From Augustus to Justinian

Author: W. W. Buckland,Peter Stein

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521043689

Category: History

Page: 796

View: 4964

A revised edition of Peter Buckland's classic textbook on Roman Law.
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Author: Joseph Anthony Charles Thomas

Publisher: North-Holland

ISBN: 9780720405132

Category: Law

Page: 562

View: 5403

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Author: Paul du Plessis

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 0198736223

Category: Law

Page: 440

View: 8141

Borkowski's Textbook on Roman Law is the leading textbook in the field of Roman law, and has been written with undergraduate students firmly in mind. The book provides an accessible and highly engaging account of Roman private law and civil procedure, with coverage of all key topics, including the Roman legal system, and the law of persons, property, and obligations. The author sets the law in its social and historical context, and demonstrates the impact of Roman law on our modern legal systems. For the fifth edition, Paul du Plessis has included references to a wide range of scholarly texts, to ground his judicious account of Roman law firmly in contemporary scholarship. He has also added examples from legal practice, as well as truncated timelines at the start of each chapter to illustrate how the law developed over time. The book contains a wealth of learning features, including chapter summaries, diagrams and maps. A major feature of the book is the inclusion throughout of extracts in translation from the most important sources of Roman law: the Digest and the Institutes of Justinian. Annotated further reading sections at the end of each chapter act as a guide to further enquiry. Online Resource Centre The book is accompanied by an extensive Online Resource Centre, containing the following resources: -Self-test multiple choice questions -Interactive timeline -Biographies of key figures -Glossary of Latin terms -Annotated web links -Original Latin versions of the extracts from the Digest and the Institutes of Justinian -Examples of textual analysis of Roman law texts -Guide to the literature and sources of Roman law
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Author: Paul du Plessis

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 019957488X

Category: Law

Page: 427

View: 8027

Rev. ed. of: Textbook on Roman law / Andrew Borkowski, Paul du Plessis. 3rd ed. c2005.
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Author: Fernand Bernard

Publisher: The Lawbook Exchange, Ltd.

ISBN: 1616190221

Category: History

Page: 344

View: 2000

Bernard, Fernand.The First Year of Roman Law. Translated by Charles P. Sherman. New York: Oxford University Press, 1906. xiii, 326 pp. Reprinted 2010 by The Lawbook Exchange, Ltd. ISBN-13: 9781616190224. ISBN-10: 1616190221. Paperback. New. $21.95.* This is a useful introduction to Roman law with a level of detail that falls midway between an outline and a textbook. Carefully organized, it is also an excellent reference guide. "To begin with, it is quite comprehensive, for there is not a single principle of Roman law, sufficiently important to be included in first-year study, which the author has omitted.... [L]egal principles and definitions are very concisely stated, and a lecturer on the subject will be glad to find an important rule given in such brief, almost epigrammatic form, that it can be readily committed to memory. (...) Another good feature is the practice of frequently citing the original Latin phrases and sentences.... Lastly, the translator has provided a good index, which is a valuable addition to the original work. We are sure that many teachers of Roman law will welcome this book as a manual to be placed in the hands of their students.": Columbia Law Review 7 (1907) 377-378.
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Author: J. Andrew Borkowski,Paul J. du Plessis

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: N.A

Category: Law

Page: 417

View: 3753

Within the space of a thousand years, Roman society transformed itself from an insignificant tribe on the Italian mainland struggling for territorial supremacy, to one of the most accomplished civilisations of the ancient world, whose Empire extended over the greater part of Western Europe, the Mediterranean and northern Africa. This transformation was not a chance event. It was a direct result of the Roman genius for government and the law. Through a relentless campaign of "empire building", Roman armies conquered and subjugated vast territories. Unlike other conquerors of the ancient world, however, the Romans were keenly aware that their dominance of these regions could only be maintained through a process of "Romanization" that included the installation of an effective bureaucracy utilising a flexible system of law. Although the Roman Empire was destined to disintegrate over time, its legal system left an indelible imprint on Western Europe. Roman law, as rediscovered by theItalian Glossators in the eleventh century, provided the conceptual foundation of many modern legal systems, and continues to provide an invaluable introduction to paradigms of legal thought and the study of legal concepts. Above all, Roman law is richly rewarding to study for its own sake, as a remarkable feat of organized good sense and structured orderliness. The book provides students with a lucid and readable exposition of Roman civil law and procedure. To make the subject more accessible, the author sets the law in the context of the history of Rome and keeps the use of Latin phrases to a minimum. A major feature of the book is the use of texts (in translation) from the most important sources of Roman law. The texts serve to illustrate the law and to make it more vivid for the reader. This third edition has been fully updated to reflect recent developments in Romanist scholarship. References to key articles and books have been incorporated into the text and further reading sections included at the end of each chapter. The final chapter on Roman law and the European ius commune has been substantially expanded. Online Resource Centre DT Glossary of Latin terms appearing in the text. DT Annotated web links to search engines and websites devoted to Roman law. DT Comprehensive time line incorporating Roman legal and social history. DT Short biographies of key figures in Roman legal history. DT Original Latin versions of citations reproduced in the book DT Multiple choice questions covering each chapter.
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a textbook of the history and system of Roman private law

