Author: C. E. W. Steel

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521509939

Category: History

Page: 422

View: 9199

A comprehensive and authoritative account of one of the greatest and most prolific writers of classical antiquity.
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Author: Luca Grillo,Christopher B. Krebs

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1108215548

Category: History

Page: N.A

View: 6733

Well-known as a brilliant general and politician, Julius Caesar also played a fundamental role in the formation of the Latin literary language and remains a central figure in the history of Latin literature. With twenty-three chapters written by renowned scholars, this Companion provides an accessible introduction to Caesar as an intellectual along with a scholarly assessment of his multiple literary accomplishments and new insights into their literary value. The Commentarii and Caesar's lost works are presented in their historical and literary context. The various chapters explore their main features, the connection between literature, state religion and politics, Caesar's debt to previous Greek and Latin authors, and his legacy within and outside of Latin literature. The innovative volume will be of great value to all students and scholars of Latin literature and to those seeking a more rounded portrait of the achievements of Julius Caesar.
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Author: Jill Kraye,Kraye Jill

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521436243

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 320

View: 4151

Fourteen original essays providing a comprehensive introduction to Renaissance humanism.
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Author: Kirk Freudenburg

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521803595

Category: History

Page: 352

View: 9206

Satire as a distinct genre of writing was first developed by the Romans in the second century BCE. Regarded by them as uniquely 'their own', satire held a special place in the Roman imagination as the one genre that could address the problems of city life from the perspective of a 'real Roman'. In this Cambridge Companion an international team of scholars provides a stimulating introduction to Roman satire's core practitioners and practices, placing them within the contexts of Greco-Roman literary and political history. Besides addressing basic questions of authors, content, and form, the volume looks to the question of what satire 'does' within the world of Greco-Roman social exchanges, and goes on to treat the genre's further development, reception, and translation in Elizabethan England and beyond. Included are studies of the prosimetric, 'Menippean' satires that would become the models of Rabelais, Erasmus, More, and (narrative satire's crowning jewel) Swift.
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Author: David Sedley

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521775038

Category: Philosophy

Page: 396

View: 7570

This volume does not aim to reveal all of the mysteries of ancient philosophy to the novice, but it does aim to equip that reader with enough background material that he will be able to enter that world. Twelve overviews, each written by an authority in that area of philosophy, guides the reader through the principal schools of thought and the ideas of their main proponents. Concepts are sometimes explained in tables and are always supported by extracts but the main attraction of this work is that the contributors explain in layman's terms the basic ideas of philosophy and discuss clearly the logic of the ancient arguments. The book gets off to a good start with David Sedley's introduction which argues that Greek and Roman philosophers were mainly concerned with two dilemmas: what is a good life and why doesn't the earth fall. Includes a useful glossary.
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Author: Albert Russell Ascoli,Unn Falkeid

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107006147

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 280

View: 4328

An account of the life and works of Petrarch, scholar and poet, and his influence on European literature and culture.
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Author: Erik Gunderson

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1139827804

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 355

View: 6852

Rhetoric thoroughly infused the world and literature of Graeco-Roman antiquity. This Companion provides a comprehensive overview of rhetorical theory and practice in that world, from Homer to early Christianity, accessible to students and non-specialists, whether within classics or from other periods and disciplines. Its basic premise is that rhetoric is less a discrete object to be grasped and mastered than a hotly contested set of practices that include disputes over the very definition of rhetoric itself. Standard treatments of ancient oratory tend to take it too much in its own terms and to isolate it unduly from other social and cultural concerns. This volume provides an overview of the shape and scope of the problems while also identifying core themes and propositions: for example, persuasion, virtue, and public life are virtual constants. But they mix and mingle differently, and the contents designated by each of these terms can also shift.
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Author: Walter Scheidel

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521898226

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 443

View: 8881

Thanks to its exceptional size and duration, the Roman Empire offers one of the best opportunities to study economic development in the context of an agrarian world empire. This volume, which is organised thematically, provides a sophisticated introduction to and assessment of all aspects of its economic life.
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Author: Andrew Feldherr

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1139827693

Category: History

Page: N.A

View: 648

No field of Latin literature has been more transformed over the last couple of decades than that of the Roman historians. Narratology, a new receptiveness to intertextuality, and a re-thinking of the relationship between literature and its political contexts have ensured that the works of historians such as Livy, Sallust, and Tacitus will be read as texts with the same interest and sophistication as they are used as sources. In this book, topics central to the entire tradition, such as conceptions of time, characterization, and depictions of politics and the gods, are treated synoptically, while other essays highlight the works of less familiar historians, such as Curtius Rufus and Ammianus Marcellinus. A final section focuses on the rich reception history of Roman historiography, from the ancient Greek historians of Rome to the twentieth century. An appendix offers a chronological list of the ancient historians of Rome.
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Author: Harriet I. Flower

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1139992384

Category: History

Page: N.A

View: 7366

The Cambridge Companion to the Roman Republic examines all aspects of Roman history and civilization from 509 to 49 BC. The key development of the republican period was Rome's rise from a small city to a wealthy metropolis, which served as the international capital of an extensive Mediterranean empire. These centuries produced a classic republican political culture, closely associated with the growth of a world empire. They also witnessed the slow disintegration of republican government under the relentless and combined pressure of external commitments, growing internal dissension, and the boundless ambition of successful military leaders. In the second edition of this Companion volume, distinguished European, Canadian, and American scholars present a variety of lively current approaches to understanding the political, military, and social aspects of Roman history, as well as its literary and visual culture. The second edition includes a new introduction, three new chapters on population, slavery, and the rise of empire, and updated bibliographies and maps.
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Author: Shadi Bartsch,Alessandro Schiesaro

