Depression Years, 1933-40

Author: A.J. Badger

Publisher: Macmillan International Higher Education

ISBN: 1349188484

Category: History

Page: 408

View: 995

This is a study of recent case studies of the New Deal which assesses the impact of the depression and New Deal programmes on businessmen, industrial workers and the unemployed. It explains the political and ideological constraints which limited the changes wrought by the New Deal.
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How Roosevelt and His New Deal Prolonged the Great Depression

Author: Jim Powell

Publisher: Crown

ISBN: 9780307420718

Category: History

Page: 352

View: 9430

The Great Depression and the New Deal. For generations, the collective American consciousness has believed that the former ruined the country and the latter saved it. Endless praise has been heaped upon President Franklin Delano Roosevelt for masterfully reining in the Depression’s destructive effects and propping up the country on his New Deal platform. In fact, FDR has achieved mythical status in American history and is considered to be, along with Washington, Jefferson, and Lincoln, one of the greatest presidents of all time. But would the Great Depression have been so catastrophic had the New Deal never been implemented? In FDR’s Folly, historian Jim Powell argues that it was in fact the New Deal itself, with its shortsighted programs, that deepened the Great Depression, swelled the federal government, and prevented the country from turning around quickly. You’ll discover in alarming detail how FDR’s federal programs hurt America more than helped it, with effects we still feel today, including: • How Social Security actually increased unemployment • How higher taxes undermined good businesses • How new labor laws threw people out of work • And much more This groundbreaking book pulls back the shroud of awe and the cloak of time enveloping FDR to prove convincingly how flawed his economic policies actually were, despite his good intentions and the astounding intellect of his circle of advisers. In today’s turbulent domestic and global environment, eerily similar to that of the 1930s, it’s more important than ever before to uncover and understand the truth of our history, lest we be doomed to repeat it.
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1932-1940

Author: William E. Leuchtenburg

Publisher: Harper Collins

ISBN: 0061836966

Category: History

Page: 432

View: 1485

When the stability of American life was threatened by the Great Depression, the decisive and visionary policy contained in FDR's New Deal offered America a way forward. In this groundbreaking work, William E. Leuchtenburg traces the evolution of what was both the most controversial and effective socioeconomic initiative ever undertaken in the United States—and explains how the social fabric of American life was forever altered. It offers illuminating lessons on the challenges of economic transformation—for our time and for all time.
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America in Prosperity and Depression, 1920-1941

Author: Michael E. Parrish

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN: 9780393311341

Category: History

Page: 529

View: 9965

"Impressively detailed. . . . An authoritative and epic overview." -- Publishers Weekly
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How FDR's Economic Legacy Has Damaged America

Author: Burton W. Folsom

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1416592377

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 318

View: 7935

A revisionist perspective on FDR's presidency and the New Deal argues that such government programs as social security, minimum wage, and farm subsidies didn't work in the 1930s and do not work now, and traces many modern problems to the FDR administration.
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1933-1935, The Age of Roosevelt

Author: Arthur M. Schlesinger

Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

ISBN: 0547527640

Category: History

Page: 688

View: 3954

The Coming of the New Deal, 1933-1935, volume two of Pulitzer Prize-winning historian and biographer Arthur M. Schlesinger, Jr.’s Age of Roosevelt series, describes Franklin Delano Roosevelt’s first tumultuous years in the White House. Coming into office at the bottom of the Great Depression, FDR told the American people that they have nothing to fear but fear itself. The conventional wisdom having failed, he tried unorthodox remedies to avert economic collapse. His first hundred days restored national morale, and his New Dealers filled Washington with new approaches to recovery and reform. Combining idealistic ends with realistic means, Roosevelt proposed to humanize, redeem, and rescue capitalism. The Coming of the New Deal, written with Schlesinger’s customary verve, is a gripping account of critical years in the history of the republic.
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An Anthony J. Badger Reader

Author: Anthony J. Badger

Publisher: University of Arkansas Press

ISBN: 1557288445

Category: History

Page: 270

View: 613

Contains twelve essays that examine how white liberal southern politicians who came to prominence in the New Deal and World War II handled the race issue when it became central to politics in the 1950s and 1960s. This book states that it was the southern business leaders and New South politicians who mediated the transition to desegregation.
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Author: Anthony J. Badger

Publisher: Macmillan

ISBN: 0809015609

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 200

View: 2000

A chronicle of the initial fifteen weeks of the thirty-second president's administration evaluates FDR's accomplishments while offering insight into why they have been upheld as a measure for subsequent presidencies, in an account that includes coverage of such topics as period unemployment, financial challenges, and the sixteen major bills that increased executive discretionary powers. Reprint.
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The Left-Liberal Tradition in America

