A History of Design Criticism

Author: Alice Twemlow

Publisher: MIT Press

ISBN: 0262344467

Category: Design

Page: 312

View: 8028

Product design criticism operates at the very brink of the landfill site, salvaging some products with praise but consigning others to its depths through condemnation or indifference. When a designed product's usefulness is past, the public happily discards it to make room for the next new thing. Criticism rarely deals with how a product might be used, or not used, over time; it is more likely to play the enabler, encouraging our addiction to consumption. With Sifting the Trash, Alice Twemlow offers an especially timely reexamination of the history of product design criticism through the metaphors and actualities of the product as imminent junk and the consumer as junkie. Twemlow explores five key moments over the past sixty years of product design criticism. From the mid-1950s through the 1960s, for example, critics including Reyner Banham, Deborah Allen, and Richard Hamilton wrote about the ways people actually used design, and invented a new kind of criticism. At the 1970 International Design Conference in Aspen, environmental activists protested the design establishment's lack of political engagement. In the 1980s, left-leaning cultural critics introduced ideology to British design criticism. In the 1990s, dueling London exhibits offered alternative views of contemporary design. And in the early 2000s, professional critics were challenged by energetic design bloggers. Through the years, Twemlow shows, critics either sifted the trash and assigned value or attempted to detect, diagnose, and treat the sickness of a consumer society.
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A History of Design Criticism

Author: Alice Twemlow

Publisher: MIT Press

ISBN: 0262035987

Category: Design

Page: 312

View: 8589

Outgrowth of the author's thesis (doctoral--Royal College of Art, 2013) under the title: Purposes, poetics, and publics: the shifting dynamics of design criticism in the US and UK, 1955-2007.
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Author: Andy Mulligan

Publisher: David Fickling Books

ISBN: 0375898433

Category: Young Adult Fiction

Page: 240

View: 774

In an unnamed Third World country, in the not-so-distant future, three “dumpsite boys” make a living picking through the mountains of garbage on the outskirts of a large city. One unlucky-lucky day, Raphael finds something very special and very mysterious. So mysterious that he decides to keep it, even when the city police offer a handsome reward for its return. That decision brings with it terrifying consequences, and soon the dumpsite boys must use all of their cunning and courage to stay ahead of their pursuers. It’s up to Raphael, Gardo, and Rat—boys who have no education, no parents, no homes, and no money—to solve the mystery and right a terrible wrong. Andy Mulligan has written a powerful story about unthinkable poverty—and the kind of hope and determination that can transcend it. With twists and turns, unrelenting action, and deep, raw emotion, Trash is a heart-pounding, breath-holding novel.
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The Story of the Recycled Orchestra of Paraguay

Author: Susan Hood

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1481430955

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 40

View: 9112

A town built on a landfill. A community in need of hope. A girl with a dream. A man with a vision. An ingenious idea.
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Author: Leonard B. Scott

Publisher: Ballantine Books

ISBN: 0307801438

Category: Fiction

Page: 352

View: 6363

Ty is the grunt. Point man for his platoon. Jason is the favored one: a football hero picked for officer training school who leads his men into a slaughter ground from which most of them will never return. Ty and Jason -- Oklahoma brothers different in character, yet close in soul -- are about to meet in the Battle of Dak To, upon the blood-drenched sides of Hill 875. From the Trade Paperback edition.
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Author: John Milliken Thompson

Publisher: Other Press, LLC

ISBN: 1590514440

Category: Fiction

Page: 349

View: 5301

On an early spring morning in Richmond, Virginia, in the year 1885, a young pregnant woman is found floating in the city reservoir. It appears that she has committed suicide, but there are curious clues at the scene that suggest foul play. As the identity of the woman, Lillie, is revealed, her dark family history comes to light. Soon the investigation focuses on her tumultuous affair with her cousin, Tommie Cluverius.--From book flap.
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Author: Rebecca Kennedy