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107035058

Category: Drama

Page: 378

View: 5679

This Companion examines the complete works of Seneca in context and establishes the importance of his legacy in Western thought.
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Author: Markku Peltonen

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521435345

Category: Philosophy

Page: 372

View: 1728

New readers and specialists alike will find this the most convenient and accessible guide to Bacon available.
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Author: David Meconi, Sj,David Vincent Meconi,Eleonore Stump

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107025338

Category: Philosophy

Page: 404

View: 6467

This second edition of the Companion has been thoroughly revised and updated with eleven new chapters and a new bibliography.
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Author: Paul Erdkamp

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521896290

Category: History

Page: 625

View: 5057

Rome was the largest city in the ancient world. As the capital of the Roman Empire, it was clearly an exceptional city in terms of size, diversity and complexity. While the Colosseum, imperial palaces and Pantheon are among its most famous features, this volume explores Rome primarily as a city in which many thousands of men and women were born, lived and died. The thirty-one chapters by leading historians, classicists and archaeologists discuss issues ranging from the monuments and the games to the food and water supply, from policing and riots to domestic housing, from death and disease to pagan cults and the impact of Christianity. Richly illustrated, the volume introduces groundbreaking new research against the background of current debates and is designed as a readable survey accessible in particular to undergraduates and non-specialists.
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Author: Karl Galinsky

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521807968

Category: Art

Page: 407

View: 4197

The age of Augustus, commonly dated to 30 BC--AD 14, was a pivotal period in world history. A time of tremendous change in Rome, Italy, and throughout the Mediterranean world, many developments were underway when Augustus took charge and a recurring theme is the role that he played in shaping their direction. The Cambridge Companion to the Age of Augustus captures the dynamics and richness of this era by examining important aspects of political and social history, religion, literature, and art and architecture.
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Author: Brad Inwood

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521779852

Category: Philosophy

Page: 438

View: 2212

Introduction: Stoicism, an intellectual odyssey /Brad Inwood --The school, from Zeno to Arius Didymus /David Sedley --The school in the Roman imperial period /Christopher Gill --Stoic epistemology /R.J. Hankinson --Logic /Susanne Bobzien --Stoic natural philosophy (physics and cosmology) /Michael J. White --Stoic theology /Keimpe Algra --Stoic determinism /Dorothea Frede --Stoic metaphysics /Jacques Brunschwig --Stoic ethics /Malcolm Schofield --Stoic moral psychology /Tad Brennan --Stoicism and medicine /R.J. Hankinson --The stoic contribution to traditional grammar /David Blank and Catherine Atherton --The stoics and the astronomical sciences /Alexander Jones --Stoic naturalism and its critics /T.H. Irwin --Stoicism in the philosophical tradition: Spinoza, Lipsius, Butler /A.A. Long.
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Author: James Hankins

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781139827485

Category: Philosophy

Page: N.A

View: 1243

The Cambridge Companion to Renaissance Philosophy, published in 2007, provides an introduction to a complex period of change in the subject matter and practice of philosophy. The philosophy of the fourteenth through sixteenth centuries is often seen as transitional between the scholastic philosophy of the Middle Ages and modern philosophy, but the essays collected here, by a distinguished international team of contributors, call these assumptions into question, emphasizing both the continuity with scholastic philosophy and the role of Renaissance philosophy in the emergence of modernity. They explore the ways in which the science, religion and politics of the period reflect and are reflected in its philosophical life, and they emphasize the dynamism and pluralism of a period which saw both new perspectives and enduring contributions to the history of philosophy. This will be an invaluable guide for students of philosophy, intellectual historians, and all who are interested in Renaissance thought.
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Author: A. J. Woodman

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1139828207

Category: History

Page: N.A

View: 1245

Tacitus is universally recognised as ancient Rome's greatest writer of history, and his account of the Roman Empire in the first century AD has been fundamental in shaping the modern perception of Rome and its emperors. This Companion provides a new, up-to-date and authoritative assessment of his work and influence which will be invaluable for students and non-specialists as well as of interest to established scholars in the field. First situating Tacitus within the tradition of Roman historical writing and his own contemporary society, it goes on to analyse each of his individual works and then discuss key topics such as his distinctive authorial voice and his views of history and freedom. It ends by tracing Tacitus' reception, beginning with the transition from manuscript to printed editions, describing his influence on political thought in early modern Europe, and concluding with his significance in the twentieth century.
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Author: David Johnston

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521895642

Category: History

Page: 552

View: 1089

This book reflects the wide range of current scholarship on Roman law, covering private, criminal and public law.
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Author: Stuart Gillespie,Philip Hardie

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781139827522

Category: History

Page: N.A

View: 6168

Lucretius' didactic poem De rerum natura ('On the Nature of Things') is an impassioned and visionary presentation of the materialist philosophy of Epicurus, and one of the most powerful poetic texts of antiquity. After its rediscovery in 1417 it became a controversial and seminal work in successive phases of literary history, the history of science, and the Enlightenment. In this 2007 Cambridge Companion experts in the history of literature, philosophy and science discuss the poem in its ancient contexts and in its reception both as a literary text and as a vehicle for progressive ideas. The Companion is designed both as an accessible handbook for the general reader who wishes to learn about Lucretius, and as a series of stimulating essays for students of classical antiquity and its reception. It is completely accessible to the reader who has only read Lucretius in translation.
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