Author: Hugh Tulloch

Publisher: Manchester University Press

ISBN: 9780719049385

Category: History

Page: 255

View: 9340

This study is the first to critically survey the changing and highly controversial historical literature surrounding the American Civil War era, from contemporary interpretations up to the present. The racial question was one of the central causes of the war; there was recognition of the need for America to conform wholly to the Declaration of Independence that "all men are created equal." The book both analyzes historians' attitudes and assumptions, and suggests that each writer's perspective was partly determined by the dictates of time and place.
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Author: Hugh Tulloch

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134583494

Category: History

Page: 200

View: 8301

Arguably one of the most significant periods in US history, the American Civil War era continues to fascinate. In this essential reference guide to the period, Hugh Tulloch examines the war itself, alongside the political, constitutional, social, economic, literary and religious developments and trends that informed and were formed by the turbulent events that took place during America’s nineteenth century. Key themes examined here are: emancipation and the quest for racial justice abolitionism and debates regarding freedom versus slavery the confederacy and reconstruction civil war military strategy industry and agriculture Presidential elections and party politics cultural and intellectual developments. Including a compendium of information through timelines, chronologies, bibliographies and guides to sources as well, students of American history and the civil war will want a copy of this by their side.
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Spring 2014 Issue

Author: William A. Blair

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 1469615975

Category: History

Page: 278

View: 3896

The Journal of the Civil War Era Volume 4, Number 1 March 2014 TABLE OF CONTENTS Articles Nicholas Marshall The Great Exaggeration: Death and the Civil War Sarah Bischoff Paulus America's Long Eulogy for Compromise: Henry Clay and American Politics, 1854-58 Ted Maris-Wolf "Of Blood and Treasure": Recaptive Africans and the Politics of Slave Trade Suppression Review Essay W. Caleb McDaniel The Bonds and Boundaries of Antislavery Book Reviews Books Received Professional Notes Craig A. Warren Lincoln's Body: The President in Popular Films of the Sesquicentennial Notes on Contributors
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A Biographical Dictionary

Author: Dan Monroe,Bruce Tap

Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group

ISBN: 9780313317453

Category: History

Page: 405

View: 8301

Introduces students to the individuals who have contributed to the debate on the Civil War.
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Author: Brent E. Kinser

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317045270

Category: History

Page: 206

View: 9914

When the American Civil War broke out in 1861, a central question for British intellectuals was whether or not the American conflict was proof of the viability of democracy as a foundation for modern governance. The lessons of the American Civil War for Britain would remain a focal point in the debate on democracy throughout the war up to the suffrage reform of 1867, and after. Brent E. Kinser considers four figures connected by Woodrow Wilson's concept of the "Literary Politician," a person who, while possessing a profound knowledge of politics combined with an equally acute literary ability to express that knowledge, escapes the practical drudgeries of policy making. Kinser argues that the animosity of Thomas Carlyle towards democracy, the rhetorical strategy of Anthony Trollope's North America, the centrality of the American war in Walter Bagehot's vision of British governance, and the political philosophy of John Stuart Mill illustrate the American conflict's vital presence in the debates leading up to the 1867 reform, a legislative event that helped to secure democracy's place in the British political system.
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Author: Kevern Verney

Publisher: Manchester University Press

ISBN: 9780719067617

Category: History

Page: 196

View: 820

In recent years African American history has been a major growth area in respect to scholarly research. This book provides a clear, concise historiographical perspective on the enormous volume of scholarly work available on this subject.
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Author: Randall M. Miller,Harry S. Stout,Charles Reagan Wilson

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199923663

Category: History

Page: 448

View: 7030

The sixteen essays in this volume, all previously unpublished, address the little considered question of the role played by religion in the American Civil War. The authors show that religion, understood in its broadest context as a culture and community of faith, was found wherever the war was found. Comprising essays by such scholars as Elizabeth Fox-Genovese, Drew Gilpin Faust, Mark Noll, Reid Mitchell, Harry Stout, and Bertram Wyatt-Brown, and featuring an afterword by James McPherson, this collection marks the first step towards uncovering this crucial yet neglected aspect of American history.
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Author: Mark E. Neely Jr.

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

ISBN: 9780807876947

Category: History

Page: 176

View: 677

Did preoccupations with family and work crowd out interest in politics in the nineteenth century, as some have argued? Arguing that social historians have gone too far in concluding that Americans were not deeply engaged in public life and that political historians have gone too far in asserting that politics informed all of Americans' lives, Mark Neely seeks to gauge the importance of politics for ordinary people in the Civil War era. Looking beyond the usual markers of political activity, Neely sifts through the political bric-a-brac of the era--lithographs and engravings of political heroes, campaign buttons, songsters filled with political lyrics, photo albums, newspapers, and political cartoons. In each of four chapters, he examines a different sphere--the home, the workplace, the gentlemen's Union League Club, and the minstrel stage--where political engagement was expressed in material culture. Neely acknowledges that there were boundaries to political life, however. But as his investigation shows, political expression permeated the public and private realms of Civil War America.
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The Enduring Significance of the American Civil War