Author: Doug Rossinow

Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

ISBN: 0812220951

Category: History

Page: 336

View: 9381

Liberals and leftists in the United States have not always been estranged from one another as they are today. Historian Doug Rossinow examines how the cooperation and the creative tension between left-wing radicals and liberal reformers advanced many of the most important political values of the twentieth century, including free speech, freedom of conscience, and racial equality. Visions of Progress chronicles the broad alliances of radical and liberal figures who were driven by a particular concept of social progress—a transformative vision in which the country would become not simply wealthier or a bit fairer but fundamentally more democratic, just, and united. Believers in this vision—from the settlement-house pioneer Jane Addams and the civil rights leader W. E. B. Du Bois in the 1890s and after, to the founders of the ACLU in the 1920s, to Minnesota Governor Floyd Olson and assorted labor-union radicals in the 1930s, to New Dealer Henry Wallace in the 1940s—belonged to a left-liberal tradition in America. They helped push political leaders, including Presidents Woodrow Wilson, Franklin Roosevelt, and Harry Truman, toward reforms that made the goals of opportunity and security real for ever more Americans. Yet, during the Cold War era of the 1950s and '60s, leftists and liberals came to view one another as enemies, and their influential alliance all but vanished. Visions of Progress revisits the period between the 1880s and the 1940s, when reformers and radicals worked together along a middle path between the revolutionary left and establishment liberalism. Rossinow takes the story up to the present, showing how the progressive connection was lost and explaining the consequences that followed. This book introduces today's progressives to their historical predecessors, while offering an ambitious reinterpretation of issues in American political history.
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America in Prosperity and Depression, 1920-1941

Author: Michael E. Parrish

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN: 9780393311341

Category: History

Page: 529

View: 7295

"Impressively detailed. . . . An authoritative and epic overview." -- Publishers Weekly
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The Emergence of Civil Rights as a National Issue

Author: Harvard Sitkoff

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 9780195028935

Category: History

Page: 397

View: 924

Traces the emergence of civil rights as a national concern to the depression decade and looks at the philosophies, individuals, institutions, and social conditions that fostered the move against racial injustice
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Author: Elliot A. Rosen

Publisher: University of Virginia Press

ISBN: 0813934273

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 1234

Historians have often speculated on the alternative paths the United Stages might have taken during the Great Depression: What if Franklin D. Roosevelt had been killed by one of Giuseppe Zangara’s bullets in Miami on February 17, 1933? Would there have been a New Deal under an administration led by Herbert Hoover had he been reelected in 1932? To what degree were Roosevelt’s own ideas and inclinations, as opposed to those of his contemporaries, essential to the formulation of New Deal policies? In Roosevelt, the Great Depression, and the Economics of Recovery, the eminent historian Elliot A. Rosen examines these and other questions, exploring the causes of the Great Depression and America’s recovery from it in relation to the policies and policy alternatives that were in play during the New Deal era. Evaluating policies in economic terms, and disentangling economic claims from political ideology, Rosen argues that while planning efforts and full-employment policies were essential for coping with the emergency of the depression, from an economic standpoint it is in fact fortunate that they did not become permanent elements of our political economy. By insisting that the economic bases of proposals be accurately represented in debating their merits, Rosen reveals that the productivity gains, which accelerated in the years following the 1929 stock market crash, were more responsible for long-term economic recovery than were governmental policies. Based on broad and extensive archival research, Roosevelt, the Great Depression, and the Economics of Recovery is at once an erudite and authoritative history of New Deal economic policy and timely background reading for current debates on domestic and global economic policy.
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Author: Michael Hiltzik

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 143915449X

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 512

View: 5605

Franklin Roosevelt's New Deal began as a program of short-term emergency relief measures and evolved into a truly transformative concept of the federal government's role in Americans' lives. More than an economic recovery plan, it was a reordering of the political system that continues to define America to this day. With this book, writer Michael Hiltzik offers fresh insights into this inflection point in the American experience. He shows how Roosevelt, through force of personality, commanded the loyalty of the fiscal conservatives and radical agrarians alike--yet the same character traits that made him a great leader would sow the seeds of the New Deal's end. Understanding the New Deal may be more important today than at any time in the last eight decades. Conceived in response to a devastating financial crisis very similar to America's most recent downturn--the New Deal remade the country's economic and political environment in six years of intensive experimentation, and provided a model for subsequent presidents who faced challenging economic conditions, right up to the present.--From publisher description.
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The American Presidents Series: The 32nd President, 1933-1945

