Author: Andrew Lintott

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 9780191584671

Category: History

Page: 310

View: 4623

There is no other published book in English studying the constitution of the Roman Republic as a whole. Yet the Greek historian Polybius believed that the constitution was a fundamental cause of the exponential growth of Rome's empire. He regarded the Republic as unusual in two respects: first, because it functioned so well despite being a mix of monarchy, oligarchy and democracy; secondly, because the constitution was the product of natural evolution rather than the ideals of a lawgiver. Even if historians now seek more widely for the causes of Rome's rise to power, the importance and influence of her political institutions remains. The reasons for Rome's power are both complex, on account of the mix of elements, and flexible, inasmuch as they were not founded on written statutes but on unwritten traditions reinterpreted by successive generations. Knowledge of Rome's political institutions is essential both for ancient historians and for those who study the contribution of Rome to the republican tradition of political thought from the Middle Ages to the revolutions inspired by the Enlightenment.
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Author: Nathan Rosenstein,Robert Morstein-Marx

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 1444357204

Category: History

Page: 776

View: 6390

This Companion provides an authoritative and up-to-date overview of Roman Republican history as it is currently practiced. Highlights recent developments, including archaeological discoveries, fresh approaches to textual sources, and the opening up of new areas of historical study Retains the drama of the Republic’s rise and fall Emphasizes not just the evidence of texts and physical remains, but also the models and assumptions that scholars bring to these artefacts Looks at the role played by the physical geography and environment of Italy Offers a compact but detailed narrative of military and political developments from the birth of the Roman Republic through to the death of Julius Caesar Discusses current controversies in the field
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Addresses on the History of Roman Constitutionalism

Author: Robert C. Byrd

Publisher: Government Printing Office

ISBN: 9780160589966

Category:

Page: 189

View: 3223

Provides a series of fourteen addresses delivered in 1993 before the Senate by Senator Robert C. Byrd. Discusses the constitutional history of separated and shared powers as shaped in the republic and empire of ancient Rome. These lectures are also in opposition to the proposed line-item veto concept. The introduction states that Senator Byrd delivered these speeches entirely from memory and without notes.
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Roman Political Thought from the Fall of the Republic to the Age of Revolution

Author: Benjamin Straumann

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0190614005

Category: Political Science

Page: N.A

View: 5745

Crisis and Constitutionalism argues that the late Roman Republic saw, for the first time in the history of political thought, the development of a normative concept of constitution--the concept of a set of constitutional norms designed to guarantee and achieve certain interests of the individual. Benjamin Straumann first explores how a Roman concept of constitution emerged out of the crisis and fall of the Roman Republic. The increasing use of emergency measures and extraordinary powers in the late Republic provoked Cicero and some of his contemporaries to turn a hitherto implicit, inchoate constitutionalism into explicit constitutional argument and theory. The crisis of the Republic thus brought about a powerful constitutionalism and convinced Cicero to articulate the norms and rights that would provide its substance; this typically Roman constitutional theory is described in the second part of the study. Straumann then discusses the reception of Roman constitutional thought up to the late eighteenth century and the American Founding, which gave rise to a new, constitutional republicanism. This tradition was characterized by a keen interest in the Roman Republic's decline and fall, and an insistence on the limits of virtue. The crisis of the Republic was interpreted as a constitutional crisis, and the only remedy to escape the Republic's fate--military despotism--was thought to lie, not in republican virtue, but in Roman constitutionalism. By tracing Roman constitutional thought from antiquity to the modern era, this unique study makes a substantial contribution to our understanding of Roman political thought and its reception.
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Author: Klaus Bringmann

Publisher: Polity

ISBN: 0745633714

Category: History

Page: 368

View: 825

In this new and authoritative history of the Roman republic, distinguished historian Klaus Bringmann traces the rise of a small city state near the Tiber estuary into a power that controlled the Italian peninsula and created the final Empire of antiquity, an Empire that was to become both the most enduring in the ancient world and to have the most far-reaching consequences for posterity. Whilst this book is chronologically organized, giving the reader a clear sense of the historical progress and dynamics of Roman republican history, it also offers a coherent and authoritative overview of the culture, economics, religion and military might of the Roman empire, presented in an original and stimulating way. Thoroughly referenced and illustrated throughout, with a wealth of primary sources from great Roman writers such as Cicero and Plutarch, A History of the Roman Republic will be essential reading for university students in history and classical studies. It will also appeal to a wider audience of general readers who are interested in the history of the Ancient world and its legacy.
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Author: Harriet I. Flower

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521003902

Category: Art

Page: 405

View: 1007

This companion examines all aspects of Roman history and civilization from the founding of the republic in 509 BC to the crossing of the Rubicon in 49 BC, by which Julius Ceasar precipitated the civil war against Pompey that led first to his dictatorship & subsequently to the Augustan empire.
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A Sourcebook

