An Introduction to North American Archaeology

Author: Sarah Ward Neusius,G. Timothy Gross

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 9780195173857

Category: History

Page: 688

View: 3231

Read More

Author: Dan Hicks,Mary C. Beaudry

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107495172

Category: Social Science

Page: 420

View: 1838

The Cambridge Companion to Historical Archaeology provides an overview of the international field of historical archaeology (c.AD 1500 to the present) through seventeen specially-commissioned essays from leading researchers in the field. The volume explores key themes in historical archaeology including documentary archaeology, the writing of historical archaeology, colonialism, capitalism, industrial archaeology, maritime archaeology, cultural resource management and urban archaeology. Three special sections explore the distinctive contributions of material culture studies, landscape archaeology and the archaeology of buildings and the household. Drawing on case studies from North America, Europe, Australasia, Africa and around the world, the volume captures the breadth and diversity of contemporary historical archaeology, considers archaeology's relationship with history, cultural anthropology and other periods of archaeological study, and provides clear introductions to alternative conceptions of the field. This book is essential reading for anyone studying or researching the material remains of the recent past.
Read More

Author: Timothy R. Pauketat,Diana DiPaolo Loren

Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell

ISBN: 9780631231844

Category: Social Science

Page: 416

View: 741

This volume offers a rich and informative introduction to North American archaeology for all those interested in the history and culture of North American natives. Organized around central topics and debates within the discipline. Illustrated with case studies based on the lives of real people, to emphasize human agency, cultural practice, the body, issues of inequality, and the politics of archaeological practice. Highlights current understandings of cultural and historical processes in North America and situates these understandings within a global perspective.
Read More

the wild side of North American prehistory

Author: Stephen Williams

Publisher: Univ of Pennsylvania Pr

ISBN: 9780812282382

Category: History

Page: 407

View: 5932

Read More

Author: Paul G. Bahn

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521454735

Category: Art

Page: 302

View: 7706

Surveys prehistoric art throughout the world, including body art, art on rocks and walls, and objects; changes in scholarship; and what the art can reveal about early sexual, social, economic, and religious life
Read More

Author: Timothy Pauketat,Timothy R. Pauketat

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0190241098

Category: History

Page: 704

View: 7999

This volume explores 15,000 years of indigenous human history on the North American continent, drawing on the latest archaeological theories, time-honored methodologies, and rich datasets. From the Arctic south to the Mexican border and east to the Atlantic Ocean, all of the major cultural developments are covered in 53 chapters, with certain periods, places, and historical problems receiving special focus by the volume's authors. Questions like who first peopled the continent, what did it mean to have been a hunter-gatherer in the Great Basin versus the California coast, how significant were cultural exchanges between Native North Americans and Mesoamericans, and why do major historical changes seem to correspond to shifts in religion, politics, demography, and economy are brought into focus. The practice of archaeology itself is discussed as contributors wrestle with modern-day concerns with the implications of doing archaeology and its relevance for understanding ourselves today. In the end, the chapters in this book show us that the principal questions answered about human history through the archaeology of North America are central to any larger understanding of the relationships between people, cultural identities, landscapes, and the living of everyday life.
Read More

An Introduction

Author: Matthew Johnson

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 1444360418

Category: Social Science

Page: 328

View: 7915

Archaeological Theory, 2nd Edition is the mostcurrent and comprehensive introduction to the field available.Thoroughly revised and updated, this engaging text offers studentsan ideal entry point to the major concepts and ongoing debates inarchaeological research. New edition of a popular introductory text that exploresthe increasing diversity of approaches to archaeologicaltheory Features more extended coverage of 'traditional' orculture-historical archaeology Examines theory across the English-speaking world andbeyond Offers greatly expanded coverage of evolutionary theory,divided into sociocultural and Darwinist approaches Includes an expanded glossary, bibliography, and usefulsuggestions for further readings
Read More

Author: Wendy Ashmore,Robert Sharer

Publisher: McGraw-Hill Education

ISBN: 9780767427272

Category: Social Science

Page: 744

View: 9693

This is the only textbook which is organized to follow the steps of the actual process of archaeological research in order to present the methods and theoretical frameworks of archaeology, from the planning and actual conduct of field research, to the different ways archaeological data is interpreted to produce an understanding of the past. It is also the only such textbook to give the reader a series of firsthand accounts of what its like to do archaeology, written by a variety of practicing archaeologists.
Read More

