The Peasants' Revolt of 1381

Author: Daniel Jones

Publisher: HarperCollins UK

ISBN: N.A

Category: Great Britain

Page: 238

View: 2791

Summer of Blood breaks new ground in its portrayal of the personalities and politics of the bloody days of June 1381. Breathing life into one of British history's most colourful yet under-explored episodes, Dan Jones recreates the dangerous world of the fourteenth century: a time when pain, squalor, misery and disease formed the fabric of daily life. Yet this was also an era of humanity, charity and social responsibility, one which people genuinely believed could be made better.
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England's First Revolution

Author: Dan Jones

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 1101993006

Category: History

Page: 256

View: 2531

From the New York Times bestselling author of The Plantagenets and a top authority on the historical events that inspired Game of Thrones, a vivid, blood-soaked account of one of the most famous rebellions in history—the first mass uprising by the people of England against their feudal masters In the summer of 1381, ravaged by poverty and oppressed by taxes, the people of England rose up and demanded that their voices be heard. A ragtag army, led by the mysteri­ous Wat Tyler and the visionary preacher John Ball, rose up against the fourteen-year-old Richard II and his most powerful lords and knights, who risked their property and their lives in a desperate battle to save the English crown. Dan Jones brings this incendiary moment to life and captures both the idealism and brutality of that fate­ful summer, when a brave group of men and women dared to challenge their overlords, demand that they be treated equally, and fight for freedom. Praise for Summer of Blood: “Hot, brave and reeking with gore.” —The Times (London) “Sound scholarship and sexy writing make this . . . essential reading.” —The Independent (London), Book of the Year Praise for The Plantagenets: “A real life Game of Thrones, as dramatic and blood-soaked as any work of fantasy . . . Fast-paced and accessible, The Plantagenets is old-fashioned storytelling and will be particularly appreciated by those who like their history red in tooth and claw.” —The Wall Street Journal From the Trade Paperback edition.
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Author: Dan Jones

Publisher: HarperCollins UK

ISBN: 0007331487

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 1454

Revolt and upheaval in medieval Britain by a brilliant new narrative historian. ‘Summer of Blood’ breaks new ground in its portrayal of the personalities and politics of the bloody days of June 1381.
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Author: Ed Russo

Publisher: Lulu Press, Inc

ISBN: 1329187040

Category: Fiction

Page: N.A

View: 2124

The vampire Tony Perillo finds himself caught up in a dangerous passion that not only is dangerous to his life, but also in danger of becoming the monster he despises. As he gets caught up in a web of lustful passion, he finds himself trapped in the clutches of a sadistic monster, a beautiful seductive vampire with secrets, which he soon discovers his own dark desires.
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The Summer of 1919 and the Awakening of Black America

Author: Cameron McWhirter

Publisher: Henry Holt and Company

ISBN: 9781429972932

Category: History

Page: 368

View: 6680

A narrative history of America's deadliest episode of race riots and lynchings After World War I, black Americans fervently hoped for a new epoch of peace, prosperity, and equality. Black soldiers believed their participation in the fight to make the world safe for democracy finally earned them rights they had been promised since the close of the Civil War. Instead, an unprecedented wave of anti-black riots and lynchings swept the country for eight months. From April to November of 1919, the racial unrest rolled across the South into the North and the Midwest, even to the nation's capital. Millions of lives were disrupted, and hundreds of lives were lost. Blacks responded by fighting back with an intensity and determination never seen before. Red Summer is the first narrative history written about this epic encounter. Focusing on the worst riots and lynchings—including those in Chicago, Washington, D.C., Charleston, Omaha and Knoxville—Cameron McWhirter chronicles the mayhem, while also exploring the first stirrings of a civil rights movement that would transform American society forty years later.
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Author: Tomi Adeyemi

Publisher: Henry Holt and Company (BYR)

ISBN: 1250170982

Category: Young Adult Fiction

Page: 448

View: 7417

With five starred reviews, Tomi Adeyemi’s West African-inspired fantasy debut, and instant #1 New York Times Bestseller, conjures a world of magic and danger, perfect for fans of Leigh Bardugo and Sabaa Tahir. They killed my mother. They took our magic. They tried to bury us. Now we rise. Zélie Adebola remembers when the soil of Orïsha hummed with magic. Burners ignited flames, Tiders beckoned waves, and Zélie’s Reaper mother summoned forth souls. But everything changed the night magic disappeared. Under the orders of a ruthless king, maji were killed, leaving Zélie without a mother and her people without hope. Now Zélie has one chance to bring back magic and strike against the monarchy. With the help of a rogue princess, Zélie must outwit and outrun the crown prince, who is hell-bent on eradicating magic for good. Danger lurks in Orïsha, where snow leoponaires prowl and vengeful spirits wait in the waters. Yet the greatest danger may be Zélie herself as she struggles to control her powers and her growing feelings for an enemy. "A phenomenon." —Entertainment Weekly “The epic I’ve been waiting for.” —New York Times-bestselling author Marie Lu “You will be changed. You will be ready to rise up and reclaim your own magic!” —New York Times-bestselling author Dhonielle Clayton “The next big thing in literature and film.” —Ebony “One of the biggest young adult fiction debut book deals of theyear.” —Teen Vogue This title has Common Core connections. #1 New York Times bestseller, March 14, 2018
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Quanah Parker and the Rise and Fall of the Comanches, the Most Powerful Indian Tribe in American History

