A Social Economic and Administrative Survey

Author: Arnold Hugh Martin Jones

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN: 9780801833533

Category: History

Page: 1518

View: 9238

The book presents a narrative account of Roman political, military, and religious history from 284 to 602.
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Author: David Morton Gwynn

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9004163832

Category: History

Page: 281

View: 4011

This volume offers a reassessment of the life and scholarship of A.H.M. Jones and of the impact and legacy of his great work "The Later Roman Empire 284a "602: A Social, Economic, and Administrative Survey (1964)."
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Author: A.H.M. Jones

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317873041

Category: History

Page: 422

View: 2446

This celebrated account of the decline of the ancient world describes the fall of the Roman Empire and the beginning of the emergence of the new medieval European order.
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Author: Stephen Mitchell

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 1118341066

Category: History

Page: 568

View: 9782

The Second Edition of A History of the Later Roman Empire features extensive revisions and updates to the highly-acclaimed, sweeping historical survey of the Roman Empire from the accession of Diocletian in AD 284 to the death of Heraclius in 641. Features a revised narrative of the political history that shaped the late Roman Empire Includes extensive changes to the chapters on regional history, especially those relating to Asia Minor and Egypt Offers a renewed evaluation of the decline of the empire in the later sixth and seventh centuries Places a larger emphasis on the military deficiencies, collapse of state finances, and role of bubonic plague throughout the Europe in Rome’s decline Includes systematic updates to the bibliography
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Author: Jonathan J. Arnold

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107054400

Category: History

Page: 354

View: 1994

Theoderic and the Roman Imperial Restoration offers a new interpretation of the fall of Rome and the "barbarian" successor state known as Ostrogothic Italy. Relying primarily on Italian textual and material evidence, Jonathan J. Arnold demonstrates that the subjects of the Ostrogothic kingdom viewed it as a revived Roman Empire and its king, Theoderic, as its emperor. Most accounts of Roman history end with the fall of Rome in 476 or see the Ostrogothic kingdom as a barbarous imitator. This book, however, challenges such views, placing the Theoderican epoch firmly within the continuum of Roman history.
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Author: Arnold Hugh Martin Jones

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 196

View: 9929

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And the End of Civilization

Author: Bryan Ward-Perkins

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 0191622362

Category: History

Page: 256

View: 2349

Why did Rome fall? Vicious barbarian invasions during the fifth century resulted in the cataclysmic end of the world's most powerful civilization, and a 'dark age' for its conquered peoples. Or did it? The dominant view of this period today is that the 'fall of Rome' was a largely peaceful transition to Germanic rule, and the start of a positive cultural transformation. Bryan Ward-Perkins encourages every reader to think again by reclaiming the drama and violence of the last days of the Roman world, and reminding us of the very real horrors of barbarian occupation. Attacking new sources with relish and making use of a range of contemporary archaeological evidence, he looks at both the wider explanations for the disintegration of the Roman world and also the consequences for the lives of everyday Romans, in a world of economic collapse, marauding barbarians, and the rise of a new religious orthodoxy. He also looks at how and why successive generations have understood this period differently, and why the story is still so significant today.
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The Survival of the East in the Fifth Century

Author: Gerard Friell,Stephen Williams

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134735456

Category: History

Page: 293

View: 8420

The Rome that Did Not Fall provides a well-illustrated, comprehensive narrative and analysis of the Roman empire in the east, charting its remarkable growth and development which resulted in the distinct and enduring civilization of Byzantium. It considers: * the fourth century background * the invasions of Attila * the resources of the east * the struggle for stability * the achievements of Anastasius.
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Author: A. H. M. Jones,Elizabeth Monroe

Publisher: Simon Publications

ISBN: 9781931541626

Category: History

Page: 188

View: 9708

A short but comprehensive treatment of the history and religion of Ethiopia, formerly called Abyssinia, from the mysterious Queen of Sheba to the time just before Mussolini's attack. A well written, informative book.
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Author: Christopher KELLY,Christopher Kelly

