 4425

Salon founder David Talbot chronicles the cultural history of San Francisco and from the late 1960s to the early 1980s when figures such as Harvey Milk, Janis Joplin, Jim Jones, and Bill Walsh helped usher from backwater city to thriving metropolis.
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Author: Tomi Adeyemi

Publisher: Henry Holt and Company (BYR)

ISBN: 1250170982

Category: Young Adult Fiction

Page: 448

View: 4030

With five starred reviews, Tomi Adeyemi’s West African-inspired fantasy debut, and instant #1 New York Times Bestseller, conjures a world of magic and danger, perfect for fans of Leigh Bardugo and Sabaa Tahir. They killed my mother. They took our magic. They tried to bury us. Now we rise. Zélie Adebola remembers when the soil of Orïsha hummed with magic. Burners ignited flames, Tiders beckoned waves, and Zélie’s Reaper mother summoned forth souls. But everything changed the night magic disappeared. Under the orders of a ruthless king, maji were killed, leaving Zélie without a mother and her people without hope. Now Zélie has one chance to bring back magic and strike against the monarchy. With the help of a rogue princess, Zélie must outwit and outrun the crown prince, who is hell-bent on eradicating magic for good. Danger lurks in Orïsha, where snow leoponaires prowl and vengeful spirits wait in the waters. Yet the greatest danger may be Zélie herself as she struggles to control her powers and her growing feelings for an enemy. "A phenomenon." —Entertainment Weekly “The epic I’ve been waiting for.” —New York Times-bestselling author Marie Lu “You will be changed. You will be ready to rise up and reclaim your own magic!” —New York Times-bestselling author Dhonielle Clayton “The next big thing in literature and film.” —Ebony “One of the biggest young adult fiction debut book deals of theyear.” —Teen Vogue This title has Common Core connections. #1 New York Times bestseller, March 14, 2018
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A Journey Through the Money, Medicine, and Mysteries of Blood

Author: Rose George

Publisher: Metropolitan Books

ISBN: 162779638X

Category: Science

Page: 304

View: 7131

An eye-opening exploration of blood, the lifegiving substance with the power of taboo, the value of diamonds and the promise of breakthrough science Blood carries life, yet the sight of it makes people faint. It is a waste product and a commodity pricier than oil. It can save lives and transmit deadly infections. Each one of us has roughly nine pints of it, yet many don’t even know their own blood type. And for all its ubiquitousness, the few tablespoons of blood discharged by 800 million women are still regarded as taboo: menstruation is perhaps the single most demonized biological event. Rose George, author of The Big Necessity, is renowned for her intrepid work on topics that are invisible but vitally important. In Nine Pints, she takes us from ancient practices of bloodletting to modern “hemovigilance” teams that track blood-borne diseases. She introduces Janet Vaughan, who set up the world’s first system of mass blood donation during the Blitz, and Arunachalam Muruganantham, known as “Menstrual Man” for his work on sanitary pads for developing countries. She probes the lucrative business of plasma transfusions, in which the US is known as the “OPEC of plasma.” And she looks to the future, as researchers seek to bring synthetic blood to a hospital near you. Spanning science and politics, stories and global epidemics, Nine Pints reveals our life's blood in an entirely new light.
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A medieval mystery

Author: Jeri Westerson

Publisher: Severn House Publishers Ltd

ISBN: 1780109253

Category: Fiction

Page: 224

View: 6055

A missing Holy Relic. A mysterious and beautiful woman. Two murdered monks: Crispin Guest tackles his most intriguing investigation to date. 1390. Hailes Abbey, Gloucestershire, England. Two monks lie murdered, their Holy Blood relic stolen: a relic that is said to run liquid for the sinless and remain stubbornly dry for the sinner. Unwilling to become involved in a bitter dispute between a country monastery and Westminster Abbey, the disgraced former knight Crispin Guest attempts to return the relic to Hailes where it belongs, but somehow it keeps returning to his hands no matter what. As he tries to shield a former nemesis from a charge of murder while becoming entangled with a mysterious and beautiful woman caught between Church politics and the dangerous intrigues of King Richard?s court, Crispin begins to suspect that someone at Westminster is conspiring with the assassins. Can the Blood of Christ point to the killer?
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Author: Clive Barker

Publisher: Berkley Publishing Group

ISBN: 9780425083895

Category: Fiction

Page: 272

View: 568

Six horror stories deal with a haunted theater, messages from the dead, a series of gruesome subway murders, demons, cannibalism, and a monstrous giant
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A Season of Change

