Author: Alfred Bendixen,James Nagel

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 9781444319927

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 536

View: 5160

A Companion to the American Short Story traces thedevelopment of this versatile literary genre over the past 200years. Sets the short story in context, paying attention to theinteraction of cultural forces and aesthetic principles Contributes to the ongoing redefinition of the American canon,with close attention to the achievements of women writers as wellas such important genres as the ghost story and detectivefiction Embraces diverse traditions including African-American,Jewish-American, Latino, Native-American, and regional short storywriting Includes a section focused on specific authors and texts, fromEdgar Allen Poe to John Updike
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Author: Jennifer J. Smith

Publisher: Edinburgh University Press

ISBN: 1474423949

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 304

View: 3942

A critical overview of the USA efforts to prevent Iran from building nuclear weapons, from the 1970s to 2015
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Author: M. Bostrom

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 0230607489

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 224

View: 6005

This book reveals a female sexual economy in the marketplace of contemporary short fiction which locates a struggle for sexual power between mothers and daughters within a larger struggle to pursue that object of the American dream: whiteness.
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Author: Lucy Evans

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 1781386048

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 230

View: 1422

This book examines the representation of community in contemporary Anglophone Caribbean short stories, focusing on the most recent wave of Caribbean short story writers following the genre's revival in the mid 1980s. The first extended study of Caribbean short stories, it presents the phenomenon of interconnected stories as a significant feature of late twentieth and early twenty-first century Anglophone Caribbean literary cultures. It contends that the short story collection and cycle, literary forms regarded by genre theorists as necessarily concerned with representations of community, are particularly appropriate and enabling as a vehicle through which to conceptualise Caribbean communities. The book covers short story collections and cycles by Olive Senior, Earl Lovelace, Kwame Dawes, Alecia Mckenzie, Lawrence Scott, Mark Mcwatt, Robert Antoni and Dionne Brand. It argues that the form of interconnected stories is a crucial part of these writers' imagining of communities which may be fractured, plural and fraught with tensions, but which nevertheless hold together. The book takes an interdisciplinary approach to the study of community, bringing literary representations of community into dialogue with models of community developed in the field of Caribbean anthropology. The works analysed are set in Trinidad, Jamaica and Guyana, and in several cases the setting extends to the Caribbean diaspora in Europe and North America. Looking in turn at rural, urban, national and global communities, the book draws attention to changing conceptions of community around the turn of the millennium.
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a genre companion and reference guide

Author: Susan Garland Mann

Publisher: Greenwood Pub Group

ISBN: 9780313250811

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 228

View: 7975

"This guide is an excellent beginning for the study of a little-recognized genre. . . ." Choice
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Author: Patrick Gill,Florian Kläger

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1351382136

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 274

View: 3626

The first major collection of essays on the contemporary British short story cycle, this volume offers in-depth explorations of the genre by comparing its strategies for creating coherence with those of the novel and the short story collection, inquiring after the ties that bind individual short stories into a cycle. A section on theory approaches the form from the point of view of genre theory, cognitive literary studies, and book studies. It is followed by investigations of hitherto neglected aspects of the generic tradition of the British short story cycle and how they relate to the contemporary outlook of the form. Readings of individual contemporary cycles, illustrating the form’s multifaceted uses from the presentation of sexual identities to politics and trauma, make up the third and most substantial part of the volume, placing its focus squarely on the past decades. Unique in its combination of a focus on the literary traditions, politics and markets of the UK with a thorough examination of the genre’s manifold formal and thematic potentials, the volume explores what is at the heart of the short story cycle as a literary form: the constant negotiation between unity and separateness, collective and individual, of coherence and autonomy.
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Author: Kasia Boddy

Publisher: Edinburgh University Press

ISBN: 0748686533

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 184

View: 2025

This book focuses specifically on short fiction written since 1950, a particularly rich and diverse period in the history of the form. A selective approach has been taken, focusing on the best and most representative work.
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Facts on File Companion to the American Short Story

Author: Abby H. P. Werlock

Publisher: Infobase Publishing

ISBN: 143812743X

Category: Short stories, American

Page: 842

View: 1309

This encyclopedia features an informative introduction that surveys the history of the short story in the United States, interprets the current literary landscape, and points to new and future trends. --from publisher description.
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Author: Julie Brown

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134822227

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 272

View: 325

How do different ethnic groups approach the short story form? Do different groups develop culture-related themes? Do oral traditions within a particular culture shape the way in which written stories are told? Why does "the community" loom so large in ethnic stories? How do such traditional forms as African American slave narratives or the Chinese talk-story shape the modern short story? Which writers of color should be added to the canon? Why have some minority writers been ignored for such a long time? How does a person of color write for white publishers, editors, and readers? Each essay in this collection of original studies addresses these questions and other related concerns. It is common knowledge that most scholarly work on the short story has been on white writers: This collection is the first work to specifically focus on short story practice by ethnic minorities in America, ranging from African Americans to Native Americans, Chinese Americans to Hispanic Americans. The number of women writers discussed will be of particular interest to women studies and genre studies researchers, and the collections will be of vital interest to scholars working in American literature, narrative theory, and multicultural studies.
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The Short Story Cycle in Transition

