Women and the Politics of Rape and Lynching

Author: Crystal Nicole Feimster

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 9780674035621

Category: History

Page: 314

View: 7373

Between 1880 and 1930, close to 200 women were murdered by lynch mobs in the American South. Many more were tarred and feathered, burned, whipped, or raped. In this brutal world of white supremacist politics and patriarchy, a world violently divided by race, gender, and class, black and white women defended themselves and challenged the male power brokers. Crystal Feimster breaks new ground in her story of the racial politics of the postbellum South by focusing on the volatile issue of sexual violence. Pairing the lives of two Southern womenâe"Ida B. Wells, who fearlessly branded lynching a white tool of political terror against southern blacks, and Rebecca Latimer Felton, who urged white men to prove their manhood by lynching black men accused of raping white womenâe"Feimster makes visible the ways in which black and white women sought protection and political power in the New South. While Wells was black and Felton was white, both were journalists, temperance women, suffragists, and anti-rape activists. By placing their concerns at the center of southern politics, Feimster illuminates a critical and novel aspect of southern racial and sexual dynamics. Despite being on opposite sides of the lynching question, both Wells and Felton sought protection from sexual violence and political empowerment for women. Southern Horrors provides a startling view into the Jim Crow South where the precarious and subordinate position of women linked black and white anti-rape activists together in fragile political alliances. It is a story that reveals how the complex drama of political power, race, and sex played out in the lives of Southern women.
Read More

Roman

Author: John M. Coetzee

Publisher: Distribooks

ISBN: 9783596150984

Category: Fiction

Page: 285

View: 4576

Ein Literaturprofessor fällt wegen einer Affäre mit einer Studentin in Ungnade, zieht sich auf die entlegene Farm seiner Tochter zurück und erlebt dort einen Alptraum der Gewalt.
Read More

Die USA und ihre zornigen Männer

Author: Michael Kimmel

Publisher: Orell Füssli Verlag

ISBN: 3280038987

Category: Social Science

Page: 320

View: 3541

Die Supermacht USA befindet sich in einer tiefen Identitätskrise. Einst berühmt für ihre pragmatische Kompromissbereitschaft stehen sich Republikaner und Demokraten unversöhnlich gegenüber, gewinnen ehemals politische Randgruppen wie die Tea Party enormen politischen und gesellschaftlichen Einfluss. Das Land radikalisiert sich und die weiße männliche Bevölkerung spielt dabei eine entscheidende Rolle. Wer sind die zornigen weißen Amerikaner, die ihren "Way of Life" so gefährdet sehen, dass sie zum radikalen Widerstand gegen jeden bereit sind, der ihre Anschauungen nicht teilt? Woher rührt die Wut auf Frauenemanzipation und Immigranten, auf Farbige und Homosexuelle, auf die Gleichstellung der Geschlechter und generell auf "die im Weißen Haus"? Dieses Buch zeichnet das beklemmende Porträt einer vorrangig männlichen Bewegung, deren Angst vor dem eigenen Bedeutungsverlust, vor dem Verlust amerikanischer Männlichkeit und Dominanz nicht nur die kommenden Präsidentschaftswahlen bestimmen wird, sondern darüber hinaus auch die amerikanische Außenpolitik - also uns.
Read More

The Politics of Memory

Author: Evelyn M. Simien

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 1137001224

Category: History

Page: 184

View: 1396

The authors probe the reasons and circumstances surrounding the death and torture of African American female victims, relying on such methodological approaches as comparative historical work, content and media analysis, as well as literary criticism.
Read More