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 0674039459

Category: History

Page: 352

View: 528

In this highly original work, Christopher Kelly paints a remarkable picture of running a superstate. He portrays a complex system of government openly regulated by networks of personal influence and the payment of money. Focusing on the Roman Empire after Constantine's conversion to Christianity, Kelly illuminates a period of increasingly centralized rule through an ever more extensive and intrusive bureaucracy. The book opens with a view of its times through the eyes of a high-ranking official in sixth-century Constantinople, John Lydus. His On the Magistracies of the Roman State, the only memoir of its kind to come down to us, gives an impassioned and revealing account of his career and the system in which he worked. Kelly draws a wealth of insight from this singular memoir and goes on to trace the operation of power and influence, exposing how these might be successfully deployed or skillfully diverted by those wishing either to avoid government regulation or to subvert it for their own ends. Ruling the Later Roman Empire presents a fascinating procession of officials, emperors, and local power brokers, winners and losers, mapping their experiences, their conflicting loyalties, their successes, and their failures. This important book elegantly recaptures the experience of both rulers and ruled under a sophisticated and highly successful system of government.
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Author: Michael Maas

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1139826875

Category: History

Page: N.A

View: 7741

This book introduces the Age of Justinian, the last Roman century and the first flowering of Byzantine culture. Dominated by the policies and personality of emperor Justinian I (527–565), this period of grand achievements and far-reaching failures witnessed the transformation of the Mediterranean world. In this volume, twenty specialists explore the most important aspects of the age including the mechanics and theory of empire, warfare, urbanism, and economy. It also discusses the impact of the great plague, the codification of Roman law, and the many religious upheavals taking place at the time. Consideration is given to imperial relations with the papacy, northern barbarians, the Persians, and other eastern peoples, shedding new light on a dramatic and highly significant historical period.
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Author: Philip Rousseau

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 1118293479

Category: History

Page: 736

View: 4115

An accessible and authoritative overview capturing the vitality and diversity of scholarship that exists on the transformative time period known as late antiquity. Provides an essential overview of current scholarship on late antiquity – from between the accession of Diocletian in AD 284 and the end of Roman rule in the Mediterranean Comprises 39 essays from some of the world's foremost scholars of the era Presents this once-neglected period as an age of powerful transformation that shaped the modern world Emphasizes the central importance of religion and its connection with economic, social, and political life Winner of the 2009 Single Volume Reference/Humanities & Social Sciences PROSE award granted by the Association of American Publishers
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Romulus Augustulus and the Decline of the West

Author: Adrian Murdoch

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780750944748

Category: Emperors

Page: 190

View: 5079

"The Last Roman" is the only biography about Romulus Augustulus. It focuses on the personalities behind this powerful story and reveals the world into which Romulus was born - an empire that was about to die. Author Adrian Murdoch explores how Romulus's father Orestes, secretary to Attila the Hun, rose through the ranks to become kingmaker; how all was lost to another usurper in an Italy wracked with civil war; and how Romulus found peace at last, founding a monastery. This dramatic and poignant story of politics, decline and loss has inspired. Drawing on extensive new archaeological and historical research and using numerous contemporary sources, many translated for the first time since the nineteenth century, "The Last Roman" is the vivid story of an empire breathing its last.
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Barbarian Popes and Imperial Pretenders

Author: Peter J. Heather

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 0199368511

Category: History

Page: 470

View: 9022

In 476 AD, the last of Rome's emperors, known as "Augustulus," was deposed by a barbarian general, the son of one of Attila the Hun's henchmen. With the imperial vestments dispatched to Constantinople, the curtain fell on the Roman empire in Western Europe, its territories divided among successor kingdoms constructed around barbarian military manpower. But, if the Roman Empire was dead, Romans across much of the old empire still lived, holding on to their lands, their values, and their institutions. The conquering barbarians, responding toRome's continuing psychological dominance and the practical value of many of its institutions, were ready to reignite the imperial flame and enjoy the benefits. As Peter Heather shows in dazzling biographical portraits, each of the three greatest immediate contenders for imperial power--Theoderic, Justinian, and Charlemagne--operated with a different power base but was astonishingly successful in his own way. Though each in turn managed to put back together enough of the old Roman West to stake a plausible claim to the Western imperial title, none of their empires long outlived their founders' deaths. Not until the reinvention of the papacy in the eleventh century would Europe's barbarians find the means to establish a new kind of Roman Empire, one that has lasted a thousand years. A sequel to the bestselling Fall of the Roman Empire, The Restoration of Rome offers a captivating narrative of the death of an era and the birth of the Catholic Church.
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The Development of Christian Discourse