Author: Dr Barbara Levick,Barbara Levick

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134572638

Category: History

Page: 312

View: 9539

This book reveals how an empire that stretched from Glasgow to Aswan in Egypt could be ruled from a single city and still survive more than a thousand years. The Government of the Roman Empire is the only sourcebook to concentrate on the administration of the empire, using the evidence of contemporary writers and historians. Specifically designed for students, with extensive cross-referencing, bibliographies and introductions and explanations for each item, this new edition brings the book right up-to-date, and makes it the ideal resource for students of the subject.
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Author: Henrik Mouritsen

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107031885

Category: History

Page: 202

View: 3575

The politics of the Roman Republic has in recent decades been the subject of intense debate, covering issues such as the degree of democracy and popular influence, 'parties' and ideology, politics as public ritual, and the character of Rome's political culture. This engaging book examines all these issues afresh, and presents an original synthesis of Rome's political institutions and practices. It begins by explaining the development of the Roman constitution over time before turning to the practical functioning of the Republic, focusing particularly on the role of the populus Romanus and the way its powers were expressed in the popular assemblies. Henrik Mouritsen concludes by exploring continuity and change in Roman politics as well as the process by which the republican system was eventually replaced by monarchy. This original and readable book will be important for all students and scholars of Roman history and of politics in general.
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Author: Harriet I. Flower

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 1400831164

Category: History

Page: 224

View: 386

From the Renaissance to today, the idea that the Roman Republic lasted more than 450 years--persisting unbroken from the late sixth century to the mid-first century BC--has profoundly shaped how Roman history is understood, how the ultimate failure of Roman republicanism is explained, and how republicanism itself is defined. In Roman Republics, Harriet Flower argues for a completely new interpretation of republican chronology. Radically challenging the traditional picture of a single monolithic republic, she argues that there were multiple republics, each with its own clearly distinguishable strengths and weaknesses. While classicists have long recognized that the Roman Republic changed and evolved over time, Flower is the first to mount a serious argument against the idea of republican continuity that has been fundamental to modern historical study. By showing that the Romans created a series of republics, she reveals that there was much more change--and much less continuity--over the republican period than has previously been assumed. In clear and elegant prose, Roman Republics provides not only a reevaluation of one of the most important periods in western history but also a brief yet nuanced survey of Roman political life from archaic times to the end of the republican era.
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The Beginning of the End of the Roman Republic

Author: Mike Duncan

Publisher: PublicAffairs

ISBN: 1610397223

Category: History

Page: 352

View: 8026

NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER The creator of the award-winning podcast series The History of Rome and Revolutions brings to life the bloody battles, political machinations, and human drama that set the stage for the fall of the Roman Republic. The Roman Republic was one of the most remarkable achievements in the history of civilization. Beginning as a small city-state in central Italy, Rome gradually expanded into a wider world filled with petty tyrants, barbarian chieftains, and despotic kings. Through the centuries, Rome's model of cooperative and participatory government remained remarkably durable and unmatched in the history of the ancient world. In 146 BC, Rome finally emerged as the strongest power in the Mediterranean. But the very success of the Republic proved to be its undoing. The republican system was unable to cope with the vast empire Rome now ruled: rising economic inequality disrupted traditional ways of life, endemic social and ethnic prejudice led to clashes over citizenship and voting rights, and rampant corruption and ruthless ambition sparked violent political clashes that cracked the once indestructible foundations of the Republic. Chronicling the years 146-78 BC, The Storm Before the Storm dives headlong into the first generation to face this treacherous new political environment. Abandoning the ancient principles of their forbearers, men like Marius, Sulla, and the Gracchi brothers set dangerous new precedents that would start the Republic on the road to destruction and provide a stark warning about what can happen to a civilization that has lost its way.
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Author: Valentina Arena

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1139620169

Category: History

Page: N.A

View: 3382

This is a comprehensive analysis of the idea of libertas and its conflicting uses in the political struggles of the late Roman Republic. By reconstructing Roman political thinking about liberty against the background of Classical and Hellenistic thought, it excavates two distinct intellectual traditions on the means allowing for the preservation and the loss of libertas. Considering the interplay of these traditions in the political debates of the first century BC, Dr Arena offers a significant reinterpretation of the political struggles of the time as well as a radical reappraisal of the role played by the idea of liberty in the practice of politics. She argues that, as a result of its uses in rhetorical debates, libertas underwent a form of conceptual change at the end of the Republic and came to legitimise a new course of politics, which led progressively to the transformation of the whole political system.
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Why Economic Inequality Threatens Our Republic

Author: Ganesh Sitaraman

Publisher: Knopf

ISBN: 0451493915

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 423

View: 5351

"Argues that America's strong and sizable middle class is actually embedded in the framework of the nation's government and its founding document and discusses the necessity of taking equality-establishing measures,"--NoveList.
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Author: Fred K. Drogula

