The First Modern Civil Rights Convictions

Author: James P. Turner

Publisher: University of Michigan Press

ISBN: 0472053744

Category: Political Science

Page: 144

View: 2952

A fascinating examination of the Viola Liuzzo trials, with a foreword by Ari Berman
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The First Modern Civil Rights Convictions

Author: James P. Turner

Publisher: University of Michigan Press

ISBN: 047212353X

Category: Political Science

Page: 144

View: 2391

In 1965 the drive for black voting rights in the south culminated in the epic Selma to Montgomery Freedom March. After brutal state police beatings stunned the nation on “Bloody Sunday,” troops under federal court order lined the route as the march finally made its way to the State Capitol and a triumphant address by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. But within hours klan terror struck, claiming the life of one of the marchers, Viola Liuzzo, a Detroit mother of five. Turner offers an insider’s view of the three trials that took place over the following nine months—which finally resulted in the conviction of the killers. Despite eyewitness testimony by an FBI informant who was riding in the car with the killers, two all-white state juries refused to convict. It took a team of Civil Rights Division lawyers, led by the legendary John Doar, to produce the landmark jury verdict that klansmen were no longer above the law. This is must reading today, as the voting rights won in Selma come under renewed attack. Explore several court documents, including court transcripts, exhibits, and memoranda on Fulcrum.org.
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The Life and Death of Viola Liuzzo

Author: Mary Stanton

Publisher: University of Georgia Press

ISBN: 9780820322742

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 250

View: 5692

Extensive and meticulous research marks the first full-length look at the life, murder, and legacy of Viola Liuzzo, a civil rights worker murdered by the Klan in 1965, whose memory was defamed by J. Edgar Hoover and the FBI. UP.
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The Viola Liuzzo Story

Author: Beatrice Siegel

Publisher: Simon & Schuster Books For Young Readers

ISBN: 9780027826326

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 125

View: 2458

Recounts the life of Viola Gregg Liuzzo, the mother of five and a native of Detroit, who worked valiantly in the transport team of Alabama's civil rights movement of 1965, until she was slain by the KKK.
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The FBI, the Ku Klux Klan, and the Murder of Viola Liuzzo

Author: Gary May

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780300184136

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 448

View: 6339

In The Informant, historian Gary May reveals the untold story of the murder of civil rights worker Viola Liuzzo, shot to death by members of the violent Birmingham Ku Klux Klan at the end of Martin Luther King's historic Voting Rights March in 1965. The case drew national attention and was solved almost instantly, because one of the Klansman present during the shooting was Gary Thomas Rowe, an undercover FBI informant. At the time, Rowe's information and subsequent testimony were heralded as a triumph of law enforcement. But as Gary May reveals in this provocative and powerful book, Rowe's history of collaboration with both the Klan and the FBI was far more complex. Based on previously unexamined FBI and Justice Department Records, The Informant demonstrates that in their ongoing efforts to protect Rowe's cover, the FBI knowingly became an accessory to some of the most grotesque crimes of the Civil Rights era--including a vicious attack on the Freedom Riders and perhaps even the bombing of the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church. A tale of a renegade informant and an intelligence system ill-prepared to deal with threats from within, The Informant offers a dramatic and cautionary tale about what can happen when secret police power goes unchecked.
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Notes on the Civil Rights Movement, Neoliberalism, and Politics

Author: Clarence Lang

Publisher: University of Michigan Press

ISBN: 0472052667

Category: History

Page: 159

View: 810

A spirited argument for moving beyond the legacy of the Civil Rights era to best understand the current situation of African Americans
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Author: William F. Buckley Jr.

Publisher: Encounter Books

ISBN: 1594038481

Category: History

Page: 488

View: 1476

John V. Lindsay was elected mayor of New York City in 1965. But that year’s mayoral campaign will forever be known as the Buckley campaign. “As a candidate,” Joseph Alsop conceded, “Buckley was cleverer and livelier than either of his rivals.” And Murray Kempton concluded that “The process which coarsens every other man who enters it has only refined Mr. Buckley.” The Unmaking of a Mayor is a time capsule of the political atmosphere of America in the spring of 1965, diagnosing the multitude of ills that plagued New York and other major cities: crime, narcotics, transportation, racial bias, mismanagement, taxes, and the problems of housing, police, and education. Buckley’s nimble dissection of these issues constitutes an excellent primer of conservative thought. A good pathologist, Buckley shows that the diseases afflicting New York City in 1965 were by no means of a unique strain, and compared them with issues that beset the country at large. Buckley offers a prescient vision of the Republican Party and America’s two-party system that will be of particular interest to today’s conservatives. The Unmaking of a Mayor ends with a wistful glance at what might have been in 1965—and what might yet be.
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Protest, Voting Rights, and the Struggle for Racial Equality

