A Sourcebook

Author: Dr Barbara Levick,Barbara Levick

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134572638

Category: History

Page: 312

View: 6005

This book reveals how an empire that stretched from Glasgow to Aswan in Egypt could be ruled from a single city and still survive more than a thousand years. The Government of the Roman Empire is the only sourcebook to concentrate on the administration of the empire, using the evidence of contemporary writers and historians. Specifically designed for students, with extensive cross-referencing, bibliographies and introductions and explanations for each item, this new edition brings the book right up-to-date, and makes it the ideal resource for students of the subject.
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Author: K. Loewenstein

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 9789024714582

Category: History

Page: 502

View: 743

Next to the Bible, Shakespeare, the French revolution and Napoleon, ancient Rome is one of the most plowed-through fields of historical experience. One of the truly great periods of history, Rome, over the centuries, deservedly has attracted the passionate attention of historians, philologists and, more recently, archeologists. Since Roman law constituted the source of the legal life of most of Western Europe, the legal profession had a legitimate interest. Veritable libraries have been built around the history of Rome. In the past confmed mostly to Italian, German, and French scholars the fascination with things Roman by now has spread to other civilized nations in cluding the Anglo-Saxon. Among the contributors to our knowledge of ancient Rome are some of the great minds in history and law. Our bibliography - selective, as neces sarily it has to be - records outstanding generalists as well as some of the numerous specialists that were helpful for our undertaking. Why, then, another study of the Roman political civilization and one that, at least measured by volume and effort, is not altogether insubstantial? And why, has to be added, one presented by an author who, whatever his reputation in other fields, ostensibly is an outsider of the classical discipline? These are legitimate questions that should be honestly answered. By training and avocation the author is a constitutional lawyer or, rather, a political scientist primarily interested in the operation of governmental institutions.
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Die tausendjährige Geschichte Roms

Author: Mary Beard

Publisher: S. Fischer Verlag

ISBN: 3104031444

Category: History

Page: 656

View: 1783

Wer hätte gedacht, dass Alte Geschichte so spannend und gegenwärtig sein kann? – Ein neuer Blick auf das alte Rom! Unkonventionell, scharfsinnig und zugleich akademisch versiert – dies trifft nicht nur auf die hochrenommierte Althistorikerin und Cambridge-Professorin Mary Beard selbst zu, sondern auch auf ihre neue große Geschichte des Römischen Reichs und seiner Bewohner: SPQR - Die tausendjährige Geschichte Roms. Begeistert erzählt sie die Geschichte eines Weltreichs, lässt uns Kriege, Exzesse, Intrigen miterleben, aber auch den römischen Alltag – wie Ärger in den Mietshäusern und Ciceros Scheidung. Sie lässt uns hinter die Legenden und Mythen blicken, hinterfragt sicher Geglaubtes und kommt zu überraschenden Einsichten. So erscheint Rom ganz nah – in seinen Debatten über Integration und Migration – und dann doch auch faszinierend fern, wenn es etwa um Sklaverei geht. Die Geschichte Roms für unsere Zeit. In prächtiger Ausstattung, mit über hundert s/w Abbildungen und umfangreichem farbigen Bildteil. »Bahnbrechend [...], anregend [...], revolutionär [...] ein völlig neuer Zugang zur Alten Geschichte.« Spectator »Aufregend, psychologisch scharfsinnig sowie mitfühlend kritisch.« Sunday Times »Meisterhaft [...], diese große Geschichte Roms erweckt die ferne Vergangenheit grandios zum Leben.« The Economist »Ungemein packend [...] ebenso unterhaltsam wie gelehrt.« Observer »Wer hätte gedacht, dass Geschichte so spannend sein kann?« Independent
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Lateinisch - Deutsch

Author: Cicero

Publisher: Walter de Gruyter

ISBN: 3050061618

Category: History

Page: 1076

View: 3695

An seine Freunde - wer da Zeugnisse dessen, was wir Freundschaft nennen, erwartet, wird sich ein wenig enttäuscht finden. Abgesehen von den Briefen an seine Gattin Terentia und seine Freigelassenen Tiro, die eine Sonderstellung einnehmen, gibt sich Cicero nur einigen wenigen Partnern gegenüber ganz so, wie er ist, und das ist doch das, was wir bei einem Freund voraussetzen: Unbefangenheit und Unverstelltheit. Die große Masse seiner Briefe ist zweckgebunden, trägt mehr oder weniger formellen Charakter. Da gilt es, das eigene politische Handeln zu rechtfertigen, das persönliche Verdienst ins rechte Licht zu rücken, Differenzen mit politischen "Freunden" auszufechten, Beziehungen für sich und andere auszuwerten, den politischen Gesinnungsgenossen bei der Stange zu halten oder zu fördern und was dergleichen mehr ist. So leuchten diese Briefe tief hinein in das Treiben der führenden Kreise und bergen mit ihren Schlaglichtern auf das politische Geschehen der Zeit eine Fülle von Interessantem und Fesselndem. Ganz von der Politik diktiert ist der Briefwechsel mit L. Plancus, M. Lepidus, D. Brutus und C. Cassius in den Büchern X, XI und XII. Er bildet eine unschätzbare Quelle für unsere Kenntnis der Vorgänge während des Todeskampfes der Republik.
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Author: Rita J. Markel