Author: Peter J. Marchand

Publisher: UPNE

ISBN: 9780874518702

Category: Nature

Page: 151

View: 2023

An expert on winter now turns his talents to autumn, a season of beauty and change. Author of the award-winning Life in the Cold, Peter J. Marchand examines the natural and biological phenomena of fall. With Marchand as your guide, fall becomes much more than trees turning, killing frosts, birds migrating, and invigorating crisp weather. Dig under the fallen leaves and heavy mists with him to discover a vibrant world. Readers learn the whys and wherefores of these events, but much much more, as Marchand answers questions most non-specialists have about how and why such changes and adaptations occur. Though autumn may appear to be primarily a transitional season, he shows how many remarkable and essential natural processes happen routinely only during this period. He describes such topics as timekeeping in plants and animals, food hoarding, seed dispersal, and animal mating behavior among the large mammals of the North. The book is organized by theme rather than by species, so that similar adaptation mechanisms of different species can be compared and contrasted. Marchand has a demonstrated skill in making scientific facts easily understood, while also conveying the beauty and wonder of what he describes. Also an accomplished photographer, his many beautiful full-page photographs show unusual aspects of the season.
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How the Occult Saved Rock and Roll

Author: Peter Bebergal

Publisher: Tarcher

ISBN: 0399174966

Category: Music

Page: 288

View: 8037

This epic cultural and historical odyssey unearths the full influence of occult traditions on rock and roll - from the Beatles to Black Sabbath - and shows how the marriage between mysticism and music changed our world. From the hoodoo-inspired sounds of Elvis Presley to the Eastern odysseys of George Harrison, from the dark dalliances of Led Zeppelin to the Masonic imagery of today's hip-hop scene, the occult has long breathed life into rock and hip-hop. Writing with vivid storytelling and laser-sharp analysis, Peter Bebergal reveals how esoteric and supernatural traditions became a key part of emergence and progress of rock and roll. 'Fascinating . . . an absorbing read deserving an important place in rock literature.' Michael Moorcock 'Passionate, informed, gripping and at times wonderfully lyrical.' Jason Heller, NPR.com'Kudos to Bebergal for taming the wily spirits of rock long enough to capture their essence in this fascinating book. Perhaps more impressive is the book's comprehensiveness . . . Season of the Witchputs the hellfire in highbrow.' Casey Rae, The Contrarian'Skillfully woven . . . will delight any music fan and music historian in equal measure.' Spirituality Today'A thoroughly researched, absorbing, entertaining ride for anyone who's ever played the Beatles' 'White Album' backwards.' Andrea Shea, WBUR/ NPR'A must-read.' Cheryl Eddy, io9.com
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Author: Roy Porter

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN: 0393243346

Category: Medical

Page: 224

View: 6556

"Ideas tumble out of Porter like wonders from some scholarly horn of plenty." —Sherwin B. Nuland, The New Republic An eminently readable, entertaining romp through the history of our vain and valiant efforts to heal ourselves. Mankind's battle to stay alive and healthy for as long as possible is our oldest, most universal struggle. With his characteristic wit and vastly informed historical scope, Roy Porter examines the war fought between disease and doctors on the battleground of the flesh from ancient times to the present. He explores the many ingenious ways in which we have attempted to overcome disease through the ages: the changing role of doctors, from ancient healers, apothecaries, and blood-letters to today's professionals; the array of drugs, from Ayurvedic remedies to the launch of Viagra; the advances in surgery, from amputations performed by barbers without anesthetic to today's sophisticated transplants; and the transformation of hospitals from Christian places of convalescence to modern medical powerhouses. Cleverly illustrated with historic line drawings, the chronic ailments of humanity provide vivid anecdotes for Porter's enlightening story of medicine's efforts to prevail over a formidable and ever-changing adversary.
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The Rise of Mickey Mantle

Author: Randy Roberts,Johnny Smith

Publisher: Basic Books

ISBN: 0465094430

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 304

View: 3570

The story of Mickey Mantle's magnificent 1956 season Mickey Mantle was the ideal batter for the atomic age, capable of hitting a baseball harder and farther than any other player in history. He was also the perfect idol for postwar America, a wholesome hero from the heartland. In A Season in the Sun, acclaimed historians Randy Roberts and Johnny Smith recount the defining moment of Mantle's legendary career: 1956, when he overcame a host of injuries and critics to become the most celebrated athlete of his time. Taking us from the action on the diamond to Mantle's off-the-field exploits, Roberts and Smith depict Mantle not as an ideal role model or a bitter alcoholic, but a complex man whose faults were smoothed over by sportswriters eager to keep the truth about sports heroes at bay. An incisive portrait of an American icon, A Season in the Sun is an essential work for baseball fans and anyone interested in the 1950s.
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living with deer in America