Author: S. C. Gwynne

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1416597158

Category: History

Page: 384

View: 7536

In the tradition of Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee, a stunningly vivid historical account of the forty-year battle between Comanche Indians and white settlers for control of the American West, centering on Quanah, the greatest Comanche chief of them all. S.C. Gwynne’s Empire of the Summer Moon spans two astonishing stories. The first traces the rise and fall of the Comanches, the most powerful Indian tribe in American history. The second entails one of the most remarkable narratives ever to come out of the Old West: the epic saga of the pioneer woman Cynthia Ann Parker and her mixed-blood son Quanah, who became the last and greatest chief of the Comanches. Although readers may be more familiar with the tribal names Apache and Sioux, it was in fact the legendary fighting ability of the Comanches that determined just how and when the American West opened up. Comanche boys became adept bareback riders by age six; full Comanche braves were considered the best horsemen who ever rode. They were so masterful at war and so skillful with their arrows and lances that they stopped the northern drive of colonial Spain from Mexico and halted the French expansion westward from Louisiana. White settlers arriving in Texas from the eastern United States were surprised to find the frontier being rolled backward by Comanches incensed by the invasion of their tribal lands. So effective were the Comanches that they forced the creation of the Texas Rangers and account for the advent of the new weapon specifically designed to fight them: the six-gun. The war with the Comanches lasted four decades, in effect holding up the development of the new American nation. Gwynne’s exhilarating account delivers a sweeping narrative that encompasses Spanish colonialism, the Civil War, the destruction of the buffalo herds, and the arrival of the railroads—a historical feast for anyone interested in how the United States came into being. Against this backdrop Gwynne presents the compelling drama of Cynthia Ann Parker, a lovely nine-year-old girl with cornflower-blue eyes who was kidnapped by Comanches from the far Texas frontier in 1836. She grew to love her captors and became infamous as the "White Squaw" who refused to return until her tragic capture by Texas Rangers in 1860. More famous still was her son Quanah, a warrior who was never defeated and whose guerrilla wars in the Texas Panhandle made him a legend. S. C. Gwynne’s account of these events is meticulously researched, intellectually provocative, and, above all, thrillingly told. Empire of the Summer Moon announces him as a major new writer of American history.
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The Attica Prison Uprising of 1971 and Its Legacy

Author: Heather Ann Thompson

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 1400078245

Category: History

Page: 752

View: 9797

Originally published in hardcover in 2016 by Pantheon Books.
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A Novel

Author: Ellen Ullman

Publisher: Macmillan

ISBN: 0374117551

Category: Fiction

Page: 378

View: 5092

Taking a downtown office to plot his comeback in tumultuous 1970s San Francisco, a disgraced professor eavesdrops on a woman's therapy sessions and becomes enraptured by her struggles with identity and ongoing search for her war-torn Jewish-German birth family. By the award-winning author of The Bug. 50,000 first printing.
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The Kings who Made England

Author: Dan Jones

Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers

ISBN: 9780007479733

Category: Great Britain

Page: 352

View: 5714

Eight generations of the greatest and worst kings and queens that this country has ever seen - from the White Ship to the Lionheart, bad King John to the Black Prince and John of Gaunt - this is the dynasty that invented England as we still know it today - history to appeal to readers of Ken Follet, Bernard Cornwell, and Tom Holland.
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Author: Hampton Sides

Publisher: Anchor

ISBN: 9780307387677

Category: History

Page: 624

View: 7156

In the summer of 1846, the Army of the West marched through Santa Fe, en route to invade and occupy the Western territories claimed by Mexico. Fueled by the new ideology of “Manifest Destiny,” this land grab would lead to a decades-long battle between the United States and the Navajos, the fiercely resistant rulers of a huge swath of mountainous desert wilderness.In Blood and Thunder, Hampton Sides gives us a magnificent history of the American conquest of the West. At the center of this sweeping tale is Kit Carson, the trapper, scout, and soldier whose adventures made him a legend. Sides shows us how this illiterate mountain man understood and respected the Western tribes better than any other American, yet willingly followed orders that would ultimately devastate the Navajo nation. Rich in detail and spanning more than three decades, this is an essential addition to our understanding of how the West was really won. From the Trade Paperback edition.
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The Triangle Fire and Its Legacy