Author: Averil Cameron

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520089235

Category: History

Page: 261

View: 895

Many reasons can be given for the rise of Christianity in late antiquity and its flourishing in the medieval world. In asking how Christianity succeeded in becoming the dominant ideology in the unpromising circumstances of the Roman Empire, Averil Cameron turns to the development of Christian discourse over the first to sixth centuries A.D., investigating the discourse's essential characteristics, its effects on existing forms of communication, and its eventual preeminence. Scholars of late antiquity and general readers interested in this crucial historical period will be intrigued by her exploration of these influential changes in modes of communication. The emphasis that Christians placed on language—writing, talking, and preaching—made possible the formation of a powerful and indeed a totalizing discourse, argues the author. Christian discourse was sufficiently flexible to be used as a public and political instrument, yet at the same time to be used to express private feelings and emotion. Embracing the two opposing poles of logic and mystery, it contributed powerfully to the gradual acceptance of Christianity and the faith's transformation from the enthusiasm of a small sect to an institutionalized world religion.
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Author: A. H. Jones

Publisher: Read Books Ltd

ISBN: 1446547051

Category: History

Page: 284

View: 3725

Constantine the Great was Roman Emperor from 306 to 337 AD. As emperor, Constantine enacted many administrative, financial, social, and military reforms to strengthen the empire. The government was restructured and civil and military authority separated. A new gold coin, the solidus, was introduced to combat inflation. It would become the standard for Byzantine and European currencies for more than a thousand years.
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Author: Daniëlle Slootjes

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9047409345

Category: History

Page: 232

View: 9126

This book presents new insights into the relationship between governors and provincial subjects in the Later Roman Empire. Discussion of provincial expectations and perception, the continuous dialogue, interdependence and reciprocity leads to a better understanding of Late Roman provincial administration.
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Author: Andrew Gillett

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781139440035

Category: History

Page: N.A

View: 7411

Warfare and dislocation are obvious features of the break-up of the late Roman West, but this crucial period of change was characterized also by communication and diplomacy. The great events of the late antique West were determined by the quieter labours of countless envoys, who travelled between emperors, kings, generals, high officials, bishops, provincial councils, and cities. This book examines the role of envoys in the period from the establishment of the first 'barbarian kingdoms' in the West, to the eve of Justinian's wars of re-conquest. It shows how ongoing practices of Roman imperial administration shaped new patterns of political interaction in the novel context of the earliest medieval states. Close analysis of sources with special interest in embassies offers insight into a variety of genres: chronicles, panegyrics, hagiographies, letters and epitaph. This study makes a significant contribution to the developing field of ancient and medieval communications.
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Author: A. H. M. Jones

Publisher: Wipf and Stock Publishers

ISBN: 1592447481

Category: History

Page: 591

View: 8323

This book traces the diffusion of the Greek city as a political institution throughout the lands of the Roman Empire bordering the Eastern Mediterranean over a period extending from Alexander's conquest of the East to the sixth century. Arranged in order of annexation, the regions are dealt with individually. The study examines to what extent native institutions were capable of being adapted to the Greek conception of the city, the activities of Hellenistic kings in founding cities, and the spontaneous diffusion of Greek political institutions in the Hellenization of the East. Professor Jones describes the restrictive effect of centralized administrative policy on some dynasties and the growth of cities in their dominions, and various aspects of the relations between cities and central government, including the cities' role in the economic life of the Empire. Other topics discussed include the local responsibilities of cities, administrative duties such as collecting taxes and levying recruits, the internal and political life of the cities, and their economic effect on the surrounding countryside.
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