Publisher: Twenty-First Century Books

ISBN: 1467703788

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 139

View: 2501

Can the demise of a government 1,500 years ago have repercussions felt around the globe centuries later? If that government is the powerful Roman Empire, it can. From first century B.C. through fifth century A.D., the Romans ruled over an empire that stretched across much of Europe, the Middle East, and North Africa. Then in 476, a leader from a Germanic group called the Goths overthrew the Roman Emperor. To this day, questions still exist about how such a powerful empire could have been destroyed. Roman culture, language, and technology had great influence on all areas under the empire's control. After the fall, Europe entered the early Middle Ages, a period of fragmentation characterized by a decline in trade, learning, and artistic achievement. The rise—and fall—of the Roman Empire are one of world history's most pivotal moments.
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Author: Fergus Millar,Hannah Cotton,Guy MacLean Rogers

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

ISBN: 9780807855201

Category: History

Page: 470

View: 2019

This second volume in the three-volume series includes essays by Fergus Millar which explore the role of the emperor and the functions of the Roman Empire's treasury, courts, penal system, and equestrian civil service in the first three centuries A.D. Other essays deal with the Roman citizenry, paying particular attention to the cultural exchange between Rome and Greece.
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Author: David Shotter

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134364393

Category: History

Page: 136

View: 6212

Revised and updated to include the latest research in the field, this second edition of a popular history text examines how the Roman republic was destabilized by the unplanned growth of the Roman Empire. Central discussion points include: the government of the republic how certain individuals took advantage of the expansion of the empire Julius Caesar's accession to power the rise of the Augustan principate following Julius Caesar's murder. Drawing on a wealth of recent scholarship and including an expanded and updated guide to further reading, a chronology, and a guide to the provinces of the Roman Empire, students of history and classical studies will find this a helpful and accessible introduction to this complex period in history.
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Author: Richard Duncan-Jones

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521648295

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 300

View: 5452

Rome's conquests gave her access to the accumulated metal resources of most of the known world. An abundant gold and silver coinage circulated within her empire as a result. But coinage changes later suggest difficulty in maintaining metal supplies. By studying Roman coin-survivals in a wider context, Dr Duncan-Jones uncovers important facts about the origin of coin hoards of the Principate. He constructs a new profile of minting, financial policy and monetary circulation, by analysing extensive coin evidence collected for the first time. His findings considerably advance our knowledge of crucial areas of the Roman economy.
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Background Texts

Author: Ralph Martin Novak

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing USA

ISBN: 0567018407

Category: Religion

Page: 352

View: 6866

The rise of Christianity during the first four centuries of the common era was the pivotal development in Western history and profoundly influenced the later direction of all world history. Yet, for all that has been written on early Christian history, the primary sources for this history are widely scattered, difficult to find, and generally unknown to lay persons and to historians not specially trained in the field. In Christianity and the Roman Empire Ralph Novak interweaves these primary sources with a narrative text and constructs a single continuous account of these crucial centuries. The primary sources are selected to emphasize the manner in which the government and the people of the Roman Empire perceived Christians socially and politically; the ways in which these perceptions influenced the treatment of Christians within the Roman Empire; and the manner in which Christians established their political and religious dominance of the Roman Empire after Constantine the Great came to power in the early fourth century CE. Ralph Martin Novak holds a Masters Degree in Roman History from the University of Chicago. For: Undergraduates; seminarians; general audiences
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Author: Christopher Kelly,Professor Christopher Kelly

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 9780674015647

Category: History

Page: 341

View: 6131

In this highly original work, Christopher Kelly paints a remarkable picture of running a superstate. He portrays a complex system of government openly regulated by networks of personal influence and the payment of money. Focusing on the Roman Empire after Constantine's conversion to Christianity, Kelly illuminates a period of increasingly centralized rule through an ever more extensive and intrusive bureaucracy. The book opens with a view of its times through the eyes of a high-ranking official in sixth-century Constantinople, John Lydus. His On the Magistracies of the Roman State, the only memoir of its kind to come down to us, gives an impassioned and revealing account of his career and the system in which he worked. Kelly draws a wealth of insight from this singular memoir and goes on to trace the operation of power and influence, exposing how these might be successfully deployed or skillfully diverted by those wishing either to avoid government regulation or to subvert it for their own ends. Ruling the Later Roman Empire presents a fascinating procession of officials, emperors, and local power brokers, winners and losers, mapping their experiences, their conflicting loyalties, their successes, and their failures. This important book elegantly recaptures the experience of both rulers and ruled under a sophisticated and highly successful system of government.
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The Art of Government in the Roman World

