The Hidden History of Women in Science

Author: Des Julie

Publisher: The Feminist Press at CUNY

ISBN: 9781558616554

Category: Science

Page: 320

View: 6528

The real-life stories behind the gendering of science.
Read More

Author: Londa Schiebinger

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 9780674005440

Category: Science

Page: 252

View: 6383

"Has Feminism Changed Science?" is a history of women in science and a frank assessment of the role of gender in shaping scientific knowledge. Londa Schiebinger first considers the lives of women scientists, past and present: How many are there? What sciences do they choose--or have chosen for them? Is there something uniquely feminine about the science women do? Schiebinger debunks the myth that women scientists--because they are women--are somehow more holistic and integrative and create more cooperative scientific communities.
Read More

Author: Cynthia Eagle RUSSETT

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 0674043022

Category: History

Page: 256

View: 7548

Read More

Women in Science, 1789-1979

Author: Pnina G. Abir-Am,Dorinda Outram

Publisher: Rutgers University Press

ISBN: 9780813512563

Category: Science

Page: 365

View: 4644

.
Read More

Why Science Is Still a Boys' Club

Author: Eileen Pollack

Publisher: Beacon Press

ISBN: 0807046612

Category: Social Science

Page: 288

View: 1019

A bracingly honest exploration of why there are still so few women in the hard sciences, mathematics, engineering, and computer science In 2005, when Lawrence Summers, then president of Harvard, asked why so few women, even today, achieve tenured positions in the hard sciences, Eileen Pollack set out to find the answer. A successful fiction writer, Pollack had grown up in the 1960s and ’70s dreaming of a career as a theoretical astrophysicist. Denied the chance to take advanced courses in science and math, she nonetheless made her way to Yale. There, despite finding herself far behind the men in her classes, she went on to graduate summa cum laude, with honors, as one of the university’s first two women to earn a bachelor of science degree in physics. And yet, isolated, lacking in confidence, starved for encouragement, she abandoned her ambition to become a physicist. Years later, spurred by the suggestion that innate differences in scientific and mathematical aptitude might account for the dearth of tenured female faculty at Summer’s institution, Pollack thought back on her own experiences and wondered what, if anything, had changed in the intervening decades. Based on six years interviewing her former teachers and classmates, as well as dozens of other women who had dropped out before completing their degrees in science or found their careers less rewarding than they had hoped, The Only Woman in the Room is a bracingly honest, no-holds-barred examination of the social, interpersonal, and institutional barriers confronting women—and minorities—in the STEM fields. This frankly personal and informed book reflects on women’s experiences in a way that simple data can’t, documenting not only the more blatant bias of another era but all the subtle disincentives women in the sciences still face. The Only Woman in the Room shows us the struggles women in the sciences have been hesitant to admit, and provides hope for changing attitudes and behaviors in ways that could bring far more women into fields in which even today they remain seriously underrepresented. Named one of the notable nonfiction books of 2015 by The Washington Post From the Hardcover edition.
Read More

Forging a New World Since 1972

Author: Margaret W. Rossiter

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN: 1421402335

Category: Education

Page: 426

View: 9317

The third volume of Margaret W. Rossiter’s landmark survey of the history of American women scientists focuses on their pioneering efforts and contributions from 1972 to the present. Central to this story are the struggles and successes of women scientists in the era of affirmative action. Scores of previously isolated women scientists were suddenly energized to do things they had rarely, if ever, done before—form organizations and recruit new members, start rosters and projects, put out newsletters, confront authorities, and even fight (and win) lawsuits. Rossiter follows the major activities of these groups in several fields—from engineering to the physical, biological, and social sciences—and their campaigns to raise consciousness, see legislation enforced, lobby for passage of the Equal Rights Amendment, and serve as watchdogs of the media. This comprehensive volume also covers the changing employment circumstances in the federal government, academia, industry, and the nonprofit sector and discusses contemporary battles to increase the number of women members of the National Academy of Science and women presidents of scientific societies. In writing this book, Rossiter mined nearly one hundred previously unexamined archival collections and more than fifty oral histories. With the thoroughness and resourcefulness that characterize the earlier volumes, she recounts the rich history of the courageous and resolute women determined to realize their scientific ambitions.
Read More