Author: Albert Marrin

Publisher: Yearling Books

ISBN: 0553499351

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 192

View: 6947

Describes the conditions in the textile industry in the early 20th century behind the fire at the Triangle Shirtwaist Company that led to the death of many young women, and explains its impact on the labor movement and on society.
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Author: Mike Blakely

Publisher: Forge Books

ISBN: 0765387344

Category: Fiction

Page: 480

View: 6339

Two memorable novels from Spur Award-winning author Mike Blakely at one low price Summer of Pearls The coming of the railroad nearly spelled the end of the riverboat community of Port Caddo until the Great Caddo Lake Pearl Rush of 1874. Ben Crowell remembers it well: that summer, he fell in love. That autumn, Judd Kelso, a local riverboat owner, was killed. The pearl rush was over within a few months, but Judd Kelso's murder remained unsolved, and only Ben Crowell seemed interested in finding out who killed Kelso and why. Spanish Blood In 1870, Bart Young heads for the New Mexico Territory, where he has heard men are making fortunes overnight in land speculation on the old Spanish grants. He expects to be rich before the year is out. But the ranchers are stubborn, the local officials are corrupt, and Bart isn't the first hopeful to arrive. His dream seems a lost cause . . . until he stumbles onto evidence of a lost grant bigger than he could have ever imagined: the entire Sacramento Mountain Range. At the Publisher's request, this title is being sold without Digital Rights Management Software (DRM) applied.
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A True Story

Author: Timothy B. Tyson

Publisher: Broadway Books

ISBN: 9780307419934

Category: History

Page: 368

View: 2434

"Daddy and Roger and 'em shot 'em a nigger." Those words, whispered to ten-year-old Tim Tyson by one of his playmates in the late spring of 1970, heralded a firestorm that would forever transform the small tobacco market town of Oxford, North Carolina. On May 11, 1970, Henry Marrow, a 23-year-old black veteran, walked into a crossroads store owned by Robert Teel, a rough man with a criminal record and ties to the Ku Klux Klan, and came out running. Teel and two of his sons chased Marrow, beat him unmercifully, and killed him in public as he pleaded for his life. In the words of a local prosecutor: "They shot him like you or I would kill a snake." Like many small Southern towns, Oxford had barely been touched by the civil rights movement. But in the wake of the killing, young African Americans took to the streets, led by 22-year-old Ben Chavis, a future president of the NAACP. As mass protests crowded the town square, a cluster of returning Vietnam veterans organized what one termed "a military operation." While lawyers battled in the courthouse that summer in a drama that one termed "a Perry Mason kind of thing," the Ku Klux Klan raged in the shadows and black veterans torched the town's tobacco warehouses. With large sections of the town in flames, Tyson's father, the pastor of Oxford's all-white Methodist church, pressed his congregation to widen their vision of humanity and pushed the town to come to terms with its bloody racial history. In the end, however, the Tyson family was forced to move away. Years later, historian Tim Tyson returned to Oxford to ask Robert Teel why he and his sons had killed Henry Marrow. "That nigger committed suicide, coming in here wanting to four-letter-word my daughter-in-law," Teel explained. The black radicals who burned much of Oxford also told Tim their stories. "It was like we had a cash register up there at the pool hall, just ringing up how much money we done cost these white people," one of them explained. "We knew if we cost 'em enough goddamn money they was gonna start changing some things." In the tradition of To Kill a Mockingbird, Blood Done Sign My Name is a classic work of conscience, a defining portrait of a time and place that we will never forget. Tim Tyson's riveting narrative of that fiery summer and one family's struggle to build bridges in a time of destruction brings gritty blues truth, soaring gospel vision, and down-home humor to our complex history, where violence and faith, courage and evil, despair and hope all mingle to illuminate America's enduring chasm of race. From the Hardcover edition.
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Author: Truman Capote

Publisher: Random House Digital, Inc.

ISBN: 0812994388

Category: True Crime

Page: 396

View: 9574

Powerful account of the brutal slaying of a Kansas family by two young ex-convicts.
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the mob, the monarchy, and the French Revolution

Author: Olivier Bernier

Publisher: Anchor

ISBN: 9780385413336

Category: History

Page: 452

View: 8063

Recounts monumental events of the French Revolution from Bastille Day until the Terror, and profiles the monarchy, leaders of the Revolution, and the masses who rallied to demand change
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Author: Sabrina Flynn

