How Four Nineteenth-century Journalists Made the Newspaper Women's Business

Author: Karen Roggenkamp

Publisher: Kent State University Press

ISBN: 9781606352878

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: N.A

View: 4882

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New Journalism and Literary Genre in Late Nineteenth-century American Newspapers and Fiction

Author: Karen Roggenkamp

Publisher: Kent State University Press

ISBN: 9780873388269

Category: History

Page: 199

View: 448

Due to a burgeoning print marketplace during the late nineteenth century, urban newspapers felt pressure to create entertaining prose that appealed to readers, drawing on popular literary genres such as travel adventures, detective tales, and historical romances as a way of framing the news for readers. Using current events for their source documents, reporters fashioned their own dramas based on those that readers recognized from a broadly drawn literary culture. The desire to spin attractive, popular tales sometimes came at the expense of factual information. This novel, commercialized, and sensationalistic style of reporting, called "new journalism," was closely tied to American fiction. In "Narrating the News Karen Roggenkamp examines five major stories featured in three respected New York newspapers during the 1890s--"the story of two antebellum hoaxes, Nellie Bly's around-the-world journey, Lizzie Borden's sensational trial, Evangelina Cisneros's rescue from her Spanish captors, and the Janet Cooke "Jimmy's World" Scandal--"to illustrate how new journalism manipulated specific segments of the literary marketplace. These case studies are complemented by broader cultural analyses that touch on vital topics in literary and cultural studies--"gender, expansionism, realism, and professionalization. Unlike previously published studies of literature and journalism, which focus only on a few canonical figures, Roggenkamp looks at part of the history of mass print communications more generally, exposing the competitive and reinforcing interplay between specific literary genres and their journalistic revisions. "Narrating the News provides an original, significant contribution to the fieldsof literature, journalism history, and cultural studies.
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Living by the Press

Author: Marianne Van Remoortel

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 1137435992

Category: Social Science

Page: 189

View: 8878

Covering a wide range of magazine work, including editing, illustration, poetry, needlework instruction and typesetting, this book provides fresh insights into the participation of women in the nineteenth-century magazine industry.
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Author: Janet Malcolm

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 0307797872

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 176

View: 4352

A seminal work and examination of the psychopathology of journalism. Using a strange and unprecedented lawsuit as her larger-than-life example -- the lawsuit of Jeffrey MacDonald, a convicted murderer, against Joe McGinniss, the author of Fatal Vision, a book about the crime -- she delves into the always uneasy, sometimes tragic relationship that exists between journalist and subject. In Malcolm's view, neither journalist nor subject can avoid the moral impasse that is built into the journalistic situation. When the text first appeared, as a two-part article in The New Yorker, its thesis seemed so radical and its irony so pitiless that journalists across the country reacted as if stung. Her book is a work of journalism as well as an essay on journalism: it at once exemplifies and dissects its subject. In her interviews with the leading and subsidiary characters in the MacDonald-McGinniss case -- the principals, their lawyers, the members of the jury, and the various persons who testified as expert witnesses at the trial -- Malcolm is always aware of herself as a player in a game that, as she points out, she cannot lose. The journalist-subject encounter has always troubled journalists, but never before has it been looked at so unflinchingly and so ruefully. Hovering over the narrative -- and always on the edge of the reader's consciousness -- is the MacDonald murder case itself, which imparts to the book an atmosphere of anxiety and uncanniness. The Journalist and the Murderer derives from and reflects many of the dominant intellectual concerns of our time, and it will have a particular appeal for those who cherish the odd, the off-center, and the unsolved.
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A Nineteenth-century Dress Reform in the United States

Author: Gayle V. Fischer

Publisher: Kent State University Press

ISBN: 9780873386821

Category: History

Page: 262

View: 3694

"In Pantaloons and Power Gayle V. Fischer depicts how the reformers' denouncement of conventional dress highlighted the role of clothing in the struggle of power relations between the sexes. Wearing pantaloons was considered a subversive act and was often met with social ostracism. Fischer contends that while it was not the goal of many reformers to alter gender relations, as women adopted pantaloons the perception of male and female power relationships blurred, and the boundaries of social roles for women began to shift." "This carefully researched interdisciplinary study successfully combines the fields of costume history, women's history, material culture, and social history to tell the story of one highly charged dress reform and its resonance in nineteenth-century society."--BOOK JACKET.
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Love and Madness in the Eighteenth Century

Author: John Brewer

Publisher: Macmillan

ISBN: 0374529779

Category: History

Page: 352

View: 9179

Probing a 1779 incident involving the murder of a prominent woman by a clergyman, the author unfolds fact from fiction, comparing confusing, conflicting accounts of the crime to reveal how dubious facts end up becoming part of "history." Reprint.
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Author: Nellie Bly

