Political Attitudes and Behaviour

Author: John H. Goldthorpe

Publisher: CUP Archive

ISBN: 9780521095266

Category: Political Science

Page: 94

View: 4409

In this 1968 volume the authors report on the voting and the political attitudes of a sample of highly-paid manual workers.
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Author: John H. Goldthorpe,David Lockwood,Frank Bechhofer,Jennifer Platt

Publisher: CUP Archive

ISBN: 9780521095334

Category: Social Science

Page: 248

View: 1464

This final book in The Affluent Worker series contains the findings and conclusions on the extent of working class embourgeoisment.
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Author: Frank Parkin

Publisher: Psychology Press

ISBN: 9780415265010

Category: Social Science

Page: 315

View: 3836

Tavistock Press was established as a co-operative venture between the Tavistock Institute and Routledge & Kegan Paul (RKP) in the 1950s to produce a series of major contributions across the social sciences. This volume is part of a 2001 reissue of a selection of those important works which have since gone out of print, or are difficult to locate. Published by Routledge, 112 volumes in total are being brought together under the name The International Behavioural and Social Sciences Library: Classics from the Tavistock Press. Reproduced here in facsimile, this volume was originally published in 1974 and is available individually. The collection is also available in a number of themed mini-sets of between 5 and 13 volumes, or as a complete collection.
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Reds and America's Industrial Unions

Author: Judith Stepan-Norris,Maurice Zeitlin

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521798402

Category: Political Science

Page: 375

View: 8664

This book analyzes the legacy of the Communists in the CIO between the 1930s and 1950s.
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Automation and Social Integration Within the Capitalist Enterprise

Author: Gallie

Publisher: CUP Archive

ISBN: 9780521292757

Category: Social Science

Page: 348

View: 623

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Privatism and the Working Class

Author: Fiona Devine

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Social Science

Page: 234

View: 8863

Fiona Devine's important new book offers a qualitative re-evaluation of the Affluent Worker study conducted by John Goldthorpe and his colleagues in Luton nearly thirty years ago. Drawing on her intensive interviews with Vauxhall workers and their wives, Devine examines the motivations, processes and consequences of geographical mobility and explores working-class lifestyles and the extent to which they may be described as privatised or communal. Contrary to the predictions of the older study, Devine's findings suggest that working-class lifestyles are neither exclusively family-centred, nor entirely home-centred. No evidence of a singular instrumentalism appears; instead aspirations for material well being form a crucial component of a collective working-class identity, with criticism of the trade unions and the Labour Party being directed at their failure to change the distribution of resources in Britain.
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Author: Pertti Alasuutari,Leonard Bickman,Julia Brannen

Publisher: SAGE

ISBN: 1473971268

Category: Social Science

Page: 648

View: 2694

The SAGE Handbook of Social Research Methods is a must for every social-science researcher. It charts the new and evolving terrain of social research methodology, covering qualitative, quantitative and mixed methods in one volume. The Handbook includes chapters on each phase of the research process: research design, methods of data collection, and the processes of analyzing and interpreting data. The volume maintains that there is much more to research than learning skills and techniques; methodology involves the fit between theory, research questions research design and analysis. The book also includes several chapters that describe historical and current directions in social research, debating crucial subjects such as qualitative versus quantitative paradigms, how to judge the credibility of types of research, and the increasingly topical issue of research ethics. The Handbook serves as an invaluable resource for approaching research with an open mind. This volume maps the field of social research methods using an approach that will prove valuable for both students and researchers.
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The Sociology of Relocation

Author: Michael Mann

Publisher: CUP Archive

ISBN: 9780521087018

Category: Social Science

Page: 265

View: 9375

This book tells the story of the complete move in 1965/1966 of Alfred Bird and Sons Limited from central Birmingham to Banbury, in which a large proportion of the labour force was successfully transferred. Focusing on the relocation decision made by individual employees, the author also contributed to many varied areas of debate.
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Author: Samantha Hillyard