A History of Archaeology

Author: William H. Stiebing

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN: 0195089219

Category: Social Science

Page: 315

View: 2289

When one hears the words "archaeology" or "archaeologist," often what comes to mind is an image of a romantic figure: Indiana Jones exploring exotic places in search of treasure and adventure. Indeed, novels, movies, and many popular accounts of archaeological discoveries have made this concept widespread. Tales of abandoned cities, ruined temples, primeval monuments, or mysterious ancient tombs tend to kindle the urge for adventure, exploration, or treasure hunting that seems to lie beneath the surface of even the most timid and conventional individuals. Today, however, archaeologists seek knowledge rather than objects that are intrinsically valuable. Their ultimate goal is to sweep aside the mists in which time has enveloped the past, helping us to understand vanished peoples and cultures. In Uncovering the Past, William H. Stiebing, Jr. offers an absorbing nontechnical history of archaeology, tracing the study of ancient material culture from its beginnings in the Renaissance through its development into the sophisticated modern discipline we know today. The first study to focus on archaeology as a discipline, Stiebing has organized this concise history into the four stages of archaeological development. The first two stages (1450-1860 and 1860-1925), known as the "heroic age," focus on the exploits of colorful, dynamic excavators who have made their mark on history and our imaginations. We read accounts of Giovanni Belzoni and the removal of the seven-ton colossus of Ramesses II, which was dragged by wooden platform and transported by boat from Egypt to London; we witness the clergyman John Peters's skirmish with Arab tribesmen, who surrounded his excavation site and finally pillaged and burned his camp; and Heinrich Schliemann's quest to prove the authenticity of Homer's Iliad by searching for ancient Troy along the Turkish coast. And we watch as archaeology comes of age as an academic discipline, employing stratigraphical excavation techniques, typographical sequence dating, and stratigraphically based pottery chronology--laying the foundation for universal archaeological activity. The third phase (1925-1960) marked the era of "Modern Archaeology," a time when, using the now generally accepted stratigraphical method of excavation, scholars were able to synthesize data to define individual cultures and trace their development through time. This period saw a greater use of scientific instruments and procedures to locate, date, and interpret remains, such as aerial photography, metal detectors, and most importantly, carbon-14 dating and tree-ring chronology. Lastly, Stiebing discusses the fourth phase of development (1960-present) which introduced a greater desire and need for a more complete understanding of ancient cultures, including their ecology, and attempts to explain why certain cultural phenomena occurred. He goes on to examine the greater emphasis on a cultural revolutionary approach, coupled with technological advances in robotics and computers over the last decade and a half and their commonplace role in modern archaeology. With over eighty photographs, illustrations, and maps, this vivid history is an outstanding introduction to the intriguing field of archaeology, chronicling the development of this former pastime of dilettantes into a rigorous science.
Read More

Author: David Macaulay

Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

ISBN: 9780547348629

Category: Young Adult Fiction

Page: 96

View: 1878

It is the year 4022; all of the ancient country of Usa has been buried under many feet of detritus from a catastrophe that occurred back in 1985. Imagine, then, the excitement that Howard Carson, an amateur archeologist at best, experienced when in crossing the perimeter of an abandoned excavation site he felt the ground give way beneath him and found himself at the bottom of a shaft, which, judging from the DO NOT DISTURB sign hanging from an archaic doorknob, was clearly the entrance to a still-sealed burial chamber. Carson's incredible discoveries, including the remains of two bodies, one of then on a ceremonial bed facing an altar that appeared to be a means of communicating with the Gods and the other lying in a porcelain sarcophagus in the Inner Chamber, permitted him to piece together the whole fabric of that extraordinary civilization.
Read More

An Introduction to Physical Anthropology and Archaeology

Author: Christopher R. DeCorse

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780819563774

Category: Antiquities, Prehistoric

Page: 253

View: 8057

Read More

Author: Jared Diamond

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN: 0393609294

Category: History

Page: 528

View: 749

"Fascinating.... Lays a foundation for understanding human history."—Bill Gates In this "artful, informative, and delightful" (William H. McNeill, New York Review of Books) book, Jared Diamond convincingly argues that geographical and environmental factors shaped the modern world. Societies that had had a head start in food production advanced beyond the hunter-gatherer stage, and then developed religion --as well as nasty germs and potent weapons of war --and adventured on sea and land to conquer and decimate preliterate cultures. A major advance in our understanding of human societies, Guns, Germs, and Steel chronicles the way that the modern world came to be and stunningly dismantles racially based theories of human history. Winner of the Pulitzer Prize, the Phi Beta Kappa Award in Science, the Rhone-Poulenc Prize, and the Commonwealth club of California's Gold Medal.
Read More