The Long Reconstruction of Popular Politics in the South, 1861-1908

Author: Gregory Downs

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 080787776X

Category: History

Page: 360

View: 4013

In this highly original study, Gregory Downs argues that the most American of wars, the Civil War, created a seemingly un-American popular politics, rooted not in independence but in voluntary claims of dependence. Through an examination of the pleas and petitions of ordinary North Carolinians, Declarations of Dependence contends that the Civil War redirected, not destroyed, claims of dependence by exposing North Carolinians to the expansive but unsystematic power of Union and Confederate governments, and by loosening the legal ties that bound them to husbands, fathers, and masters. Faced with anarchy during the long reconstruction of government authority, people turned fervently to the government for protection and sustenance, pleading in fantastic, intimate ways for attention. This personalistic, or what Downs calls patronal, politics allowed for appeals from subordinate groups like freed blacks and poor whites, and also bound people emotionally to newly expanding postwar states. Downs's argument rewrites the history of the relationship between Americans and their governments, showing the deep roots of dependence, the complex impact of the Civil War upon popular politics, and the powerful role of Progressivism and segregation in submerging a politics of dependence that--in new form--rose again in the New Deal and persists today.
Read More

Sexual Profiling and the Illusion of Gender

Author: Michèle Alexandre

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134068743

Category: Political Science

Page: 242

View: 6850

Michèle Alexandre’s innovative study examines how sexual profiling represses, oppresses, and hinders various aspects of life for both genders, and explores the ways in which the law and the community can help eradicate the practice of sexual profiling. Alexandre defines "sexploitation" as the perpetuation of myths and stereotypical notions regarding men and women in order to further an agenda of oppression and subordination in certain spheres of society. The most popular means through which this sexploitation is achieved is through a method Alexandre coins as "sexual profiling." She argues that sexual profiling ultimately stifles the growth of our society by creating inefficient as well as oppressive systems, and that its eradication can help increase the productivity as well as the morale of society. Alexandre opens the book by exploring in detail the various ways in which normative views of gender are constructed and perpetuated through media and societal norms. She then focuses on the ways in which recent legal opinions and developments contribute to perpetuate these restrictive and oppressive norms. Finally, Alexandre outlines a plan to help eliminate the presence of these destructive norms and attitudes from different sectors of society.
Read More

Slavery, Emancipation, and Citizenship in the Native American South

Author: Barbara Krauthamer

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 1469607115

Category: Social Science

Page: 232

View: 2392

From the late eighteenth century through the end of the Civil War, Choctaw and Chickasaw Indians bought, sold, and owned Africans and African Americans as slaves, a fact that persisted after the tribes' removal from the Deep South to Indian Territory. The tribes formulated racial and gender ideologies that justified this practice and marginalized free black people in the Indian nations well after the Civil War and slavery had ended. Through the end of the nineteenth century, ongoing conflicts among Choctaw, Chickasaw, and U.S. lawmakers left untold numbers of former slaves and their descendants in the two Indian nations without citizenship in either the Indian nations or the United States. In this groundbreaking study, Barbara Krauthamer rewrites the history of southern slavery, emancipation, race, and citizenship to reveal the centrality of Native American slaveholders and the black people they enslaved. Krauthamer's examination of slavery and emancipation highlights the ways Indian women's gender roles changed with the arrival of slavery and changed again after emancipation and reveals complex dynamics of race that shaped the lives of black people and Indians both before and after removal.
Read More

Author: Javier Auyero,Philippe Bourgois,Nancy Scheper-Hughes

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0190221488

Category: Social Science

Page: 352

View: 6376

In the Americas, debates around issues of citizen's public safety--from debates that erupt after highly publicized events, such as the shootings of Jordan Davis and Trayvon Martin, to those that recurrently dominate the airwaves in Latin America--are dominated by members of the middle and upper-middle classes. However, a cursory count of the victims of urban violence in the Americas reveals that the people suffering the most from violence live, and die, at the lowest of the socio-symbolic order, at the margins of urban societies. The inhabitants of the urban margins are hardly ever heard in discussions about public safety. They live in danger but the discourse about violence and risk belongs to, is manufactured and manipulated by, others--others who are prone to view violence at the urban margins as evidence of a cultural, or racial, defect, rather than question violence's relationship to economic and political marginalization. As a result, the experience of interpersonal violence among the urban poor becomes something unspeakable, and the everyday fear and trauma lived in relegated territories is constantly muted and denied. This edited volume seeks to counteract this pernicious tendency by putting under the ethnographic microscope--and making public--the way in which violence is lived and acted upon in the urban peripheries. It features cutting-edge ethnographic research on the role of violence in the lives of the urban poor in South, Central, and North America, and sheds light on the suffering that violence produces and perpetuates, as well as the individual and collective responses that violence generates, among those living at the urban margins of the Americas.
Read More