Publisher: Dorrance Publishing

ISBN: 1480906859

Category: Fiction

Page: 394

View: 3709

Straight out of the Louisiana swamp comes this colorful tale of greed, love, voodoo, and the dark secrets of family. The lives of generations of families become intertwined as descendants of an Indian tribe work to regain the lost wealth of their ancestors. Colorful characters populate scenes from the antebellum South to the modern day, including bayou priestesses, herb healers, plantation owners, twin sisters, sharecroppers, and Jake, the canine who's more than a dog. Will bonds be broken? Will wealth be restored? Or will the forces of voodoo curse these families forever? About the Author Beginning as a church organist at age sixteen, Rebecca Kennedy has held numerous jobs but always wanted to write a novel. She found inspiration for this book in college classes and in the stories told by her Southern-born husband, who is one-eighth Cherokee Indian. She enjoys making cards for family and friends, crocheting, and working in the yard with her husband of 36 years. Born in 1948 in Western Pennsylvania, she now lives in Georgia.
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A Trilogy of Death, Life and Renewal

Author: Judith Pedersen-Benn

Publisher: Hillcrest Publishing Group

ISBN: 1634130537

Category: Fiction

Page: 352

View: 8327

Adrift in the Wild and hoping to loosen the ties that bound them to society, a small group discovers what they did not know they knew. We experience the journey with them toward a nurturing, sustaining "life-way" through the eyes of a young girl blessed with the gift of envisioning the future. Faced with re-learning ancient human ways that nurture shared leadership, equality, and non-violence, the group is forced to depend on the "knowing" held in their genetic memory. Step by step the journey takes them into the expansive web of the Wild. Ultimately, they are forced to create a new "heroic story," one that guides them to oppose those who would destroy their newfound humanity and community. Garnering the power of collective action, collective creativity, and collective courage, they rediscover the power of peaceful resistance.
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Life and Labor on Rio's Garbage Dump

Author: Kathleen M. Millar

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780822370505

Category: History

Page: 248

View: 9976

In Reclaiming the Discarded Kathleen Millar offers a comprehensive ethnography of Jardim Gramacho, a sprawling garbage dump on the outskirts of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, where self-employed workers, known as catadores, collect recyclable materials and ultimately generate new modes of living within the precarious conditions of urban poverty.
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Author: Cari Luna

Publisher: Tin House Books

ISBN: 193563965X

Category: Fiction

Page: 392

View: 8306

Inspired by the midnineties squat evictions on New York's Lower East Side, Cari Luna's gritty debut novel vividly imagines the lives of five squatters, showing readers a life that few people, including New Yorkers who passed the squats every day, know about or understand. In the midnineties, New York’s Lower East Side contained a city within its shadows: a community of squatters who staked their claims on abandoned tenements and lived and worked within their own parameters, accountable to no one but each other. On May 30, 1995, the NYPD rolled an armored tank down East Thirteenth Street and hundreds of police officers in riot gear mobilized to evict a few dozen squatters from two buildings. With gritty prose and vivid descriptions, Cari Luna’s debut novel, The Revolution of Every Day, imagines the lives of five squatters from that time. But almost more threatening than the city lawyers and the private developers trying to evict them are the rifts within their community. Amelia, taken in by Gerrit as a teen runaway seven years earlier, is now pregnant by his best friend, Steve. Anne, married to Steve, is questioning her commitment to the squatter lifestyle. Cat, a fading legend of the downtown scene and unwitting leader of one of the squats, succumbs to heroin. The misunderstandings and assumptions, the secrets and the dissolution of the hope that originally bound these five threaten to destroy their homes as surely as the city’s battering rams. Amid this chaos, Amelia struggles with her ambivalence about becoming a mother while knowing that her pregnancy has given her fellow squatters a renewed purpose to their fight—securing the squats for the next generation. Told from multiple points of view, The Revolution of Every Day shows readers a life that few people, including the New Yorkers who passed the squats every day, know about or understand.
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Author: Boston Teran