Redefining Domesticity

Author: Julie Des Jardins

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN: 0813347645

Category: History

Page: 192

View: 7383

Lillian Gilbreth is a stunning example of female ingenuity in the early twentieth century. At a time when women were standard fixtures in the home and barely accepted in many professions, Gilbreth excelled in both spheres, concurrently winning honors as “Engineer of the Year” and “Mother of the Year.” This accessible, engaging introduction to the life of Lillian Gilbreth examines her pivotal role in establishing the discipline of industrial psychology, her work as an engineer of domestic management and home economics, and her role as mother of twelve children—made famous by the book, and later movie, Cheaper by the Dozen. This book examines the life of an exceptional woman who was able to negotiate the divide between the public and domestic spheres and define it on her terms. About the Lives of American Women series: Selected and edited by renowned women's historian Carol Berkin, these brief biographies are designed for use in undergraduate courses. Rather than a comprehensive approach, each biography focuses instead on a particular aspect of a women's life that is emblematic of her time, or which made her a pivotal figure in the era. The emphasis is on a “good read,” featuring accessible writing and compelling narratives, without sacrificing sound scholarship and academic integrity. Primary sources at the end of each biography reveal the subject's perspective in her own words. Study questions and an annotated bibliography support the student reader.
Read More

52 Women Who Changed Science-and the World

Author: Rachel Swaby

Publisher: Broadway Books

ISBN: 0553446800

Category: Science

Page: 288

View: 5259

Fifty-two inspiring and insightful profiles of history’s brightest female scientists. In 2013, the New York Times published an obituary for Yvonne Brill. It began: “She made a mean beef stroganoff, followed her husband from job to job, and took eight years off from work to raise three children.” It wasn’t until the second paragraph that readers discovered why the Times had devoted several hundred words to her life: Brill was a brilliant rocket scientist who invented a propulsion system to keep communications satellites in orbit, and had recently been awarded the National Medal of Technology and Innovation. Among the questions the obituary—and consequent outcry—prompted were, Who are the role models for today’s female scientists, and where can we find the stories that cast them in their true light? Headstrong delivers a powerful, global, and engaging response. Covering Nobel Prize winners and major innovators, as well as lesser-known but hugely significant scientists who influence our every day, Rachel Swaby’s vibrant profiles span centuries of courageous thinkers and illustrate how each one’s ideas developed, from their first moment of scientific engagement through the research and discovery for which they’re best known. This fascinating tour reveals these 52 women at their best—while encouraging and inspiring a new generation of girls to put on their lab coats. From the Trade Paperback edition.
Read More

Mother of Modern Physics

Author: Janice Borzendowski

Publisher: Sterling Publishing Company, Inc.

ISBN: 9781402753183

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 124

View: 6531

A biography of the scientist and Nobel Prize winner Marie Curie explores both Curie's personal and professional life.
Read More

Toward a Positive Psychology of Self-esteem

Author: Christopher J. Mruk

Publisher: Springer Publishing Company

ISBN: 9780826103147

Category: Psychology

Page: 294

View: 2469

In addition to the sound research findings, theory, and practice information that you have come to depend on with the past two editions, the third edition of Self-Esteem Research, Theory, and Practice brings with it much newly revised and updated information to reflect the changes in the field of self-esteem at large. New key features include: * New major theories of self-esteem * New chapter on the new positive psychology * 150 new references * Written in a clear, concise style.
Read More

