Lost Civilizations

Author: Geoffrey Parker,Brenda Parker

Publisher: Reaktion Books

ISBN: 1780236980

Category: History

Page: 224

View: 431

During the first and second millennia BCE a swathe of nomadic peoples migrated outward from Central Asia into the Eurasian periphery. One group of these people would find themselves encamped in an unpromising, arid region just south of the Caspian Sea. From these modest and uncertain beginnings, they would go on to form one of the most powerful empires in history: the Persian Empire. In this book, Geoffrey and Brenda Parker tell the captivating story of this ancient civilization and its enduring legacy to the world. The authors examine the unique features of Persian life and trace their influence throughout the centuries. They examine the environmental difficulties the early Persians encountered and how, in overcoming them, they were able to develop a unique culture that would culminate in the massive, first empire, the Achaemenid Empire. Extending their influence into the maritime west, they fought the Greeks for mastery of the eastern Mediterranean—one of the most significant geopolitical contests of the ancient world. And the authors paint vivid portraits of Persian cities and their spectacular achievements: intricate and far-reaching roadways, an astonishing irrigation system that created desert paradises, and, above all, an extraordinary reflection of the diverse peoples that inhabited them. Informed and original, this is a history of an incomparable culture whose influence can still be seen, millennia later, in modern-day Iran and the wider Middle East.
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Lost Civilizations

Author: Geoffrey Parker,Brenda Parker

Publisher: Reaktion Books

ISBN: 1780236506

Category: Iran

Page: 224

View: 1144

During the first and second millennia BCE a swathe of nomadic peoples migrated outward from Central Asia into the Eurasian periphery. One group of these people would find themselves encamped in an unpromising, arid region just south of the Caspian Sea. From these modest and uncertain beginnings, they would go on to form one of the most powerful empires in history: the Persian Empire. In this book, Geoffrey and Brenda Parker tell the captivating story of this ancient civilization and its enduring legacy to the world. The authors examine the unique features of Persian life and trace their influence throughout the centuries. They examine the environmental difficulties the early Persians encountered and how, in overcoming them, they were able to develop a unique culture that would culminate in the massive, first empire, the Achaemenid Empire. Extending their influence into the maritime west, they fought the Greeks for mastery of the eastern Mediterranean--one of the most significant geopolitical contests of the ancient world. And the authors paint vivid portraits of Persian cities and their spectacular achievements: intricate and far-reaching roadways, an astonishing irrigation system that created desert paradises, and, above all, an extraordinary reflection of the diverse peoples that inhabited them. Informed and original, this is a history of an incomparable culture whose influence can still be seen, millennia later, in modern-day Iran and the wider Middle East.
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The World of Ancient Persia

Author: John Curtis,Nigel Tallis

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520247310

Category: Art

Page: 272

View: 1077

A richly-illustrated and important book that traces the rise and fall of one of the ancient world's largest and richest empires.
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Masters of Empire

Author: Time-Life Books

Publisher: Time Life Education

ISBN: 9780809491049

Category: History

Page: 168

View: 6221

Looks at the history and culture of the Persians and describes the ruins and artifacts they left behind
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Lost Civilizations

Author: Andrew Robinson

Publisher: Reaktion Books

ISBN: 1780235410

Category: History

Page: 192

View: 4722

When Alexander the Great invaded the Indus Valley in the fourth century BCE, he was completely unaware that it had once been the center of a civilization that could have challenged ancient Egypt and neighboring Mesopotamia in size and sophistication. In this accessible introduction, Andrew Robinson tells the story—so far as we know it—of this enigmatic people, who lay forgotten for around 4,000 years. Going back to 2600 BCE, Robinson investigates a civilization that flourished over half a millennium, until 1900 BCE, when it mysteriously declined and eventually vanished. Only in the 1920s, did British and Indian archaeologists in search of Alexander stumble upon the ruins of a civilization in what is now northwest India and eastern Pakistan. Robinson surveys a network of settlements—more than 1,000—that covered over 800,000 square kilometers. He examines the technically advanced features of some of the civilization’s ancient cities, such as Harappa and Mohenjo-daro, where archaeologists have found finely crafted gemstone jewelry, an exquisite part-pictographic writing system (still requiring decipherment), apparently Hindu symbolism, plumbing systems that would not be bettered until the Roman empire, and street planning worthy of our modern world. He also notes what is missing: any evidence of warfare, notwithstanding an adventurous maritime trade between the Indus cities and Mesopotamia via the Persian Gulf. A fascinating look at a tantalizingly “lost” civilization, this book is a testament to its artistic excellence, technological progress, economic vigor, and social tolerance, not to mention the Indus legacy to modern South Asia and the wider world.
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Author: Peter Bogucki