Publisher: Andrews UK Limited

ISBN: 1849895317

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 86

View: 8725

This is the true story of reporter Nellie Bly, who pretends to be insane, and manages to get herself committed into an insane asylum in the USA. This revised second digital edition is a fascinating account, specially formatted for today's e-readers by Andrews UK.
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From Morse to McLuhan

Author: Daniel J. Czitrom

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

ISBN: 0807899208

Category: Social Science

Page: 268

View: 4000

In a fascinating and comprehensive intellectual history of modern communication in America, Daniel Czitrom examines the continuing contradictions between the progressive possibilities that new communications technologies offer and their use as instruments of domination and exploitation.
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The Gilded Age Crime That Scandalized a City and Sparked the Tabloid Wars

Author: Paul Collins

Publisher: Broadway Books

ISBN: 0307592219

Category: True Crime

Page: 325

View: 9226

On Long Island, a farmer finds a duck pond turned red with blood. On the Lower East Side, two boys playing at a pier discover a floating human torso wrapped tightly in oilcloth. Blueberry pickers near Harlem stumble upon neatly severed limbs in an overgrown ditch. Clues to a horrifying crime are turning up all over New York, but the police are baffled: There are no witnesses, no motives, no suspects. The grisly finds that began on the afternoon of June 26, 1897, plunged detectives headlong into the era'smost baffling murder mystery. Seized upon by battling media moguls Joseph Pulitzer and William Randolph Hearst, the case became a publicity circus. Reenactments of the murder were staged in Times Square, armed reporters lurked in the streets of Hell's Kitchen in pursuit of suspects, and an unlikely trio, a hard luck cop, a cub reporter, and an eccentric professor, all raced to solve the crime. What emerged was a sensational love triangle and an even more sensational trial: an unprecedented capital case hinging on circumstantial evidence around a victim whom the police couldn't identify with certainty, and who the defense claimed wasn't even dead. This book is a tale of America during the Gilded Age and a colorful re creation of the tabloid wars that havedominated media to this day.
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What the British Did to India

Author: Shashi Tharoor

Publisher: Penguin Classics

ISBN: 9780141987149

Category: Great Britain

Page: 288

View: 8344

The Sunday Times Top 10 bestseller on India's experience of British colonialism, by the internationally-acclaimed author and diplomat Shashi Tharoor 'Tharoor's impassioned polemic slices straight to the heart of the darkness that drives all empires ... laying bare the grim, and high, cost of the British Empire for its former subjects. An essential read' Financial Times In the eighteenth century, India's share of the world economy was as large as Europe's. By 1947, after two centuries of British rule, it had decreased six-fold. The Empire blew rebels from cannon, massacred unarmed protesters, entrenched institutionalised racism, and caused millions to die from starvation. British imperialism justified itself as enlightened despotism for the benefit of the governed, but Shashi Tharoor takes demolishes this position, demonstrating how every supposed imperial 'gift' - from the railways to the rule of law - was designed in Britain's interests alone. He goes on to show how Britain's Industrial Revolution was founded on India's deindustrialisation, and the destruction of its textile industry. In this bold and incisive reassessment of colonialism, Tharoor exposes to devastating effect the inglorious reality of Britain's stained Indian legacy.
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Why Good People are Divided by Politics and Religion

Author: Jonathan Haidt

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 0307455777

Category: Philosophy

Page: 500

View: 2592

Presents a groundbreaking investigation into the origins of morality at the core of religion and politics, offering scholarly insight into the motivations behind cultural clashes that are polarizing America.
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Thinking About Electric Communication in the Late Nineteenth Century

Author: Carolyn Marvin

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780198021384

Category: Social Science

Page: 296

View: 3822

In the history of electronic communication, the last quarter of the nineteenth century holds a special place, for it was during this period that the telephone, phonograph, electric light, wireless, and cinema were all invented. In When old Technologies Were New, Carolyn Marvin explores how two of these new inventions--the telephone and the electric light--were publicly envisioned at the end of the nineteenth century, as seen in specialized engineering journals and popular media. Marvin pays particular attention to the telephone, describing how it disrupted established social relations, unsettling customary ways of dividing the private person and family from the more public setting of the community. On the lighter side, she describes how people spoke louder when calling long distance, and how they worried about catching contagious diseases over the phone. A particularly powerful chapter deals with telephonic precursors of radio broadcasting--the "Telephone Herald" in New York and the "Telefon Hirmondo" of Hungary--and the conflict between the technological development of broadcasting and the attempt to impose a homogenous, ethnocentric variant of Anglo-Saxon culture on the public. While focusing on the way professionals in the electronics field tried to control the new media, Marvin also illuminates the broader social impact, presenting a wide-ranging, informative, and entertaining account of the early years of electronic media.
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A Critical Analysis for Lawyers and Laymen

Author: Felix Frankfurter

Publisher: William S. Hein & Co., Inc.