The Life of Septima Clark

Author: Katherine Mellen Charron

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

ISBN: 0807837601

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 480

View: 3516

Civil rights activist Septima Poinsette Clark (1898-1987) developed a citizenship education program that enabled tens of thousands of African Americans to register to vote and to link the power of the ballot to concrete strategies for individual and communal empowerment. Clark, who began her own teaching career in 1916, grounded her approach in the philosophy and practice of southern black activist educators in the decades leading up to the 1950s and 1960s, and then trained a committed cadre of grassroots black women to lead this literacy revolution in community stores, beauty shops, and churches throughout the South. In this engaging biography, Katherine Charron tells the story of Clark, from her coming of age in the South Carolina lowcountry to her activism with the Southern Christian Leadership Conference in the movement's heyday. The enhanced electronic version of the book draws from archives, libraries, and the author's personal collection and includes nearly 100 letters, documents, photographs, newspaper articles, and interview excerpts, embedding each in the text where it will be most meaningful. Featuring more than 60 audio clips (more than 2.5 hours total) from oral history interviews with 15 individuals, including Clark herself, the enhanced e-book redefines the idea of the "talking book." Watch the video below to see a demonstration of the enhanced ebook:
Read More

U.S. Anti-imperialism from the Founding Era to the Age of Terrorism

Author: Ian Tyrrell,Jay Sexton

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN: 0801455693

Category: History

Page: 312

View: 6742

Across the course of American history, imperialism and anti-imperialism have been awkwardly paired as influences on the politics, culture, and diplomacy of the United States. The Declaration of Independence, after all, is an anti-imperial document, cataloguing the sins of the metropolitan government against the colonies. With the Revolution, and again in 1812, the nation stood against the most powerful empire in the world and declared itself independent. As noted by Ian Tyrrell and Jay Sexton, however, American "anti-imperialism was clearly selective, geographically, racially, and constitutionally." Empire's Twin broadens our conception of anti-imperialist actors, ideas, and actions; it charts this story across the range of American history, from the Revolution to our own era; and it opens up the transnational and global dimensions of American anti-imperialism. By tracking the diverse manifestations of American anti-imperialism, this book highlights the different ways in which historians can approach it in their research and teaching. The contributors cover a wide range of subjects, including the discourse of anti-imperialism in the Early Republic and Civil War, anti-imperialist actions in the U.S. during the Mexican Revolution, the anti-imperial dimensions of early U.S. encounters in the Middle East, and the transnational nature of anti-imperialist public sentiment during the Cold War and beyond. Contributors: Laura Belmonte, Oklahoma State University; Robert Buzzanco, University of Houston; Julian Go, Boston University; Alan Knight, University of Oxford; Ussama Makdisi, Rice University; Erez Manela, Harvard University; Peter Onuf, Robert H. Smith International Center for Jefferson Studies, Monticello, and University of Virginia; Jeffrey Ostler, University of Oregon; Patricia Schechter, Portland State University; Jay Sexton, University of Oxford; Ian Tyrrell, University of New South Wales
Read More

Photography and the African American Freedom Struggle

Author: Leigh Raiford

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 080788233X

Category: Social Science

Page: 312

View: 5268

In Imprisoned in a Luminous Glare, Leigh Raiford argues that over the past one hundred years, activists in the black freedom struggle have used photographic imagery both to gain political recognition and to develop a different visual vocabulary about black lives. Offering readings of the use of photography in the anti-lynching movement, the civil rights movement, and the black power movement, Imprisoned in a Luminous Glare focuses on key transformations in technology, society, and politics to understand the evolution of photography's deployment in capturing white oppression, black resistance, and African American life.
Read More