Author: Maggie Dunn,Ann R. Morris

Publisher: Twayne Pub

ISBN: N.A

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 192

View: 1713

This groundbreaking study is the first to propose and support a comprehensive theory of genre for composite literary texts. Though recent criticism has used the term "short story cycle" to categorize such classic works as Sherwood Anderson's Winesburg, Ohio and Sarah Orne Jewett's The Country of the Pointed Firs, until now no such name has been found to account adequately for other composite works such as William Faulkner's Go Down, Moses or Jean Toomer's Cane. A composite novel, the authors persuasively argue, is a literary work composed of shorter texts that - though individually complete and autonomous - are interrelated in a coherent whole according to one or more organizing principles. The authors trace the 200-year history of the form, from its beginnings in the village-sketch tradition of the early nineteenth century through the experimental works of contemporary writers. With its focus on both classic and contemporary texts, The Composite Novel provides an inclusive, multinational, and multicultural perspective that demonstrates the diversity of this long-misunderstood genre. A flexible form that welcomes multiple perspectives, the composite novel has had great appeal to writers from marginalized groups. In particular, Dunn and Morris assert the pivotal role of nineteenth-century women writers in shaping the composite novel, in sharp contrast to the linear narratives popularized by their better-known male counterparts. To support their argument, the authors provide a bibliographic essay that traces the history of criticism on the composite novel, reflecting the puzzle that the genre posed to previous scholars. A chronological list of major composite novels and their precursors, as well as an annotated list of selected works especially representative of the genre, rounds out the study. With this comprehensive work, the composite novel receives its due as a rich and flexible genre, producing literary masterpieces that expand the limits of literature.
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Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Literature

Page: N.A

View: 2450

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Kate Chopin, Grace King, Alice Dunbar-Nelson, and George Washington Cable

Author: James Nagel

Publisher: University of Alabama Press

ISBN: 0817313389

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 208

View: 3380

Race and Culture in New Orleans Storiesposits that the Crescent City and the surrounding Louisiana bayous were a logical setting for the literary exploration of crucial social problems in America. Race and Culture in New Orleans Stories is a study of four volumes of interrelated short stories set in New Orleans and the surrounding Louisiana bayous: Kate Chopin’s Bayou Folk; George Washington Cable’s Old Creole Days; Grace King’s Balcony Stories; and Alice Dunbar-Nelson’s The Goodness of St. Rocque and Other Stories. James Nagel argues that the conflicts and themes in these stories cannot be understood without a knowledge of the unique historical context of the founding of Louisiana, its four decades of rule by the Spanish, the Louisiana Purchase and the resulting cultural transformations across the region, Napoleonic law, the Code Noir, the plaçage tradition, the immigration of various ethnic and natural groups into the city, and the effects of the Civil War and Reconstruction. All of these historical factors energize and enrich the fiction of this important region. The literary context of these volumes is also central to understanding their place in literary history. They are short-story cycles—collections of short fiction that contain unifying settings, recurring characters or character types, and central themes and motifs. They are also examples of the “local color” tradition in fiction, a movement that has been much misunderstood. Nagel maintains that regional literature was meant to be the highest form of American writing, not the lowest, and its objective was to capture the locations, folkways, values, dialects, conflicts, and ways of life in the various regions of the country in order to show that the lives of common citizens were sufficiently important to be the subject of serious literature. Finally, Nagel shows that New Orleans provided a profoundly rich and complex setting for the literary exploration of some of the most crucial social problems in America, including racial stratification, social caste, economic exploitation, and gender roles, all of which were undergoing rapid transformation at the end of the nineteenth century and the beginning of the twentieth.
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Author: N.A

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9004311017

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 228

View: 2191

Sherwood Anderson’s Winesburg, Ohio, revisits a classic, twentieth-century American text. Scholars from around the world look closely at gender relations, masculinity, place, the nature of community, and the elusive American Dream.
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Theory of a Genre

Author: Florence Goyet

Publisher: Open Book Publishers

ISBN: 1909254754

Category: Fiction

Page: 220

View: 9270

The ability to construct a nuanced narrative or complex character in the constrained form of the short story has sometimes been seen as the ultimate test of an author's creativity. Yet during the time when the short story was at its most popular - the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries - even the greatest writers followed strict generic conventions that were far from subtle. This expanded and updated translation of Florence Goyet's influential La Nouvelle, 1870-1925: Description d'un genre à son apogée (Paris, 1993) is the only study to focus exclusively on this classic period across different continents. Ranging through French, English, Italian, Russian and Japanese writing - particularly the stories of Guy de Maupassant, Henry James, Giovanni Verga, Anton Chekhov and Akutagawa Ry?nosuke - Goyet shows that these authors were able to create brilliant and successful short stories using the very simple 'tools of brevity' of that period. In this challenging and far-reaching study, Goyet looks at classic short stories in the context in which they were read at the time: cheap newspapers and higher-end periodicals. She demonstrates that, despite the apparent intention of these stories to question bourgeois ideals, they mostly affirmed the prejudices of their readers. In doing so, her book forces us to re-think our preconceptions about this 'forgotten' genre.
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