ISBN: 9781575888057

Category: Law

Page: 118

View: 3883

Frankfurter's aim in this work is to give a brief, yet accurate, account of the facts surrounding the case from the earliest stages to its present state as of the date of publication in 1927. His account is based on the court proceedings, along with references to extrinsic facts as were necessary for understanding what transpired in court. Appendix A includes a tabular study by Counsel of Sacco and Vanzetti which compares important hypotheses between Morelli-Madeiros and Sacco-Vanzetti. Appendix B includes an editorial that was published in the Boston Herald on Oct. 26, 1926.
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Final Report of the National Commission on Terrorist Attacks Upon the United States

Author: N.A

Publisher: Government Printing Office

ISBN: 0160891809

Category: Political Science

Page: 587

View: 3788

This edition has been designated as the only official U.S. Government edition of the 9-11 Commission’s Final Report. It provides a full and complete account of the circumstances surrounding the September 11th, 2001 terrorist attacks, including preparedness for and the immediate response to the attacks. It also includes recommendations designed to guard against future attacks.
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Why We Fall for It . . . Every Time

Author: Maria Konnikova

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 0698170997

Category: Psychology

Page: 288

View: 9390

"It’s a startling and disconcerting read that should make you think twice every time a friend of a friend offers you the opportunity of a lifetime.” —Erik Larson, #1 New York Times bestselling author of Dead Wake and bestselling author of Devil in the White City Think you can’t get conned? Think again. The New York Times bestselling author of Mastermind: How to Think Like Sherlock Holmes explains how to spot the con before they spot you. “[An] excellent study of Con Artists, stories & the human need to believe” –Neil Gaiman, via Twitter A compelling investigation into the minds, motives, and methods of con artists—and the people who fall for their cons over and over again. While cheats and swindlers may be a dime a dozen, true conmen—the Bernie Madoffs, the Jim Bakkers, the Lance Armstrongs—are elegant, outsized personalities, artists of persuasion and exploiters of trust. How do they do it? Why are they successful? And what keeps us falling for it, over and over again? These are the questions that journalist and psychologist Maria Konnikova tackles in her mesmerizing new book. From multimillion-dollar Ponzi schemes to small-time frauds, Konnikova pulls together a selection of fascinating stories to demonstrate what all cons share in common, drawing on scientific, dramatic, and psychological perspectives. Insightful and gripping, the book brings readers into the world of the con, examining the relationship between artist and victim. The Confidence Game asks not only why we believe con artists, but also examines the very act of believing and how our sense of truth can be manipulated by those around us. From the Hardcover edition.
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Murder and Money in the Gilded Age

Author: Wendy Gamber

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN: 1421420201

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 374

In September 1868, the remains of Jacob and Nancy Jane Young were found lying near the banks of Indiana’s White River. It was a gruesome scene. Part of Jacob’s face had been blown off, apparently by the shotgun that lay a few feet away. Spiders and black beetles crawled over his wound. Smoke rose from his wife’s smoldering body, which was so badly burned that her intestines were exposed, the flesh on her thighs gone, and the bones partially reduced to powder. Suspicion for both deaths turned to Nancy Clem, a housewife who was also one of Mr. Young’s former business partners. In The Notorious Mrs. Clem, Wendy Gamber chronicles the life and times of this charming and persuasive Gilded Age confidence woman, who became famous not only as an accused murderess but also as an itinerant peddler of patent medicine and the supposed originator of the Ponzi scheme. Clem’s story is a shocking tale of friendship and betrayal, crime and punishment, courtroom drama and partisan politicking, get-rich-quick schemes and shady business deals. It also raises fascinating questions about women’s place in an evolving urban economy. As they argued over Clem’s guilt or innocence, lawyers, jurors, and ordinary citizens pondered competing ideas about gender, money, and marriage. Was Clem on trial because she allegedly murdered her business partner? Or was she on trial because she engaged in business? Along the way, Gamber introduces a host of equally compelling characters, from prosecuting attorney and future U.S. president Benjamin Harrison to folksy defense lawyer John Hanna, daring detective Peter Wilkins, pioneering "lady news writer" Laura Ream, and female-remedy manufacturer Michael Slavin. Based on extensive sources, including newspapers, trial documents, and local histories, this gripping account of a seemingly typical woman who achieved extraordinary notoriety will appeal to true crime lovers and historians alike.
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Reporting from the Heart of the War