Author: Susan-Mary Grant,Peter J. Parish

Publisher: LSU Press

ISBN: 9780807128473

Category: History

Page: 267

View: 9746

"This collection explores that question from a variety of angles, showcasing the work of twelve scholars from the United States and the United Kingdom. The essays ponder the role of history, myth, and media in sustaining the memory of the war and its racial implications in the South; Abraham Lincoln's legacy; and the war's consequences in less studied areas, such as civil-military relations, constitutional and legal history, and America's ascent on the international stage. By juxtaposing American and non-American interpretations, this stimulating volume sheds light on aspects of the war's legacy that from a purely American viewpoint are sometimes too close for comfort. Perhaps the greatest legacy of the Civil War is its ongoing debate and continuing fascination worldwide."--BOOK JACKET.
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Antislavery and Proslavery Liberalism in Antebellum America

Author: David F. Ericson

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 9780814722121

Category: History

Page: 241

View: 4311

In 1914, H. Rider Haggardadventure novelist, diplomat, farmer, lawyer, and, above all, renowned author of such classic and influential bestsellers asKing Solomon's MinesandShereturned to South Africa, the country that had fired his literary imagination, for the first time in a quarter century. Haggard, whose work is today considered a prototype of colonial literature, barely recognized the Africa of his youth. The discovery of gold, the destruction of the Zulu kingdom, and the aftermath of the Anglo-Boer war had all radically transformed the political, cultural, and often physical landscape. No longer the diehard imperialist of his youth, when conquest and colonization were the order of the day, Haggard toured southern Africa extensively during this trip, acquiring an impression of black politics and even meeting the first president of the African National Congress, John Dube. This is the chronicle, in Haggard's own hand, of that journey. A remarkable literary find, written by a man who helped shape Western perceptions of Africa, this hitherto unpublished manuscript presents a portrait both surprising and in some ways familiar of Africa and of a central figure in the literature of African colonialism.
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A New History of the Civil War and Reconstruction

Author: Allen C. Guelzo

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199939365

Category: History

Page: 592

View: 1250

The Civil War is the greatest trauma ever experienced by the American nation, a four-year paroxysm of violence that left in its wake more than 600,000 dead, more than 2 million refugees, and the destruction (in modern dollars) of more than $700 billion in property. The war also sparked some of the most heroic moments in American history and enshrined a galaxy of American heroes. Above all, it permanently ended the practice of slavery and proved, in an age of resurgent monarchies, that a liberal democracy could survive the most frightful of challenges. In Fateful Lightning, two-time Lincoln Prize-winning historian Allen C. Guelzo offers a marvelous portrait of the Civil War and its era, covering not only the major figures and epic battles, but also politics, religion, gender, race, diplomacy, and technology. And unlike other surveys of the Civil War era, it extends the reader's vista to include the postwar Reconstruction period and discusses the modern-day legacy of the Civil War in American literature and popular culture. Guelzo also puts the conflict in a global perspective, underscoring Americans' acute sense of the vulnerability of their republic in a world of monarchies. He examines the strategy, the tactics, and especially the logistics of the Civil War and brings the most recent historical thinking to bear on emancipation, the presidency and the war powers, the blockade and international law, and the role of intellectuals, North and South. Written by a leading authority on our nation's most searing crisis, Fateful Lightning offers a vivid and original account of an event whose echoes continue with Americans to this day.
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A Hands-on History

Author: Christopher J. Olsen

Publisher: Hill and Wang

ISBN: 9780374707316

Category: History

Page: 304

View: 3042

Succinct, with a brace of original documents following each chapter, Christopher J. Olsen's The American Civil War is the ideal introduction to American history's most famous, and infamous, chapter. Covering events from 1850 and the mounting political pressures to split the Union into opposing sections, through the four years of bloodshed and waning Confederate fortunes, to Lincoln's assassination and the advent of Reconstruction, The American Civil War covers the entire sectional conflict and at every juncture emphasizes the decisions and circumstances, large and small, that determined the course of events.
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Expatriation in America from the Colonial Era to the War on Terror

Author: Ben Herzog,Ediberto Román

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 0814760384

Category: Law

Page: 216

View: 2119

"In 'Revoking Citizenship', Ben Herzog reveals America's long history of stripping citizenship away from both naturalized immigrants and native-born citizens. Tracing this history from the nation's beginnings through the War on Terror, Herzog locates the sociological, political, legal, and historic meanings of revoking citizenship. Why, when, and with what justification do states take away citizenship from their subjects? Using the history and policies of revoking citizenship as a lens, the book examines, describes, and analyzes the complex relationships between citizenship, immigration, and national identity." --
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The Slavery Quarrel and the American Civil War

Author: Donald J. Meyers

Publisher: Algora Publishing

ISBN: 0875863590

Category: History

Page: 284

View: 9433

"This detailed account of slavery in America, from Jamestown through the Civil War, explains its economic importance in the North as well as the South, its impact on the political dynamics of the Civil War, and the moral dilemmas it posed"--Provided by publisher.
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Author: Gabor S. Boritt,David W. Blight