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 1469621274

Category: History

Page: 432

View: 3436

In this work, Fred Drogula studies the development of Roman provincial command using the terms and concepts of the Romans themselves as reference points. Beginning in the earliest years of the republic, Drogula argues, provincial command was not a uniform concept fixed in positive law but rather a dynamic set of ideas shaped by traditional practice. Therefore, as the Roman state grew, concepts of authority, control over territory, and military power underwent continual transformation. This adaptability was a tremendous resource for the Romans since it enabled them to respond to new military challenges in effective ways. But it was also a source of conflict over the roles and definitions of power. The rise of popular politics in the late republic enabled men like Pompey and Caesar to use their considerable influence to manipulate the flexible traditions of military command for their own advantage. Later, Augustus used nominal provincial commands to appease the senate even as he concentrated military and governing power under his own control by claiming supreme rule. In doing so, he laid the groundwork for the early empire's rules of command.
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The Rulers of Ancient Rome from Romulus to Augustus

Author: Philip Matyszak

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780500287637

Category: History

Page: 240

View: 6192

New in paperback, here is a highly readable account of 56 of the extraordinary characters whose lives were the defining threads in the great adventure and final tragedy that was the Roman Republic. In this history we see the best and worst of the Roman élite superstitious, brutal and utterly uncompromising, but often men of great honour and principle. This highly readable and authoritative account is ideal for home or school reference, and as a companion to the bestselling Chronicle of the Roman Emperors.
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An Ancient Political Culture and Modern Research

Author: Karl-J. Hölkeskamp

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 1400834902

Category: History

Page: 232

View: 4721

In recent decades, scholars have argued that the Roman Republic's political culture was essentially democratic in nature, stressing the central role of the 'sovereign' people and their assemblies. Karl-J. Hölkeskamp challenges this view in Reconstructing the Roman Republic, warning that this scholarly trend threatens to become the new orthodoxy, and defending the position that the republic was in fact a uniquely Roman, dominantly oligarchic and aristocratic political form. Hölkeskamp offers a comprehensive, in-depth survey of the modern debate surrounding the Roman Republic. He looks at the ongoing controversy first triggered in the 1980s when the 'oligarchic orthodoxy' was called into question by the idea that the republic's political culture was a form of Greek-style democracy, and he considers the important theoretical and methodological advances of the 1960s and 1970s that prepared the ground for this debate. Hölkeskamp renews and refines the 'elitist' view, showing how the republic was a unique kind of premodern city-state political culture shaped by a specific variant of a political class. He covers a host of fascinating topics, including the Roman value system; the senatorial aristocracy; competition in war and politics within this aristocracy; and the symbolic language of public rituals and ceremonies, monuments, architecture, and urban topography. Certain to inspire continued debate, Reconstructing the Roman Republic offers fresh approaches to the study of the republic while attesting to the field's enduring vitality. Some images inside the book are unavailable due to digital copyright restrictions.
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The Making of the World's Greatest Empire

Author: Anthony Everitt

Publisher: Random House Incorporated

ISBN: 1400066638

Category: History

Page: 478

View: 1868

Traces the rise of Rome as an unlikely evolution from a market village to the world's most powerful empire, offering insight into its political clashes, military strategies, leading figures, and internal corruptions.
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Author: Andrew William Lintott

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN: 9780198152828

Category: History

Page: 240

View: 5474

This book examines the roots of violence in Roman Republican law and society and the growth of violence in city war and the power of armies. It discusses political conflict, violence, military insurrection, and authoritarian government of the Republic.
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The Rise Of The Roman Army And The Fall Of The Republic

Author: Erik Hildinger

Publisher: Da Capo Press

ISBN: 9780786741816

Category: History

Page: 256

View: 7648

In the first century B.C., Rome was the ruler of a vast empire. Yet at the heart of the Republic was a fatal flaw: a dangerous hostility between the aristocracy and the plebians, each regarding itself as the foundation of Rome's military power. Turning from their foreign enemies, Romans would soon be fighting Romans.Swords Against the Senate describes the first three decades of Rome's century-long civil war that transformed it from a republic to an imperial autocracy, from the Rome of citizen leaders to the Rome of decadent emperor thugs. As the republic came apart amid turmoil, Gaius Marius, the "people's general," rose to despotic power only to be replaced by the brutal dictator Sulla. The Roman army, once invincible against foreign antagonists, became a tool for the powerful, and the Roman Senate its foe.
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Author: Andrew Lintott

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 9781444319323

Category: History

Page: 216

View: 7072

Incorporating the most recent scholarship, this book offers a fascinating history of Rome and the Roman peoples during the rule of the first Roman emperor, Augustus. Written in an easily accessible style, making it the ideal introduction to Augustan Rome for those with little previous knowledge Offers compelling insight into the workings of Roman society during this pivotal period in its history Incorporates the most recent scholarship on aspects of Augustus's reign including the armed forces, religion, and intellectual and cultural life Andrew Lintott is a widely respected expert on the Roman Republic
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The Last Years of the Roman Republic

Author: Tom Holland

Publisher: Doubleday Books

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 408

View: 6747

Recounts the fall of the Roman Republic, tracing the events that marked the final century B.C. and discussing such topics as the rise of Alexandria and the contributions of such figures as Caesar, Cleopatra, Brutus, and Augustus.
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