Darwin, Science, and Women's Rights in Gilded Age America

Author: Kimberly A. Hamlin

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 022613475X

Category: Science

Page: 256

View: 8636

From Eve to Evolution provides the first full-length study of American women’s responses to evolutionary theory and illuminates the role science played in the nineteenth-century women’s rights movement. Kimberly A. Hamlin reveals how a number of nineteenth-century women, raised on the idea that Eve’s sin forever fixed women’s subordinate status, embraced Darwinian evolution—especially sexual selection theory as explained in The Descent of Man—as an alternative to the creation story in Genesis. Hamlin chronicles the lives and writings of the women who combined their enthusiasm for evolutionary science with their commitment to women’s rights, including Antoinette Brown Blackwell, Eliza Burt Gamble, Helen Hamilton Gardener, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, and Elizabeth Cady Stanton. These Darwinian feminists believed evolutionary science proved that women were not inferior to men, that it was natural for mothers to work outside the home, and that women should control reproduction. The practical applications of this evolutionary feminism came to fruition, Hamlin shows, in the early thinking and writing of the American birth control pioneer Margaret Sanger. Much scholarship has been dedicated to analyzing what Darwin and other male evolutionists had to say about women, but very little has been written regarding what women themselves had to say about evolution. From Eve to Evolution adds much-needed female voices to the vast literature on Darwin in America.
Read More

50 Fearless Pioneers who Changed the World

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 1607749769

Category: Young Adult Nonfiction

Page: 127

View: 9337

A charmingly illustrated gift book profiling 50 famous women scientists from the ancient Greek mathematician, philosopher, and astronomer, Hypatia, to Marie Curie, a physicist and chemist.
Read More

Their Lives, Struggles, and Momentous Discoveries, Second Edition

Author: Sharon Bertsch McGrayne

Publisher: Joseph Henry Press

ISBN: 0309072700

Category: Science

Page: 464

View: 2303

Since 1901 there have been over three hundred recipients of the Nobel Prize in the sciences. Only ten of them -- about 3 percent -- have been women. Why? In this updated version of Nobel Prize Women in Science, Sharon Bertsch McGrayne explores the reasons for this astonishing disparity by examining the lives and achievements of fifteen women scientists who either won a Nobel Prize or played a crucial role in a Nobel Prize - winning project. The book reveals the relentless discrimination these women faced both as students and as researchers. Their success was due to the fact that they were passionately in love with science. The book begins with Marie Curie, the first woman to win the Nobel Prize in physics. Readers are then introduced to Christiane Nusslein-Volhard, Emmy Noether, Lise Meitner, Barbara McClintock, Chien-Shiung Wu, and Rosalind Franklin. These and other remarkable women portrayed here struggled against gender discrimination, raised families, and became political and religious leaders. They were mountain climbers, musicians, seamstresses, and gourmet cooks. Above all, they were strong, joyful women in love with discovery. Nobel Prize Women in Science is a startling and revealing look into the history of science and the critical and inspiring role that women have played in the drama of scientific progress.
Read More

Women in Academic Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics

Author: Jill M. Bystydzienski,Sharon R. Bird

Publisher: Indiana University Press

ISBN: 9780253218179

Category: Science

Page: 347

View: 4129

Movement into academic science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields has been slow for women and minorities. Not only are women and minorities underrepresented in STEM careers, there is strong evidence that many academic departments are resistant to addressing the concerns that keep them from entering careers in these fields. In light of recent controversies surrounding these issues, this volume is particularly timely. As a whole, it shows positive examples of institutions and departments that have been transformed by the inclusion of women and recommends a set of best pra.
Read More