Author: Roy Jenkins

Publisher: Macmillan

ISBN: 1466833076

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 208

View: 6731

A masterly work by the New York Times bestselling author of Churchill and Gladstone A protean figure and a man of massive achievement, Franklin Delano Roosevelt was the only man to be elected to the presidency more than twice. In a ranking of chief executives, no more than three of his predecessors could truly be placed in contention with his standing, and of his successors, there are so far none. In acute, stylish prose, Roy Jenkins tackles all of the nuances and intricacies of FDR's character. He was a skilled politician with astounding flexibility; he oversaw an incomparable mobilization of American industrial and military effort; and, all the while, he aroused great loyalty and dazzled those around him with his personal charm. Despite several setbacks and one apparent catastrophe, his life was buoyed by the influence of Eleanor, who was not only a wife but an adviser and one of the twentieth century's greatest political reformers. Nearly complete before Jenkins's death in January 2003, this volume was finished by historian Richard Neustadt.
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The Great Depression, Lorena Hickok, Eleanor Roosevelt, and the Shaping of the New Deal

Author: Michael Golay

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 143919601X

Category: History

Page: 316

View: 2814

Documents the 18-month journey of woman journalist Lorena Hickok during the height of the Great Depression, recounting her experiences and influence in some of the nation's worst-hit regions as documented in almost daily letters written to close friend Eleanor Roosevelt.
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The Twilight of Constitutionalism and the Triumph of Progressivism

Author: Paul D. Moreno

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107032954

Category: History

Page: 349

View: 3496

The story of the breakdown of limited government in America and the rise of the federal state.
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Letters from the Forgotten Man

Author: Robert S. McElvaine

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

ISBN: 9780807898819

Category: History

Page: 280

View: 5235

Down and Out in the Great Depression is a moving, revealing collection of letters by the forgotten men, women, and children who suffered through one of the greatest periods of hardship in American history. Sifting through some 15,000 letters from government and private sources, Robert McElvaine has culled nearly 200 communications that best show the problems, thoughts, and emotions of ordinary people during this time. Unlike views of Depression life "from the bottom up" that rely on recollections recorded several decades later, this book captures the daily anguish of people during the thirties. It puts the reader in direct contact with Depression victims, evoking a feeling of what it was like to live through this disaster. Following Franklin D. Roosevelt's inauguration, both the number of letters received by the White House and the percentage of them coming from the poor were unprecedented. The average number of daily communications jumped to between 5,000 and 8,000, a trend that continued throughout the Rosevelt administration. The White House staff for answering such letters--most of which were directed to FDR, Eleanor Roosevelt, or Harry Hopkins--quickly grew from one person to fifty. Mainly because of his radio talks, many felt they knew the president personally and could confide in him. They viewed the Roosevelts as parent figures, offering solace, help, and protection. Roosevelt himself valued the letters, perceiving them as a way to gauge public sentiment. The writers came from a number of different groups--middle-class people, blacks, rural residents, the elderly, and children. Their letters display emotional reactions to the Depression--despair, cynicism, and anger--and attitudes toward relief. In his extensive introduction, McElvaine sets the stage for the letters, discussing their significance and some of the themes that emerge from them. By preserving their original spelling, syntax, grammar, and capitalization, he conveys their full flavor. The Depression was far more than an economic collapse. It was the major personal event in the lives of tens of millions of Americans. McElvaine shows that, contrary to popular belief, many sufferers were not passive victims of history. Rather, he says, they were "also actors and, to an extent, playwrights, producers, and directors as well," taking an active role in trying to deal with their plight and solve their problems. For this twenty-fifth anniversary edition, McElvaine provides a new foreword recounting the history of the book, its impact on the historiography of the Depression, and its continued importance today.
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The Untold Story of FDR, the Supreme Court, and the Battle over Gold

Author: Sebastian Edwards

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 1400890381

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 288

View: 2182

The untold story of how FDR did the unthinkable to save the American economy The American economy is strong in large part because nobody believes that America would ever default on its debt. Yet in 1933, Franklin D. Roosevelt did just that, when in a bid to pull the country out of depression, he depreciated the U.S. dollar in relation to gold, effectively annulling all debt contracts. American Default is the story of this forgotten chapter in America's history. Sebastian Edwards provides a compelling account of the economic and legal drama that embroiled a nation already reeling from global financial collapse. It began on April 5, 1933, when FDR ordered Americans to sell all their gold holdings to the government. This was followed by the abandonment of the gold standard, the unilateral and retroactive rewriting of contracts, and the devaluation of the dollar. Anyone who held public and private debt suddenly saw its value reduced by nearly half, and debtors--including the U.S. government—suddenly owed their creditors far less. Revaluing the dollar imposed a hefty loss on investors and savers, many of them middle-class American families. The banks fought back, and a bitter battle for gold ensued. In early 1935, the case went to the Supreme Court. Edwards describes FDR's rancorous clashes with conservative Chief Justice Charles Evans Hughes, a confrontation that threatened to finish the New Deal for good—and that led to FDR's attempt to pack the court in 1937. At a time when several major economies never approached the brink of default or devaluing or recalling currencies, American Default is a timely account of a little-known yet drastic experiment with these policies, the inevitable backlash, and the ultimate result.
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