Author: Robert A. Pratt

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN: 1421421593

Category: History

Page: 160

View: 9502

"One can point to more than a few 'critical moments' in the civil rights movement of the 1960s. Even so, few incidents so starkly etched the just-treatment claims of the struggle and the raw brutality of the forces arrayed against its protagonists as did the attempted marches from Selma to the state capital in Montgomery, Alabama, in the spring of 1965. ... In March of that year the full force of the state of Alabama--state troopers with nightsticks, some mounted--fell on unarmed protestors as they crossed a bridge leading out of Selma, beating them and continuing to flail at them most of the way back into town. This ... event, much of it caught on television tape, helped the president and fellow Democrats decide to make enforcement of voting rights in the South the subject of special federal legislation. Pratt makes 'Bloody Sunday' the focus of a short book on the civil rights as voting rights movement, its background, and the continuing controversy over federal laws that benefit blacks specifically and impose sanctions on states with histories of impeding voting rights for all citizens"--
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The Voting Rights Act and the Transformation of American Democracy

Author: Gary May

Publisher: Basic Books

ISBN: 0465050735

Category: History

Page: 336

View: 2188

When the Fifteenth Amendment of 1870 granted African Americans the right to vote, it seemed as if a new era of political equality was at hand. Before long, however, white segregationists across the South counterattacked, driving their black countrymen from the polls through a combination of sheer terror and insidious devices such as complex literacy tests and expensive poll taxes. Most African Americans would remain voiceless for nearly a century more, citizens in name only until the passage of the 1965 Voting Rights Act secured their access to the ballot. In Bending Toward Justice, celebrated historian Gary May describes how black voters overcame centuries of bigotry to secure and preserve one of their most important rights as American citizens. The struggle that culminated in the passage of the Voting Rights Act was long and torturous, and only succeeded because of the courageous work of local freedom fighters and national civil rights leaders—as well as, ironically, the opposition of Southern segregationists and law enforcement officials, who won public sympathy for the voting rights movement by brutally attacking peaceful demonstrators. But while the Voting Rights Act represented an unqualified victory over such forces of hate, May explains that its achievements remain in jeopardy. Many argue that the 2008 election of President Barack Obama rendered the act obsolete, yet recent years have seen renewed efforts to curb voting rights and deny minorities the act’s hard-won protections. Legal challenges to key sections of the act may soon lead the Supreme Court to declare those protections unconstitutional. A vivid, fast-paced history of this landmark piece of civil rights legislation, Bending Toward Justice offers a dramatic, timely account of the struggle that finally won African Americans the ballot—although, as May shows, the fight for voting rights is by no means over.
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Black Women, Rape, and Resistance- a New History of the Civil Rights Movement from Rosa Parks to the Rise of Black Power

Author: Danielle L. McGuire

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 0307389243

Category: History

Page: 392

View: 1734

A history of America's civil rights movement traces the pivotal influence of sexual violence that victimized African American women for centuries, revealing Rosa Parks's contributions as an anti-rape activist years before her heroic bus protest.
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My Story of the 1965 Selma Voting Rights March

Author: Lynda Blackmon Lowery

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 0147512166

Category: YOUNG ADULT NONFICTION

Page: 144

View: 1996

As the youngest marcher in the 1965 voting rights march from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama, Lynda Blackmon Lowery proved that young adults can be heroes. Jailed nine times before her fifteenth birthday, Lowery fought alongside Martin Luther King, Jr. for the rights of African-Americans. In this memoir, she shows today's young readers what it means to fight nonviolently (even when the police are using violence, as in the Bloody Sunday protest) and how it felt to be part of changing American history.
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The Epic Courtroom Battle That Brought Down the Klan