Author: Rudolf Sohm,Bernhard Erwin GrĂ¼ber

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 606

View: 2336

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An Historical Introduction

Author: Hans Julius Wolff

Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press

ISBN: 9780806112961

Category: Political Science

Page: 260

View: 7823

One of the great and lasting influences on the course of Western culture, Roman law occupies a unique place in the history of the civilized world. Originally the law of a small rural community, then of a powerful city-state, it became the law of an empire which embraced almost all of the known civilized world. The influence of Roman law extends into modern times and is reflected in the great codifications of private law that have come into existence in Europe, America, and Asia. Even now, Roman law in modified form is the law of the land in Scotland, and the civil code of Louisiana is directly based on Roman law. Forming an important part in the historical and intellectual background of understanding and a basis for further development of the principles of international jurisprudence. In this book an international authority on Roman legal history sets forth in clear, understandable English the institutions of Roman law and traces their development through the Byzantine Empire into medieval and modern Europe. It is an indispensable study for every American lawyer and for anyone interesting in legal and political history.
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Author: Andrew Borkowski

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781854316424

Category: Law

Page: 420

View: 5579

Roman law constitutes one of the most important and enduring legacies from the ancient world to the modern. It has helped to shape many of the legal systems of today, and continues to provide an invaluable introduction to the study of legal concepts. The book provides students with an exposition of Roman civil law and procedure, setting the law in the context of the history of Rome and keeping the use of Latin phrases to a minimum. A major feature of the book is the use of texts from the ultimate source of Roman law, the "Digest of Justinian". The texts serve to illustrate the law and to make it more vivid for the reader. Emphasis is placed on the influence of Roman law on the modern world and more extensive reference to the fruits of Roman law scholarship.
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Author: Alan Watson

Publisher: University of Georgia Press

ISBN: 0820330612

Category: Law

Page: 241

View: 5002

This book is not about the rules or concepts of Roman law, says Alan Watson, but about the values and approaches, explicit and implicit, of those who made the law. The scope of Watson's concerns encompasses the period from the Twelve Tables, around 451 B.C., to the end of the so-called classical period, around A.D. 235. As he discusses the issues and problems that faced the Roman legal intelligentsia, Watson also holds up Roman law as a clear, although admittedly extreme, example of law's enormous impact on society in light of society's limited input into law. Roman private law has been the most admired and imitated system of private law in the world, but it evolved, Watson argues, as a hobby of gentlemen, albeit a hobby that carried social status. The jurists, the private individuals most responsible for legal development, were first and foremost politicians and (in the Empire) bureaucrats; their engagement with the law was primarily to win the esteem of their peers. The exclusively patrician College of Pontiffs was given a monopoly on interpretation of private law in the mid fifth century B.C. Though the College would lose its exclusivity and monopoly, interpretation of law remained one mark of a Roman gentleman. But only interpretation of the law, not conceptualization or systematization or reform, gave prestige, says Watson. Further, the jurists limited themselves to particular modes of reasoning: no arguments to a ruling could be based on morality, justice, economic welfare, or what was approved elsewhere. No praetor (one of the elected officials who controlled the courts) is famous for introducing reforms, Watson points out, and, in contrast with a nonjurist like Cicero, no jurist theorized about the nature of law. A strong characteristic of Roman law is its relative autonomy, and isolation from the rest of life. Paradoxically, this very autonomy was a key factor in the Reception of Roman Law--the assimilation of the learned Roman law as taught at the universities into the law of the individual territories of Western Europe.
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Author: Thomas Collett Sandars

Publisher: The Lawbook Exchange, Ltd.