Author: Francesca Borri

Publisher: Seven Stories Press

ISBN: 160980662X

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 224

View: 8677

August 21, 2013: a chemical weapons attack on the suburbs of Damascus reminds the world of the existence of the Syrian war. Hundreds of journalists from every corner of the world rush to the frontier only to leave disappointed when Obama decides not to bomb. They leave behind 200,000 estimated victims, and more than half of a population of 22 million people dispersed or refugeed in nearby countries: the worst humanitarian crisis since WWII according to the UN. Francesca Borri is one of them. But she does not leave. She is thirty years old. For months she covers the battle of Aleppo as a freelance reporter. And she quickly realizes that to report a war is to hide with dozens of women and children, even a baby, born there, in a grave, 'a piece of soil under the ground that is as expensive as three houses' or to scavenge for anything to burn for some warmth, 'a broken slipper, the plastic hand of a toy' or to mistake bloody figments of skull for rubble. To report a war is also to meet with officials more worried about the stain of snow on their Clarks than the people they are supposed to help. It is to explain what is happening in Aleppo to journalists who have only been there once, on vacation, and bought a carpet. It is risking one's life because of the jealousy of a fellow reporter. And it is also about dreaming of driving at night with the windows open, about remembering impossible little things, the particular light on that day in that café at the beach when you were a kid, the eyes of people you love, all the minuscule simple joys that can be lost in a moment. Syrian Dust is a raw and powerful account of the Syrian war that throws the reader right in the middle of it, without any shelter. From the Trade Paperback edition.
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A True Story of Southern Family Pride, Madness, and Multiple Murder

Author: Jerry Bledsoe

Publisher: Diversion Books

ISBN: 1626812861

Category: True Crime

Page: 423

View: 4755

The terrifying #1 New York Times bestseller about the unbreakable ties of blood The first bodies found were those of a feisty millionaire widow and her daughter in their posh Louisville, Kentucky, home. Months later, another wealthy widow and her prominent son and daughter-in-law were found savagely slain in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. Mystified police first suspected a professional in the bizarre gangland-style killings that shattered the quiet tranquility of two well-to-do southern communities. But soon a suspicion grew that turned their focus to family. The Sharps. The Newsoms. The Lynches. The only link between the three families was a beautiful and aristocratic young mother named Susie Sharp Newsom Lynch. Could this former child “princess” and fraternity sweetheart have committed such barbarous crimes? And what about her gun-loving first cousin and lover, Fritz Klenner, son of a nationally renowned doctor? In this powerful and riveting tale of three families connected by marriage and murder … of obsessive love and bitter custody battles, Jerry Bledsoe recounts the shocking events that ultimately took nine lives, building to a truly horrifying climax that will leave you stunned. “Recreates one of the most shocking crimes of recent years!”—Publishers Weekly “Riveting…chilling…engrossing!”—Kirkus Reviews “Absorbing suspense…Bledsoe leaves no pebble unturned in his reporting.”—Chicago Tribune “An astonishing, shocking and riveting account, brilliantly chronicled.”—Detroit News-Free Press “An engrossing southern gothic sure to delight fans of the true-crime genre. Bledsoe maintains the suspense with a sure hand.”—Charlotte Observer
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Fame, Lust, and the Beautiful Killers Who Inspired Chicago

Author: Douglas Perry

Publisher: Penguin Books

ISBN: 0143119222

Category: History

Page: 304

View: 9666

Documents the true stories of Belva Gaertner and Beulah Annan, the women whose sensational murder trials inspired the musical "Chicago," and traces the contributions of fledgling reporter Maurine Watkins against a backdrop of Chicago's Jazz Age culture.
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A Mystery

Author: Brad Parks

Publisher: Minotaur Books

ISBN: 9781429987127

Category: Fiction

Page: 336

View: 9026

Four bodies, each with a single bullet wound in the back of the head, stacked like cordwood in a weed-choked vacant lot: That's the front-page news facing Carter Ross, investigative reporter with the Newark Eagle-Examiner. Immediately dispatched to the scene, Carter learns that the four victims—an exotic dancer, a drug dealer, a hustler, and a mama's boy—came from different parts of the city and didn't seem to know one another. The police, eager to calm jittery residents, leak a theory that the murders are revenge for a bar stickup, and Carter's paper, hungry for a scoop, hastily prints it. Carter doesn't come from the streets, but he understands a thing or two about Newark's neighborhoods. And he knows there are no quick answers when dealing with a crime like this. Determined to uncover the true story, he enlists the aide of Tina Thompson, the paper's smoking-hot city editor, to run interference at the office; Tommy Hernandez, the paper's gay Cuban intern, to help him with legwork on the streets; and Tynesha Dales, a local stripper, to take him to Newark's underside. It turns out that the four victims have one connection after all, and this knowledge will put Carter on the path of one very ambitious killer. Faces of the Gone by Brad Parks won the Shamus Award for Best First Novel and the Nero Award for Best American Mystery--it is the first book to receive both awards. The book was named to lists of the year's best mystery debuts by the Chicago Sun-Times and South Florida Sun-Sentinel.
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