Publisher: Catapult

ISBN: 1582439486

Category: Fiction

Page: 258

View: 768

Mexico, 1910. The landscape pulses with the force of the upcoming revolution, an atmosphere rich in opportunity for a criminal such as Rawbone. His fortune arrives across the haze of the Sierra Blanca in the form of a truck loaded with weapons, an easy sell to those financing a bloodletting. But Rawbones plan spins against him, and he soon finds himself at the Mexican-American border and in the hands of the Bureau of Investigation. He is offered a chance for immunity, but only if he agrees to proceed with his scheme to deliver the truck and its goods to the Mexican oil fields while under the command of Agent John Lourdes. Rawbone sees no other option and agrees to the deal—but he fails to recognize the true identity of Agent Lourdes, a man from deep within his past. As they work to expose the criminal network at the core of the revolution, it is clear their journey into the tarred desert is a push toward a certain ruin, and the history lurking between the criminal and agent may seal their fates.
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Author: Lois Winston,Emma Carlyle

Publisher: Lois Winston

ISBN: 0985968907

Category: Fiction

Page: 360

View: 5529

One by one members of the Montgomery family have died in tragic accidents. Photographer Sarah Montgomery is the last surviving member of the aeronautics dynasty. After the death of her beloved grandfather, she accepts the fact that her husband never loved her and initiates divorce proceeding. On the way home from the lawyer’s office, Sarah is hit by a cab. Days later she awakens in the hospital and has no idea who she is. Industrialist Trent Caldwell harbors guilt over his wife’s death. A passenger in the cab that struck Sarah, he now feels responsible for her injuries. When no one steps forth to identify the woman in the hospital, he arranges for Mrs. Kearn, his housekeeper, to care for her in his home. Seeing in Sarah someone who just might draw Trent out of the darkness he’s succumbed to since his wife’s death, Mrs. Kearn sets about playing matchmaker. But the Montgomery family deaths weren’t accidents. Someone harbors a deadly secret and using skills perfected as a youthful IRA operative, has systematically eliminated the family out of a need for revenge. Realizing Sarah’s true identity, the assassin now has one more kill to make in order to fulfill a promise made long ago. Keywords: vengeful, urban, amnesia, billionaire, second chance, murder, love triangle
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Universal Design and the Politics of Disability

Author: Aimi Hamraie

Publisher: U of Minnesota Press

ISBN: 1452955565

Category: Architecture

Page: 336

View: 9022

“All too often,” wrote disabled architect Ronald Mace, “designers don’t take the needs of disabled and elderly people into account.” Building Access investigates twentieth-century strategies for designing the world with disability in mind. Commonly understood in terms of curb cuts, automatic doors, Braille signs, and flexible kitchens, Universal Design purported to create a built environment for everyone, not only the average citizen. But who counts as “everyone,” Aimi Hamraie asks, and how can designers know? Blending technoscience studies and design history with critical disability, race, and feminist theories, Building Access interrogates the historical, cultural, and theoretical contexts for these questions, offering a groundbreaking critical history of Universal Design. Hamraie reveals that the twentieth-century shift from “design for the average” to “design for all” took place through liberal political, economic, and scientific structures concerned with defining the disabled user and designing in its name. Tracing the co-evolution of accessible design for disabled veterans, a radical disability maker movement, disability rights law, and strategies for diversifying the architecture profession, Hamraie shows that Universal Design was not just an approach to creating new products or spaces, but also a sustained, understated activist movement challenging dominant understandings of disability in architecture, medicine, and society. Illustrated with a wealth of rare archival materials, Building Access brings together scientific, social, and political histories in what is not only the pioneering critical account of Universal Design but also a deep engagement with the politics of knowing, making, and belonging in twentieth-century United States.
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Digital Games and the Simulation of History