Author: Laurence Leamer

Publisher: HarperCollins

ISBN: 0062458353

Category: Social Science

Page: 384

View: 3038

The New York Times bestselling author of The Kennedy Women chronicles the powerful and spellbinding true story of a brutal race-based killing in 1981 and subsequent trials that undid one of the most pernicious organizations in American history—the Ku Klux Klan. On a Friday night in March 1981 Henry Hays and James Knowles scoured the streets of Mobile in their car, hunting for a black man. The young men were members of Klavern 900 of the United Klans of America. They were seeking to retaliate after a largely black jury could not reach a verdict in a trial involving a black man accused of the murder of a white man. The two Klansmen found nineteen-year-old Michael Donald walking home alone. Hays and Knowles abducted him, beat him, cut his throat, and left his body hanging from a tree branch in a racially mixed residential neighborhood. Arrested, charged, and convicted, Hays was sentenced to death—the first time in more than half a century that the state of Alabama sentenced a white man to death for killing a black man. On behalf of Michael’s grieving mother, Morris Dees, the legendary civil rights lawyer and cofounder of the Southern Poverty Law Center, filed a civil suit against the members of the local Klan unit involved and the UKA, the largest Klan organization. Charging them with conspiracy, Dees put the Klan on trial, resulting in a verdict that would level a deadly blow to its organization. Based on numerous interviews and extensive archival research, The Lynching brings to life two dramatic trials, during which the Alabama Klan’s motives and philosophy were exposed for the evil they represent. In addition to telling a gripping and consequential story, Laurence Leamer chronicles the KKK and its activities in the second half the twentieth century, and illuminates its lingering effect on race relations in America today. The Lynching includes sixteen pages of black-and-white photographs.
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The Modern Struggle for Voting Rights in America

Author: Ari Berman

Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux

ISBN: 0374711496

Category: History

Page: 384

View: 425

A National Book Critics Circle Award Finalist, Nonfiction A New York Times Notable Book of 2015 A Washington Post Notable Nonfiction Book of 2015 A Boston Globe Best Book of 2015 A Kirkus Reviews Best Nonfiction Book of 2015 An NPR Best Book of 2015 Countless books have been written about the civil rights movement, but far less attention has been paid to what happened after the dramatic passage of the Voting Rights Act (VRA) in 1965 and the turbulent forces it unleashed. Give Us the Ballot tells this story for the first time. In this groundbreaking narrative history, Ari Berman charts both the transformation of American democracy under the VRA and the counterrevolution that has sought to limit voting rights, from 1965 to the present day. The act enfranchised millions of Americans and is widely regarded as the crowning achievement of the civil rights movement. And yet, fifty years later, we are still fighting heated battles over race, representation, and political power, with lawmakers devising new strategies to keep minorities out of the voting booth and with the Supreme Court declaring a key part of the Voting Rights Act unconstitutional. Berman brings the struggle over voting rights to life through meticulous archival research, in-depth interviews with major figures in the debate, and incisive on-the-ground reporting. In vivid prose, he takes the reader from the demonstrations of the civil rights era to the halls of Congress to the chambers of the Supreme Court. At this important moment in history, Give Us the Ballot provides new insight into one of the most vital political and civil rights issues of our time.
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The Uncommon Life of J. L. Chestnut Jr.

Author: J. L. Chestnut, Jr.,Julia Cass

Publisher: Fire Ant Books

ISBN: 9780817354619

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 444

View: 7423

The only black attorney in Selma, Alabama, during 1965 recounts his participation in the civil rights movement and his fight since the 1960s against segregation and prejudice. Reissue.
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Hollywood, Television, and Race During the Civil Rights Struggle

Author: Allison Graham

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN: 9780801874451

Category: History

Page: 240

View: 4493

"In a series of interlocking essays, Graham deftly explores the ways Hollywood filmmakers and television producers tried to reformulate stock southern characters in light of rapidly changing social relations... A fascinating and compelling cultural history that should be of use to a wide array of scholars." -- American Studies
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Memoir of a Civil Rights Lawyer