(Auto)Biography, Gender, and Genre

Author: Paola Govoni,Zelda Franceschi

Publisher: Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht

ISBN: 3847002635

Category: History

Page: 287

View: 6732

Following discussions on scientific biography carried out over the past few decades, this book proposes a kaleidoscopic survey of the uses of biography as a tool to understand science and its context. It offers food for thought on the role played by the gender of the biographer and the biographee in the process of writing. To provide orientation in such a challenging field, some of the authors have accepted to write about their own professional experience while reflecting on the case studies they have been working on. Focusing on (auto)biography may help us to build bridges between different approaches to men and women’s lives in science. The authors belong to a variety of academic and professional fields, including the history of science, anthropology, literary studies, and science journalism. The period covered spans from 1732, when Laura Bassi was the first woman to get a tenured professorship of physics, to 2009, when Elizabeth H. Blackburn and Carol W. Greider were the first women’s team to have won a Nobel Prize in science.
Read More

Author: Maryann Pasda DiEdwardo

Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing

ISBN: 1443848751

Category:

Page: 150

View: 4833

This volume studies processes of creating voices of the past to analyze and to juxtapose, discussing the nature of the educational community viewed through feminist theory to reveal hidden ideas surrounding stereotypes, gender status, and power in the postcolonial era. The contributions brought together here explore the various facets of language to focus on metaphorical grammatical constructions, unique and specific with form and function. They interpret various works to capture the essence of style, as well as rhetorical function of basic structure of grammar, diction and syntax, in a literary work as message and meaning. Furthermore, the book also discusses useful pedagogical and theoretical processes used by the literary scholar concerning the power of writing for cultural change. As such, the book will appeal to those who wish to heal through writing. The proceeds of the book support the authors’ local soup kitchen and crisis centers for domestic abuse.
Read More

Intellectual Property and Celebrity Culture in an Age of Information

Author: Eva Hemmungs Wirtén

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 022623584X

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 223

View: 2074

This unconventional biography of Marie Curie explores the emergence of the "Curie persona," the information culture of the period that shaped its development, and the strategies Curie herself used to manage and exploit her intellectual property.--Adapted from publisher description.
Read More

The Private Lives of Science's First Family

Author: Shelley Emling

Publisher: St. Martin's Press

ISBN: 1137102616

Category: Science

Page: 256

View: 1272

A new portrait of the two-time Nobel winner and her two daughters Focusing on the first family in science, this biography of Marie Curie plumbs the recesses of her relationships with her two daughters, extraordinary in their own right, and presents the legendary scientist to us in a fresh way. Although the common image is that of a shy introvert toiling away in her laboratory, highly praised science writer Shelley Emling shows how Marie Curie was nothing short of an iconoclast. Her affair with a younger and married man drew the enmity of a xenophobic French establishment, who denied her entry to the Academy of Sciences and tried to expel her from France. But she was determined to live life how she saw fit, and passed on her resilience to her daughters. Emling draws on personal letters released by Curie's only granddaughter to show how Marie influenced her daughters yet let them blaze their own paths. Irene followed her mother's footsteps into science and was instrumental in the discovery of nuclear fission. Eve traveled the world as a foreign correspondent and then moved on to humanitarian missions. Emling also shows how Curie, following World War I, turned to America for help. Few people know about Curie's close friendship with American journalist Missy Meloney, who arranged speaking tours across the country for Marie and Eve and Irene. Months on the road, charming audiences both large and small, endeared the Curies to American women and established a lifelong relationship with the United States that formed one of the strongest connections of Marie's life. Without the financial support of American women, Marie might not have been able to go on with her research. Continuing the family story into the third generation, Emling also interviews Marie Curie's granddaughter Helene Joliot-Curie, who is an accomplished physicist in her own right. She reveals why her grandmother was a lot more than just a scientist and how Marie's trips to America forever changed her. Factually rich, personal and original, this is an engrossing story about the most famous woman in science that rips the cover off the myth and reveals the real person, friend, and mother behind it.
Read More

A Life in Physics

Author: Ruth Lewin Sime

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 9780520208605

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 526

View: 4042

Traces the life of a Jewish physicist who had to flee Nazi Germany, codiscovered nuclear fission with Otto Hahn and Fritz Strassmann, but was denied recognition when the work received a Nobel Prize
Read More