Publisher: Berg

ISBN: 1845201388

Category: Social Science

Page: 188

View: 8477

Foot and mouth disease and BSE have both had a devastating impact on rural society. Alongside these devastating developments, the rise of the organic food movement has helped to revitalize an already politicized rural population. From fox-hunting to farming, the vigour with which rural activities and living are defended overturns received notions of a sleepy and complacent countryside. Over the years "rural life" has been defined, redefined and eventually fallen out of fashion as a sociological concept--in contrast to urban studies, which has flourished. This much-needed reappraisal calls for its reinterpretation in light of the profound changes affecting the countryside. First providing an overview of rural sociology, Hillyard goes on to offer contemporary case studies that clearly demonstrate the need for a reinvigorated rural sociology. Tackling a range of contentious issues--from fox-hunting to organic farming--this book offers a new model for rural sociology and reassesses its role in contemporary society.
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Author: Ray C. Hackman,American Management Association,Psychological Service of Pittsburgh

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Psychology

Page: 206

View: 5616

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Author: Huw Beynon

Publisher: Lane, Allen

ISBN: N.A

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 336

View: 2999

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How Companies Turn Their Workers into Lobbyists

Author: Alexander Hertel-Fernandez

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0190635444

Category: Political Science

Page: 256

View: 855

Employers are increasingly recruiting their workers into politics to change elections and public policy-sometimes in coercive ways. Using a diverse array of evidence, including national surveys of workers and employers, as well as in-depth interviews with top corporate managers, Alexander Hertel-Fernandez's Politics at Work explains why mobilization of workers has become an appealing corporate political strategy in recent decades. The book also assesses the effect of employer mobilization on the political process more broadly, including its consequences for electoral contests, policy debates, and political representation. Hertel-Fernandez shows that while employer political recruitment has some benefits for American democracy-for instance, getting more workers to the polls-it also has troubling implications for our democratic system. Workers face considerable pressure to respond to their managers' political requests because of the economic power employers possess over workers. In spite of these worrisome patterns, Hertel-Fernandez found that corporate managers view the mobilization of their own workers as an important strategy for influencing politics. As he shows, companies consider mobilization of their workers to be even more effective at changing public policy than making campaign contributions or buying electoral ads. Hertel-Fernandez closes with an array of solutions that could protect workers from employer political coercion and could also win the support of majorities of Americans. By carefully examining a growing yet underappreciated political practice, Politics at Work contributes to our understanding of the changing workplace, as well as the increasing power of corporations in American politics. It is essential reading for anyone interested in the connections between inequality, public policy, and American democracy.
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Overcoming Class Cluelessness in America

Author: Joan C. Williams

Publisher: Harvard Business Press

ISBN: 1633693791

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 192

View: 7027

Around the world, populist movements are gaining traction among the white working class. Meanwhile, members of the professional elite—journalists, managers, and establishment politicians—are on the outside looking in, left to argue over the reasons. In White Working Class, Joan C. Williams, described as having “something approaching rock star status” by the New York Times, explains why so much of the elite’s analysis of the white working class is misguided, rooted in class cluelessness. Williams explains that many people have conflated “working class” with “poor”—but the working class is, in fact, the elusive, purportedly disappearing middle class. They often resent the poor and the professionals alike. But they don’t resent the truly rich, nor are they particularly bothered by income inequality. Their dream is not to join the upper middle class, with its different culture, but to stay true to their own values in their own communities—just with more money. While white working-class motivations are often dismissed as racist or xenophobic, Williams shows that they have their own class consciousness. White Working Class is a blunt, bracing narrative that sketches a nuanced portrait of millions of people who have proven to be a potent political force. For anyone stunned by the rise of populist, nationalist movements, wondering why so many would seemingly vote against their own economic interests, or simply feeling like a stranger in their own country, White Working Class will be a convincing primer on how to connect with a crucial set of workers—and voters.
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The Reconfiguration of Work and Family Life in Contemporary Societies

Author: Rosemary Crompton

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1139450611

Category: Social Science

Page: N.A

View: 310

Rates of employment amongst mothers of young children have risen rapidly in recent years. Attitudes to gender roles have changed, and both employers and governments have had to adjust to new realities. But some argue that recent changes in employment relations are making work more family 'unfriendly'. What are the real consequences of change? Rosemary Crompton explores the origins and background of this radical shift in the gendered division of labour. Topics covered include the changing attitudes to gender roles and family life, the gendered organisational context, and recent changes in employment relations and their impact on work-life articulation. A comparative analysis of Britain, France, Norway, Finland, the United States and Portugal provides an assessment of the varying impact of state policies, and the changing domestic division of labour. Crompton draws on original research and situates her findings within contemporary theoretical and empirical debates.
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