Author: David Kairys

Publisher: University of Michigan Press

ISBN: 9780472021369

Category: Law

Page: 437

View: 4307

"David Kairys is one of the grand long-distance runners in the struggle for justice in America. His brilliant legal mind and superb lawyerly skills are legendary. This marvelous book is his gift to us!" ---Cornel West, Professor of Religion and African American Studies, Princeton University, and award-winning author of Race Matters Philadelphia Freedom is the spellbinding tale of an idealistic young lawyer coming of age in the political cauldron of the 1960s and 1970s. From his immersion in the civil rights movement to his determined court battles to quell criminal violence by Philadelphia police, Kairys recounts how he helped make history in the city of brotherly love." ---William K. Marimow, Editor and Executive Vice President, Philadelphia Inquirer, and recipient of two Pulitzer Prizes "In the current climate of political deception and the trampling of our civil rights, Kairys's compelling book is a clenched fist, a prayer for social justice and a call to conscience." ---Steve Lopez, Los Angeles Times columnist and former Philadelphia Inquirer columnist "With engaging, insider stories of innovative legal strategies of a truly creative lawyer, this book evokes the ebullient spirit of progressive social change launched in the 1960s and should be read by aspiring and practicing lawyers as well as anyone interested in American social history. Philadelphia Freedom reads like a suspense novel and reveals how novel legal and political thinking can and does make a real difference to individuals and to the quality of justice." ---Martha L. Minow, Jeremiah Smith, Jr. Professor of Law, Harvard University "David Kairys's compelling book properly explains the vital role that civil rights attorneys play in our system of justice." ---Judge John E. Jones III, United States District Court for the Middle District of Pennsylvania, and presiding judge in the landmark Kitzmiller v. Dover Area School District case A memoir that is also a compelling page-turner, Philadelphia Freedom is the poignant, informative, often inspiring account of renowned civil-rights lawyer David Kairys's personal quest for achieving social justice during the turbulent 1960s and 70s. Philadelphia Freedom brings us intimately and directly into Kairys's burgeoning law career and the struggles of the 60s as his professional and private life navigated the turmoil and promise of the civil rights and antiwar movements. Many of the cases Kairys took on involved discrimination and equal protection, freedom of speech, and government malfeasance. Kairys is perhaps most well known for his victory in the Camden 28 draft board case, in which the FBI set up a sting of the Catholic anti-war left at the behest of the highest levels of government. The stories and cases range from nationally important and recognizable---the family of the scientist the CIA unwittingly gave LSD in the 1950s; the leading race discrimination case against the FBI; Dr. Benjamin Spock's First Amendment case before the Supreme Court; the city handgun lawsuits Kairys conceived---to those he encountered in his early work as a public defender. The characters include public figures such as FBI Directors J. Edgar Hoover and Louis Freeh; CIA Director William Colby; Pennsylvania Senator Arlen Specter; New York Attorney General Eliot Spitzer; U.S. Attorneys General Edward Levi and John Mitchell; Georgia Governor Lester Maddox; Pennsylvania Governor, former Philadelphia Mayor, and Democratic National Committee chair Ed Rendell; Philadelphia Mayor and Police Commissioner Frank Rizzo. But some of the most memorable are not well known, involving regular people caught up in the often heartless machinery of the courts and legal system. Though it reads like a novel, with all the elements of character, plot, and suspense, Philadelphia Freedom also has historical significance as a firsthand account of the 1960s and 70s and contains social commentary about race as well as insights and major perspectives on the nature and social role of law. David Kairys is Professor of Law at Beasley School of Law, Temple University. He was a full-time civil rights lawyer from 1968 to 1990.
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The James Reeb Story

Author: Duncan Howlett

Publisher: Unitarian Universalist Association of Congregations

ISBN: 9781558963177

Category: Civil rights workers

Page: 242

View: 7370

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Two Haiku and a Microphone

Author: William H. Bridges, IV,Nina Cornyetz

Publisher: Lexington Books

ISBN: 1498505481

Category: Social Science

Page: 294

View: 2345

This book analyzes the complex conversations taking place in texts of all sorts traveling between Africans, African diasporas, and Japanese across disciplinary, geographic, racial, ethnic, and cultural borders.
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The Liberal Case for Teaching Religion in the Public Schools

Author: Walter Feinberg,Richard A Layton

Publisher: University of Michigan Press

ISBN: 0472052071

Category: Education

Page: 164

View: 7394

A case for teaching classes on world religion and the Bible in public schools
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