An Introduction

Author: Kevin Greene,Tom Moore

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1136860290

Category: Social Science

Page: 416

View: 9798

Archaeology: An Introduction looks behind the popular aspects of archaeology such as the discovery and excavation of sites, the study of human remains and animal bones, radiocarbon dating, museums and 'heritage' displays, and reveals the methods used by archaeologists. It also explains how the subject emerged from an amateur pursuit in the eighteenth century into a serious discipline, and explores changing fashions in interpretation in recent decades. This fifth edition has been updated by a new co-author, Tom Moore, and continues to include key references and guidance to help new readers find their way through the ever expanding range of archaeological publications. It conveys the excitement of new archaeological discoveries that appear on television or in newspapers while helping readers to evaluate them by explaining the methods and theories that lie behind them. Above all, while serving as a lucid textbook, it remains a very accessible account that will interest a wide readership. In addition to drawing upon examples and case studies from many regions of the world and periods of the past, it incorporates the authors' own fieldwork, research and teaching and features a new four-colour text design and colour illustrations plus an additional 50 topic boxes. The comprehensive glossary and bibliography are complemented by a support website hosted by Routledge to assist further study and wider learning. It includes chapter overviews, a testbank of questions, powerpoint discussion questions, web-links to support material for every chapter plus an online glossary and image bank. New to the fifth edition: inclusion of the latest survey techniques updated material on the development in dating, DNA analysis, isotopes and population movement coverage of new themes such as identity and personhood how different societies are defined from an anthropological point of view and the implications of this for archaeological interpretation the impact of climate change and sustainability on heritage management more on the history of archaeology Visit the companion website at www.routledge.com/textbooks/greene for additional resources, including: chapter overviews a testbank of questions PowerPoint discussion questions links to support material for every chapter an online glossary and image bank
Read More

An Archaeological Perspective

Author: Graham Connah

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521596909

Category: Social Science

Page: 340

View: 2320

This major new revised edition of African Civilizations re-examines the physical evidence for developing social complexity in tropical Africa over the last four thousand years and considers possible explanations of the developments that gave rise to it. Graham Connah focuses upon urbanism and state formation in seven main areas of Africa: Nubia, Ethiopia, the West African savanna, the West African forest, the East African coast and islands, the Zimbabwe Plateau, and parts of Central Africa. Extensively illustrated and offering an extended bibliography, this book provides essential reading on the topic.
Read More

An Archaeological Journey

Author: Brian M. Fagan

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780500021200

Category: History

Page: 272

View: 8341

Presents a history of North American settlement, from the first settlers over 15,000 years ago to the arrival of the Europeans in the fifthteenth century.
Read More

Archaeologists Explore the Lives of an Ancient Society

Author: Brian M. Fagan

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN: N.A

Category: Architecture

Page: 256

View: 8285

In this account of the people of Chaco Canyon, a leading expert on prehistoric culture weaves the latest discoveries on Chaco into a narrative of the foraging bands, humble farmers, and elaborate society that flourished between the tenth and twelfth centuries A.D.
Read More

Introducing Current Perspectives

Author: Oliver J. T. Harris,Craig Cipolla

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 1317497457

Category: Social Science

Page: 238

View: 5929

Archaeological Theory in the New Millennium provides an account of the changing world of archaeological theory and a challenge to more traditional narratives of archaeological thought. It charts the emergence of the new emphasis on relations as well as engaging with other current theoretical trends and the thinkers archaeologists regularly employ. Bringing together different strands of global archaeological theory and placing them in dialogue, the book explores the similarities and differences between different contemporary trends in theory while also highlighting potential strengths and weaknesses of different approaches. Written in a way to maximise its accessibility, in direct contrast to many of the sources on which it draws, Archaeological Theory in the New Millennium is an essential guide to cutting-edge theory for students and for professionals wishing to reacquaint themselves with this field.
Read More

An Introduction to Human Prehistory

Author: Kenneth L. Feder

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 9780199950737

Category: Social Science

Page: 563

View: 1449

Ideal for introduction to archaeology and world prehistory courses, The Past in Perspective: An Introduction to Human Prehistory, Sixth Edition, is an engaging and up-to-date chronological overview of human prehistory. Kenneth L. Feder introduces students to "the big picture"--the grand sweep of human evolutionary history--presenting the human past within the context of fundamental themes of cultural evolution. Written in a refreshingly accessible voice, this unique narrative personalizes the past and makes it relevant to today's students. Using a consistent chapter format--"Prelude, Chronicle, Issues and Debates, and Case Study Close-up"--Feder helps students master both what we definitely know and what is still debatable about the complex story of the human past. New to This Edition: An expanded discussion of techniques in the discovery, analysis, and interpretation of archaeological sites (Ch. 2) A new section on archaeological ethics Updated coverage of the earliest human settlement of the Pacific and in the New World (Ch. 7) A new "Issues and Debates" discussion: Was the Development of Civilization a Good Thing? (Ch. 10) Updated treatment of the Indus Valley and the development of the state in ancient China (Ch. 11) An expanded presentation of the Inca, including a new "Case Study Close-up" on child sacrifice (Ch. 13) A new "Case Study Close-up" (Ch. 14), organized to focus exclusively on North America
Read More