Author: Matthew Wilhelm Kapell,Andrew B.R. Elliott

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing USA

ISBN: 1623568242

Category: Social Science

Page: 400

View: 3895

Game Studies is a rapidly growing area of contemporary scholarship, yet volumes in the area have tended to focus on more general issues. With Playing with the Past, game studies is taken to the next level by offering a specific and detailed analysis of one area of digital game play -- the representation of history. The collection focuses on the ways in which gamers engage with, play with, recreate, subvert, reverse and direct the historical past, and what effect this has on the ways in which we go about constructing the present or imagining a future. What can World War Two strategy games teach us about the reality of this complex and multifaceted period? Do the possibilities of playing with the past change the way we understand history? If we embody a colonialist's perspective to conquer 'primitive' tribes in Colonization, does this privilege a distinct way of viewing history as benevolent intervention over imperialist expansion? The fusion of these two fields allows the editors to pose new questions about the ways in which gamers interact with their game worlds. Drawing these threads together, the collection concludes by asking whether digital games - which represent history or historical change - alter the way we, today, understand history itself.
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Waste, Material Cultures, Social Justice

Author: Stephanie Foote,Elizabeth Mazzolini

Publisher: MIT Press

ISBN: 0262517825

Category: Science

Page: 291

View: 612

An examination of how garbage reveals the relationships between the global and the local, the economic and the ecological, and the historical and the contemporary. Garbage, considered both materially and culturally, elicits mixed responses. Our responsibility toward the objects we love and then discard is entangled with our responsibility toward the systems that make those objects. Histories of the Dustheap uses garbage, waste, and refuse to investigate the relationships between various systems--the local and the global, the economic and the ecological, the historical and the contemporary--and shows how this most democratic reality produces identities, social relations, and policies. The contributors first consider garbage in subjective terms, examining "toxic autobiography" by residents of Love Canal, the intersection of public health and women's rights, and enviroblogging. They explore the importance of place, with studies of post-Katrina soil contamination in New Orleans, e-waste disposal in Bloomington, Indiana, and garbage on Mount Everest. And finally, they look at cultural contradictions as objects hover between waste and desirability, examining Milwaukee's efforts to sell its sludge as fertilizer, the plastics industry's attempt to wrap plastic bottles and bags in the mantle of freedom of choice, and the idea of obsolescence in the animated film The Brave Little Toaster. Histories of the Dustheap offers a range of perspectives on a variety of incarnations of garbage, inviting the reader to consider garbage in a way that goes beyond the common "buy green" discourse that empowers individuals while limiting environmental activism to consumerist practices.
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History, Theory, Criticism

Author: Victor Margolin

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226505145

Category: Art

Page: 291

View: 6551

Although design infuses every object in the material world and gives form to immaterial processes as well, it is only recently that design itself has become the focus of intellectual debate. In Design Discourse, Victor Margolin gathers together a body of new writing in the emerging field of design studies. The contributors argue in different ways for a rethinking of design in light of its cultural significance and its powerful position in today's society.
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Author: Matt Pelfrey

Publisher: Original Works Publishing

ISBN: 1934962120

Category:

Page: 101

View: 5590

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A New Look at Today's Evangelical Church in the Light of Early Christianity

Author: David W. Bercot

Publisher: Scroll Publishing Co.

ISBN: 9780924722004

Category: Religion

Page: 190

View: 7744

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Performance Art, Carnival and the Grotesque Body

Author: Francesca Granata

Publisher: I.B.Tauris

ISBN: 1784533793

Category: SOCIAL SCIENCE

Page: 217

View: 5762

Experimental Fashion traces the proliferation of the grotesque and carnivalesque within contemporary fashion and the close relation between fashion and performance art, from Lady Gaga's raw meat dress to Leigh Bowery's performance style. Francesca Granata examines the designers and performance artists at the turn of the twenty-first century whose work challenges established codes of what represents the fashionable body. These innovative people, she argues, make their challenges through dynamic strategies of parody, humor, and inversion. Experimental Fashion explores the experimental work of modern designers such as Georgina Godley, Bernhard Willhelm, Rei Kawakubo, and fashion designer, performance artist, and club figure, Leigh Bowery. It also discusses the increased centrality of experimental fashion through the pop phenomenon, Lady Gaga.
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