ISBN: 1584777265

Category: History

Page: 608

View: 2795

Reprint of the seventh and final edition of one of the finest translations of the Institutes. The work includes Latin and English text with English commentary. Commissioned by the Emperor Justinian in 530 CE, it restated all existing Roman law. Rediscovered during the late middle ages, it has been the central textbook of Roman law ever since.
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Author: Alan Watson

Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

ISBN: 0812205529

Category: History

Page: 768

View: 8837

When Justinian became sole ruler of the Byzantine Empire in A.D. 527, he ordered the preparation of three compilations of Roman law that together formed the Corpus Juris Civilis. These works have become known individually as the Code, which collected the legal pronouncements of the Roman emperors, the Institutes, an elementary student's textbook, and the Digest, by far the largest and most highly prized of the three compilations. The Digest was assembled by a team of sixteen academic lawyers commissioned by Justinian in 533 to cull everything of value from earlier Roman law. It was for centuries the focal point of legal education in the West and remains today an unprecedented collection of the commentaries of Roman jurists on the civil law. Commissioned by the Commonwealth Fund in 1978, Alan Watson assembled a team of thirty specialists to produce this magisterial translation, which was first completed and published in 1985 with Theodor Mommsen's Latin text of 1878 on facing pages. This paperback edition presents a corrected English-language text alone, with an introduction by Alan Watson. Links to the three other volumes in the set: Volume 1 [Books 1-15] Volume 3 [Books 30-40] Volume 4 [Books 41-50]
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Problems and Methods for Ancient Historians

Author: O. F. Robinson

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134877765

Category: History

Page: 168

View: 2588

The notion and understanding of law penetrated society in Ancient Rome to a degree unparalleled in modern times. The poet Juvenal, for instance, described the virtuous man as a good soldier, faithful guardian, incorruptible judge and honest witness. This book is concerned with four central questions: Who made the law? Where did a Roman go to discover what the law was? How has the law survived to be known to us today? And what procedures were there for putting the law into effect? In The Sources of Roman Law, the origins of law and their relative weight are described in the light of developing Roman history. This is a topic that appeals to a wide range of readers: the law student will find illumination for the study of the substantive law; the student of history will be guided into an appreciation of what Roman law means as well as its value for the understanding and interpretation of Roman history. Both will find invaluable the description of how the sources have survived to inform our legal system and pose their problems for us.
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Author: A. D. E. Lewis,D. J. Ibbetson

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521441995

Category: Law

Page: 234

View: 695

The law developed by the ancient Romans remains a powerful legal and political instrument today. In The Roman Law Tradition a general editorial introduction complements a series of more detailed essays by an international team of distinguished legal scholars exploring the various ways in which Roman law has affected and continues to affect patterns of legal decision-making throughout the world.
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Author: Joshua Getzler

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN: 9780198265818

Category: Law

Page: 396

View: 831

This volume describes how the courts created rights for land owners and users competing to appropriate water for factories, town supply, drainage, and transport. It covers the period from early times to the late nineteenth century, illustrating the changing common law of property and tort, and throwing new light on the growth of the economy and the social and legal dimensions of technological innovation.Readership: Academics and post-graduate/advanced students in law and legal history. It will also have a readership in economic and social history and also the history of technology.
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Author: Thomas Lambert Mears

Publisher: The Lawbook Exchange, Ltd.

ISBN: 1584777575

Category: Law

Page: 445

View: 6163

A landmark in the study of Roman law Reprint of the only edition. The final edition of Ortolan's Explication Historique des Instituts de Justinien (1873) is a vast three-volume work containing a history of Roman law, a treatise on Roman jurisprudence and a complete commentary on the Institutes, the textbook of Justinian's law from the Corpus Juris Civilis. It was the standard textbook in its day and often the basis for examinations. Conceived for students with limited time and fluency in French, Mears's Analysis is a skillful condensation of Ortolan's work. Still a remarkably comprehensive study, it provides an excellent contextual overview of Roman law. CONTENTS PART I. History of Roman Legislation First Epoch -The Kings Second Epoch -The Republic Third Epoch -The Emperors Roman Law after Justinian PART II. Generalisation of Roman Law Introduction Persons Things Facts, Events, or Acts Rights PART III. Commentary on Justinian's Institutes Argument and Preface Book I Book II Book III Book IV T[homas]. Lambert Mears [1839-1918] was a barrister of the Inner Temple and taught at the University of London.
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Author: David Morton Gwynn

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9004163832

Category: History

Page: 281

View: 1798

This volume offers a reassessment of the life and scholarship of A.H.M. Jones and of the impact and legacy of his great work "The Later Roman Empire 284a "602: A Social, Economic, and Administrative Survey (1964)."
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