Publisher: Sabrina Flynn

ISBN: N.A

Category: Murder

Page: 475

View: 1759

An honorable man with a bloody past he can only remember in part, and a woman dead in the eyes of the world, but all too alive. A confessed murderer, and a missing body lures Isobel Kingston into the night, but she finds far more than she bargains for on the foggy dunes. Ambushed and rendered unconscious, she wakes to find herself at the mercy of brutal men. Desperate, she plays her last card: she threatens her captors with the wrath of Atticus Riot. To her surprise, Riot's very name strikes terror into the men, and Isobel begins to wonder what she really knows about the enigmatic man. As Atticus Riot searches for Isobel, regret hounds his every step, and the voice of his dead partner, Zephaniah Ravenwood, pulls him into the past, making him look at events long buried and uncover truths that he's tried hard to forget. When Isobel's trail leads to an old enemy, he's forced to confront his nightmares, and the aching truth that he isn't the man he thought he was.
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Religion and the History of Violence

Author: Karen Armstrong

Publisher: Anchor

ISBN: 0385353103

Category: History

Page: 528

View: 1858

From the renowned and best-selling author of A History of God, a sweeping exploration of religion and the history of human violence. For the first time, religious self-identification is on the decline in American. Some analysts have cited as cause a post-9/11perception: that faith in general is a source of aggression, intolerance, and divisiveness—something bad for society. But how accurate is that view? With deep learning and sympathetic understanding, Karen Armstrong sets out to discover the truth about religion and violence in each of the world’s great traditions, taking us on an astonishing journey from prehistoric times to the present. While many historians have looked at violence in connection with particular religious manifestations (jihad in Islam or Christianity’s Crusades), Armstrong looks at each faith—not only Christianity and Islam, but also Buddhism, Hinduism, Confucianism, Daoism, and Judaism—in its totality over time. As she describes, each arose in an agrarian society with plenty powerful landowners brutalizing peasants while also warring among themselves over land, then the only real source of wealth. In this world, religion was not the discrete and personal matter it would become for us but rather something that permeated all aspects of society. And so it was that agrarian aggression, and the warrior ethos it begot, became bound up with observances of the sacred. In each tradition, however, a counterbalance to the warrior code also developed. Around sages, prophets, and mystics there grew up communities protesting the injustice and bloodshed endemic to agrarian society, the violence to which religion had become heir. And so by the time the great confessional faiths came of age, all understood themselves as ultimately devoted to peace, equality, and reconciliation, whatever the acts of violence perpetrated in their name. Industrialization and modernity have ushered in an epoch of spectacular and unexampled violence, although, as Armstrong explains, relatively little of it can be ascribed directly to religion. Nevertheless, she shows us how and in what measure religions, in their relative maturity, came to absorb modern belligerence—and what hope there might be for peace among believers of different creeds in our time. At a moment of rising geopolitical chaos, the imperative of mutual understanding between nations and faith communities has never been more urgent, the dangers of action based on misunderstanding never greater. Informed by Armstrong’s sweeping erudition and personal commitment to the promotion of compassion, Fields of Blood makes vividly clear that religion is not the problem.
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Author: Dan Simmons

Publisher: Grand Central Publishing

ISBN: 9780446362665

Category: Fiction

Page: 608

View: 7751

In the summer of 1960 in Elm Haven, Illinois, five 12-year-old boys forge the powerful bonds that a lifetime of change will not break. An ancient, sinister evil lurks in the dark, and when a long-silent bell peals in the middle of the deepest night, the people know it marks the beginning of terror. Now Mike, Duane, Dale, Harlen, and Kevin must wage a fraternal war of blood against an arcane abomination.
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Author: Roger Kahn

Publisher: Aurum Press Limited

ISBN: 1781312079

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 560

View: 4407

DIV This is a book about young men who learned to play baseball during the 1930s and 1940s, and then went on to play for one of the most exciting major-league ball clubs ever fielded, the team that broke the colour barrier with Jackie Robinson. It is a book by and about a sportswriter who grew up near Ebbets Field, and who had the good fortune in the 1950s to cover the Dodgers for the Herald Tribune. This is a book about what happened to Jackie, Carl Erskine, Pee Wee Reese, and the others when their glory days were behind them. In short, it is a book fathers and sons and about the making of modern America. 'At a point in life when one is through with boyhood, but has not yet discovered how to be a man, it was my fortune to travel with the most marvelously appealing of teams.' Sentimental because it holds such promise, and bittersweet because that promise is past, the first sentence of this masterpiece of sporting literature, first published in the early '70s, sets its tone. The team is the mid-20th-century Brooklyn Dodgers, the team of Robinson and Snyder and Hodges and Reese, a team of great triumph and historical import composed of men whose fragile lives were filled with dignity and pathos. Roger Kahn, who covered that team for the New York Herald Tribune, makes understandable humans of his heroes as he chronicles the dreams and exploits of their young lives, beautifully intertwining them with his own, then recounts how so many of those sweet dreams curdled as the body of these once shining stars grew rusty with age and battered by experience. /div
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