Masseninhaftierung und Rassismus in den USA

Author: Michelle Alexander

Publisher: Antje Kunstmann

ISBN: 3956141598

Category: Political Science

Page: 352

View: 8420

Die Wahl von Barack Obama im November 2008 markierte einen historischen Wendepunkt in den USA: Der erste schwarze Präsident schien für eine postrassistische Gesellschaft und den Triumph der Bürgerrechtsbewegung zu stehen. Doch die Realität in den USA ist eine andere. Obwohl die Rassentrennung, die in den sogenannten Jim-Crow-Gesetzen festgeschrieben war, im Zuge der Bürgerrechtsbewegung abgeschafft wurde, sitzt heute ein unfassbar hoher Anteil der schwarzen Bevölkerung im Gefängnis oder ist lebenslang als kriminell gebrandmarkt. Ein Status, der die Leute zu Bürgern zweiter Klasse macht, indem er sie ihrer grundsätzlichsten Rechte beraubt – ganz ähnlich den explizit rassistischen Diskriminierungen der Jim-Crow-Ära. In ihrem Buch, das in Amerika eine breite Debatte ausgelöst hat, argumentiert Michelle Alexander, dass die USA ihr rassistisches System nach der Bürgerrechtsbewegung nicht abgeschafft, sondern lediglich umgestaltet haben. Da unter dem perfiden Deckmantel des »War on Drugs« überproportional junge männliche Schwarze und ihre Communities kriminalisiert werden, funktioniert das drakonische Strafjustizsystem der USA heute wie das System rassistischer Kontrolle von gestern: ein neues Jim Crow.
Read More

A Theology for Bystanders

Author: Elisabeth T. Vasko

Publisher: Fortress Press

ISBN: 145149419X

Category: Religion

Page: 192

View: 6694

Theological conversations about violence have typically framed the discussion in terms of victim and perpetrator. Such work, while important, only addresses part of the problem. Comprehensive theological and pastoral responses to violence must also address the role of collective passivity in the face of human denigration. Given the pervasiveness of inaction—whether in the form of denial, willful ignorance, or silent complicity—a theological reflection on violence that holds bystanders accountable, especially those who occupy social sites of privilege, is long overdue. In Beyond Apathy, Elisabeth T. Vasko utilizes resources within the Christian tradition to examine the theological significance of bystander participation in patterns of violence and violation within contemporary Western culture, giving particular attention to the social issues of bullying, white racism, and sexual violence. In doing so, she constructs a theology of redeeming grace for bystanders to violence that foregrounds the significance of social action in bringing about God’s basileia.
Read More

Author: Annelise Orleck

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1135089051

Category: History

Page: 244

View: 719

In this enthralling narrative, Annelise Orleck chronicles the history of the American women's movement from the nineteenth century to the present. Starting with an incisive introduction that calls for a reconceptualization of American feminist history to encompass multiple streams of women's activism, she weaves the personal with the political, vividly evoking the events and people who participated in our era's most far-reaching social revolutions. In short, thematic chapters, Orleck enables readers to understand the impact of women's activism, and highlights how feminism has flourished through much of the past century within social movements that have too often been treated as completely separate. Showing that women’s activism has taken many forms, has intersected with issues of class and race, and has continued during periods of backlash, Rethinking American Women’s Activism is a perfect introduction to the subject for anyone interested in women’s history and social movements.
Read More

The Fight for Atlanta's Booker T. Washington High School and the Roots of Black Protest Politics

Author: Jay Winston Driskell Jr.