Author: Richard K. Nelson

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: N.A

Category: Nature

Page: 389

View: 1996

Examines the physiology of deer, and describes how they have had to adapt to man's encroachment on their natural environments in varied parts of the United States
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Author: Patrick Phillips

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN: 0393293025

Category: History

Page: 304

View: 8170

“Gripping and meticulously documented.”—Don Schanche Jr., Washington Post Forsyth County, Georgia, at the turn of the twentieth century, was home to a large African American community that included ministers and teachers, farmers and field hands, tradesmen, servants, and children. But then in September of 1912, three young black laborers were accused of raping and murdering a white girl. One man was dragged from a jail cell and lynched on the town square, two teenagers were hung after a one-day trial, and soon bands of white “night riders” launched a coordinated campaign of arson and terror, driving all 1,098 black citizens out of the county. The charred ruins of homes and churches disappeared into the weeds, until the people and places of black Forsyth were forgotten. National Book Award finalist Patrick Phillips tells Forsyth’s tragic story in vivid detail and traces its long history of racial violence all the way back to antebellum Georgia. Recalling his own childhood in the 1970s and ’80s, Phillips sheds light on the communal crimes of his hometown and the violent means by which locals kept Forsyth “all white” well into the 1990s. In precise, vivid prose, Blood at the Root delivers a “vital investigation of Forsyth’s history, and of the process by which racial injustice is perpetuated in America” (Congressman John Lewis).
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Catastrophe and Colonial Settlement in Early America

Author: Kathleen Donegan

Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

ISBN: 0812245407

Category: History

Page: 260

View: 6030

Seasons of Misery offers a boldly original account of early English settlement in American by placing catastrophe and crisis at the center of the story. Donegan argues that the constant state of suffering and uncertainty decisively formed the colonial identity and produced the first distinctly colonial literature.
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Author: Arthur Rimbaud

Publisher: BookRix

ISBN: 3736819250

Category: Poetry

Page: 33

View: 2742

A Season in Hell is an extended poem written and published by French writer Arthur Rimbaud. The book had a considerable influence on later artists and poets, for example the Surrealists. Henry Miller was important in introducing Rimbaud to America in the sixties. He once attempted an English translation of the book and wrote an extended essay on Rimbaud and A Season in Hell titled The Time of the Assassins. The poem is loosely divided into nine parts, some of which are much shorter than others. They differ markedly in tone and narrative comprehensibility, with some, such as "Bad Blood," 'being much more obviously influenced by Rimbaud's drug use than others, some argue. Academic critics have arrived at many varied and often entirely incompatible conclusions as to what meaning and philosophy may or may not be contained in the text, and will continue to do so.
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The Killers in Rwanda Speak

Author: Jean Hatzfeld

Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux

ISBN: 9781429923514

Category: History

Page: 272

View: 7441

In April-May 1994, 800,000 Rwandan Tutsis were massacred by their Hutu fellow citizens--about 10,000 a day, mostly being hacked to death by machete. In Machete Season, the veteran foreign correspondent Jean Hatzfeld reports on the results of his interviews with nine of the Hutu killers. They were all friends who came from a single region where they helped to kill 50,000 out of their 59,000 Tutsi neighbors, and all of them are now in prison, some awaiting execution. It is usually presumed that killers will not tell the truth about their brutal actions, but Hatzfeld elicited extraordinary testimony from these men about the genocide they had perpetrated. He rightly sees that their account raises as many questions as it answers. Adabert, Alphonse, Ignace, and the others (most of them farmers) told Hatzfeld how the work was given to them, what they thought about it, how they did it, and what their responses were to the bloodbath. "Killing is easier than farming," one says. "I got into it, no problem," says another. Each describes what it was like the first time he killed someone, what he felt like when he killed a mother and child, how he reacted when he killed a cordial acquaintance, how 'cutting' a person with a machete differed from 'cutting' a calf or a sugarcane. And they had plenty of time to tell Hatzfeld, too, about whether and why they had reconsidered their motives, their moral responsibility, their guilt, remorse, or indifference to the crimes. Hatzfeld's meditation on the banal, horrific testimony of the genocidaires and what it means is lucid, humane, and wise: he relates the Rwanda horror to war crimes and to other genocidal episodes in human history. Especially since the Holocaust, it has been conventional to presume that only depraved and monstrous evil incarnate could perpetrate such crimes, but it may be, he suggests, that such actions are within the realm of ordinary human conduct. To read this disturbing, enlightening and very brave book is to consider in a new light the foundation of human morality and ethics.
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