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN: 0195113764

Category: History

Page: 253

View: 8348

Essays examine the causes of the Civil War, discussing pivotal events, people, and institutions
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Author: Ollie A. Johnson,Karin L. Stanford

Publisher: Rutgers University Press

ISBN: 9780813531403

Category: Political Science

Page: 264

View: 4694

The first volume to investigate the accountability and relevance of African American political organizations since the end of the modern Civil Rights Movement in 1968
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The Civil War Era

Author: James M. McPherson

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780199743902

Category: History

Page: 952

View: 2237

Filled with fresh interpretations and information, puncturing old myths and challenging new ones, Battle Cry of Freedom will unquestionably become the standard one-volume history of the Civil War. James McPherson's fast-paced narrative fully integrates the political, social, and military events that crowded the two decades from the outbreak of one war in Mexico to the ending of another at Appomattox. Packed with drama and analytical insight, the book vividly recounts the momentous episodes that preceded the Civil War--the Dred Scott decision, the Lincoln-Douglas debates, John Brown's raid on Harper's Ferry--and then moves into a masterful chronicle of the war itself--the battles, the strategic maneuvering on both sides, the politics, and the personalities. Particularly notable are McPherson's new views on such matters as the slavery expansion issue in the 1850s, the origins of the Republican Party, the causes of secession, internal dissent and anti-war opposition in the North and the South, and the reasons for the Union's victory. The book's title refers to the sentiments that informed both the Northern and Southern views of the conflict: the South seceded in the name of that freedom of self-determination and self-government for which their fathers had fought in 1776, while the North stood fast in defense of the Union founded by those fathers as the bulwark of American liberty. Eventually, the North had to grapple with the underlying cause of the war--slavery--and adopt a policy of emancipation as a second war aim. This "new birth of freedom," as Lincoln called it, constitutes the proudest legacy of America's bloodiest conflict. This authoritative volume makes sense of that vast and confusing "second American Revolution" we call the Civil War, a war that transformed a nation and expanded our heritage of liberty.
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a critical history of the distinction between combatant and civilian

Author: Helen M. Kinsella

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN: 9780801461262

Category: Political Science

Page: 272

View: 4155

Since at least the Middle Ages, the laws of war have distinguished between combatants and civilians under an injunction now formally known as the principle of distinction. The principle of distinction is invoked in contemporary conflicts as if there were an unmistakable and sure distinction to be made between combatant and civilian. As is so brutally evident in armed conflicts, it is precisely the distinction between civilian and combatant, upon which the protection of civilians is founded, cannot be taken as self-evident or stable. Helen M. Kinsella documents that the history of international humanitarian law itself admits the difficulty of such a distinction. In The Image Before the Weapon, Kinsella explores the evolution of the concept of the civilian and how it has been applied in warfare. A series of discourses-including gender, innocence, and civilization- have shaped the legal, military, and historical understandings of the civilian and she documents how these discourses converge at particular junctures to demarcate the difference between civilian and combatant. Engaging with works on the law of war from the earliest thinkers in the Western tradition, including St. Thomas Aquinas and Christine de Pisan, to contemporary figures such as James Turner Johnson and Michael Walzer, Kinsella identifies the foundational ambiguities and inconsistencies in the principle of distinction, as well as the significant role played by Christian concepts of mercy and charity. She then turns to the definition and treatment of civilians in specific armed conflicts: the American Civil War and the U.S.-Indian Wars of the nineteenth century, and the civil wars of Guatemala and El Salvador in the 1980s. Finally, she analyzes the two modern treaties most influential for the principle of distinction: the 1949 IV Geneva Convention Relative to the Protection of Civilian Persons in Times of War and the 1977 Protocols Additional to the 1949 Conventions, which for the first time formally defined the civilian within international law. She shows how the experiences of the two world wars, but particularly World War II, and the Algerian war of independence affected these subsequent codifications of the laws of war. As recognition grows that compliance with the principle of distinction to limit violence against civilians depends on a firmer grasp of its legal, political, and historical evolution, The Image before the Weapon is a timely intervention in debates about how best to protect civilian populations.
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Author: William Barney

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 0470998466

Category: History

Page: 432

View: 7385

A Companion to 19th-Century America is an authoritative overview of current historiographical developments and major themes in the history of nineteenth-century America. Twenty-seven scholars, all specialists in their own thematic areas, examine the key debates and historiography. A thematic and chronological organization brings together the major time periods, politics, the Civil War, economy, and social and cultural history of the nineteenth century. Written with the general reader in mind, each essay surveys the historical research, the emerging concerns, and assesses the future direction of scholarship. Complete coverage of all the major themes and current debates in nineteenth-century US history assessing the state of the scholarship and future concerns. 24 original essays by leading experts in nineteenth-century American history complete with up-to-date bibliographies. Chronological and thematic organization covers both traditional and contemporary fields of research - politics, periods, economy, class formation, ethnicity, gender roles, regions, culture and ideas.
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