Publisher: University of Virginia Press

ISBN: 0813936152

Category: Social Science

Page: 320

View: 1538

In 1919 the NAACP organized a voting bloc powerful enough to compel the city of Atlanta to budget $1.5 million for the construction of schools for black students. This victory would have been remarkable in any era, but in the context of the Jim Crow South it was revolutionary. Schooling Jim Crow tells the story of this little-known campaign, which happened less than thirteen years after the Atlanta race riot of 1906 and just weeks before a wave of anti-black violence swept the nation in the summer after the end of World War I. Despite the constant threat of violence, Atlanta’s black voters were able to force the city to build five black grammar schools and Booker T. Washington High School, the city’s first publicly funded black high school. Schooling Jim Crow reveals how they did it and why it matters. In this pathbreaking book, Jay Driskell explores the changes in black political consciousness that made the NAACP’s grassroots campaign possible at a time when most black southerners could not vote, let alone demand schools. He reveals how black Atlantans transformed a reactionary politics of respectability into a militant force for change. Contributing to this militancy were understandings of class and gender transformed by decades of racially segregated urban development, the 1906 Atlanta race riot, Georgia’s disfranchisement campaign of 1908, and the upheavals of World War I. On this cultural foundation, black Atlantans built a new urban black politics that would become the model for the NAACP’s political strategy well into the twentieth century.
Read More

die verborgene Geschichte des revolutionären Atlantiks

Author: Peter Linebaugh,Marcus Rediker

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9783935936651

Category:

Page: 427

View: 9759

Read More

Anatomie einer Fälschung

Author: Hadassa Ben-Itto

Publisher: Aufbau Digital

ISBN: 3841206298

Category: History

Page: 432

View: 784

Die unglaubliche Geschichte einer Fälschung Die "jüdische Weltverschwörung" dient bis heute als Erklärung für jede nur erdenkliche Katastrophe: Kriege, Revolutionen, Wirtschaftskrisen, Börsenkräche, Terrorismus, Aids. Und immer wieder laufen die Fäden bei einem vermeintlich authentischen Buch zusammen: den "Protokollen der Weisen von Zion", deren Entstehungs- und Wirkungsgeschichte hier packend erzählt wird. 1934 kommt es in Bern zum Prozeß gegen die "Protokolle", den Ben-Itto anhand von Gerichtsakten und noch lebenden Zeugen rekonstruiert.
Read More

Roman

Author: Harper Lee

Publisher: DVA

ISBN: 3641179491

Category: Fiction

Page: 320

View: 1087

Sensationeller Manuskriptfund - das literarische Ereignis im Sommer 2015 Harper Lee hat bisher nur einen Roman veröffentlicht, doch dieser hat der US-amerikanischen Schriftstellerin Weltruhm eingebracht: „Wer die Nachtigall stört“, erschienen 1960 und ein Jahr später mit dem renommierten Pulitzer-Preis ausgezeichnet, ist mit 40 Millionen verkauften Exemplaren und Übersetzungen in mehr als 40 Sprachen eines der meistgelesenen Bücher weltweit. Mit „Gehe hin, stelle einen Wächter“ – zeitlich vor „Wer die Nachtigall stört“ entstanden – erscheint nun das Erstlingswerk. Das Manuskript wurde nie veröffentlicht und galt als verschollen – bis es eine Freundin der inzwischen 89-jährigen Autorin im September 2014 fand. In „Gehe hin, stelle einen Wächter“ treffen wir die geliebten Charaktere aus „Wer die Nachtigall stört“ wieder, 20 Jahre später: Eine inzwischen erwachsene Jean Louise Finch, „Scout“, kehrt zurück nach Maycomb und sieht sich in der kleinen Stadt in Alabama, die sie so geprägt hat, mit gesellschaftspolitischen Problemen konfrontiert, die nicht zuletzt auch ihr Verhältnis zu ihrem Vater Atticus infrage stellen. Ein Roman über die turbulenten Ereignisse im Amerika der 1950er-Jahre, der zugleich ein faszinierend neues Licht auf den Klassiker wirft. Bewegend, humorvoll und überwältigend – ein Roman, der seinem Vorgänger in nichts nachsteht.
Read More