Author: J. E. Lendon

Publisher: Clarendon Press

ISBN: 9780199247639

Category: Political Science

Page: 320

View: 4677

J. E. Lendon offers a new interpretation of how the Roman empire worked in the first four centuries AD. A despotism rooted in force and fear enjoyed widespread support among the ruling classes of the provinces on the basis of an aristocratic culture of honour shared by rulers and ruled. The competitive Roman and Greek aristocrats of the empire conceived of their relative standing in terms of public esteem or honour, and conceived of their cities - towards which they felt a warm patriotism- as entities locked in a parallel struggle for primacy in honour over rivals. Emperors and provincial governors exploited these rivalries to gain the indispensable co-operation of local magnates by granting honours to individuals and their cities. Since rulers strove for honour as well, their subjects manipulated them with honours in their turn. Honour - whose workings are also traced in the Roman army - served as a way of talking and thinking about Roman government: it was both a species ofpower, and a way - connived in by rulers and ruled - of concealing the terrible realities of imperial rule.
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Economy, Society and Culture

Author: Peter Garnsey,Richard Saller

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520285980

Category: HISTORY

Page: 328

View: 1176

During the Principate (roughly 27 BCE to 235 CE), when the empire reached its maximum extent, Roman society and culture were radically transformed. But how was the vast territory of the empire controlled? Did the demands of central government stimulate economic growth or endanger survival? What forces of cohesion operated to balance the social and economic inequalities and high mortality rates? How did the official religion react in the face of the diffusion of alien cults and the emergence of Christianity? These are some of the many questions posed here, in the new, expanded edition of Garnsey and Saller's pathbreaking account of the economy, society, and culture of the Roman Empire. This second edition includes a new introduction that explores the consequences for government and the governing classes of the replacement of the Republic by the rule of emperors. Addenda to the original chapters offer up-to-date discussions of issues and point to new evidence and approaches that have enlivened the study of Roman history in recent decades. A completely new chapter assesses how far Rome’s subjects resisted her hegemony. The bibliography has also been thoroughly updated, and a new color plate section has been added.
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Imperial Pronouncements and Government, AD 284-324

Author: Simon Corcoran

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780198153047

Category: History

Page: 421

View: 7446

Simon Corcoran examines the government of the Roman empire at an important period of administrative and religious change. Drawing together material from a wide variety of sources, the book studies the vast range of documents issued by the emperors and their officials, and assesses how effectively the machinery of government matched imperial ambitions. The additional notes in this revised edition of the hardback contain details of recent epigraphic work and discoveries, especially from Ephesus, as well as an account of a long ignored rescript of Diocletian.
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Author: Werner Eck

Publisher: C.H.Beck

ISBN: 3406666876

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 128

View: 3868

Am Tag, an dem Augustus bestattet wurde, kamen alle öffentlichen und privaten Geschäfte zum Stillstand. Ganz Rom und Hunderttausende von Menschen aus ganz Italien beteiligten sich an den Trauerfeierlichkeiten. Die Leiche wurde auf einem Prunkbett auf den Scheiterhaufen gesetzt. Darüber ruhte, für alle sichtbar, ein aus Wachs gefertigtes Abbild des Toten. Als das Feuer aufloderte, stieg ein Adler in den Himmel – ein Zeichen dafür, daß der Verstorbene zu den Göttern erhoben worden war. Ein Senator bestätigte später unter Eid, er habe die Seele des Verstorbenen zu den Göttern auffahren sehen. Livia, Augustus’ Witwe, belohnte den Zeugen mit einer Million Sesterzen. Wer war dieser Mensch, der damals unter die Götter aufgenommen worden sein soll? Ein Willkürherrscher? Ein Friedensfürst? Ein Neugestalter von Staat, Heer, Gesellschaft und Kultus, kurzum – der Neugestalter der römischen Welt? Werner Eck bietet in seiner fesselnden Biographie Antworten auf diese und viele weitere Fragen zur Machtpolitik des Augustus.
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Author: Andrew William Lintott

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN: 9780198152828

Category: History

Page: 240

View: 5846

This book examines the roots of violence in Roman Republican law and society and the growth of violence in city war and the power of armies. It discusses political conflict, violence, military insurrection, and authoritarian government of the Republic.
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Author: Andrew Lintott

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 9780191584671

Category: History

Page: 310

View: 4168

There is no other published book in English studying the constitution of the Roman Republic as a whole. Yet the Greek historian Polybius believed that the constitution was a fundamental cause of the exponential growth of Rome's empire. He regarded the Republic as unusual in two respects: first, because it functioned so well despite being a mix of monarchy, oligarchy and democracy; secondly, because the constitution was the product of natural evolution rather than the ideals of a lawgiver. Even if historians now seek more widely for the causes of Rome's rise to power, the importance and influence of her political institutions remains. The reasons for Rome's power are both complex, on account of the mix of elements, and flexible, inasmuch as they were not founded on written statutes but on unwritten traditions reinterpreted by successive generations. Knowledge of Rome's political institutions is essential both for ancient historians and for those who study the contribution of Rome to the republican tradition of political thought from the Middle Ages to the revolutions inspired by the Enlightenment.
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