Publisher: Reaktion Books

ISBN: 1780237650

Category: History

Page: 208

View: 1326

We often think of the civilizations of ancient Greece and Rome as discrete incubators of Western culture, places where ideas about everything from government to art to philosophy were free to develop and then be distributed outward into the wider Mediterranean world. But as Peter Bogucki reminds us in this book, Greece and Rome did not develop in isolation. All around them were rural communities who had remarkably different cultures, ones few of us know anything about. Telling the stories of these nearly forgotten people, he offers a long-overdue enrichment of how we think about classical antiquity. As Bogucki shows, the lands to the north of the Greek and Roman peninsulas were inhabited by non-literate communities that stretched across river valleys, mountains, plains, and shorelines from the Atlantic Ocean in the west to the Ural Mountains in the east. What we know about them is almost exclusively through archeological finds of settlements, offerings, monuments, and burials—but these remnants paint a portrait that is just as compelling as that of the great literate, urban civilizations of this time. Bogucki sketches the development of these groups’ cultures from the Stone Age through the collapse of the Roman Empire in the west, highlighting the increasing complexity of their societal structures, their technological accomplishments, and their distinct cultural practices. He shows that we are still learning much about them, as he examines new historical and archeological discoveries as well as the ways our knowledge about these groups has led to a vibrant tourist industry and even influenced politics. The result is a fascinating account of several nearly vanished cultures and the modern methods that have allowed us to rescue them from historical oblivion.
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Cities of Eden

Author: Time-Life Books

Publisher: Time Life Medical

ISBN: 9780809498871

Category: History

Page: 168

View: 7312

Surveys what is known about the ancient Babylonian civilization, looks at ruins and artifacts, and describes the work of archaeologists in the region
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Author: Tom Holland

Publisher: Anchor

ISBN: 9780307386984

Category: History

Page: 464

View: 4563

A "fresh...thrilling" (The Guardian) account of the Graeco-Persian Wars. In the fifth century B.C., a global superpower was determined to bring truth and order to what it regarded as two terrorist states. The superpower was Persia, incomparably rich in ambition, gold, and men. The terrorist states were Athens and Sparta, eccentric cities in a poor and mountainous backwater: Greece. The story of how their citizens took on the Great King of Persia, and thereby saved not only themselves but Western civilization as well, is as heart-stopping and fateful as any episode in history. Tom Holland’s brilliant study of these critical Persian Wars skillfully examines a conflict of critical importance to both ancient and modern history.
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Lost Civilizations

Author: David M. Gwynn

Publisher: Reaktion Books

ISBN: 1780238924

Category: History

Page: 208

View: 3548

The Goths are truly a “lost civilization.” Sweeping down from the north, ancient Gothic tribes sacked the imperial city of Rome and set in motion the decline and fall of the western Roman empire. Ostrogothic and Visigothic kings ruled over Italy and Spain, dominating early medieval Europe. Yet after the last Gothic kingdom fell more than a thousand years ago, the Goths disappeared as an independent people. Over the centuries that followed, as traces of Gothic civilization vanished, its people came to be remembered as both barbaric destroyers and heroic champions of liberty. In this engaging history, David M. Gwynn brings together the interwoven stories of the original Goths and the diverse Gothic heritage, a heritage that continues to shape our modern world. From the ancient migrations to contemporary Goth culture, through debates over democratic freedom and European nationalism, and drawing on writers from Shakespeare to Bram Stoker, Gwynn explores the ever-widening gulf between the Goths of history and the popular imagination. Historians, students of architecture and literature, and general readers alike will learn something new about this great lost civilization.
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The Forgotten Byzantine Empire That Rescued Western Civilization

Author: Lars Brownworth

Publisher: Broadway Books

ISBN: 9780307462411

Category: History

Page: 352

View: 4692

Filled with unforgettable stories of emperors, generals, and religious patriarchs, as well as fascinating glimpses into the life of the ordinary citizen, Lost to the West reveals how much we owe to the Byzantine Empire that was the equal of any in its achievements, appetites, and enduring legacy. For more than a millennium, Byzantium reigned as the glittering seat of Christian civilization. When Europe fell into the Dark Ages, Byzantium held fast against Muslim expansion, keeping Christianity alive. Streams of wealth flowed into Constantinople, making possible unprecedented wonders of art and architecture. And the emperors who ruled Byzantium enacted a saga of political intrigue and conquest as astonishing as anything in recorded history. Lost to the West is replete with stories of assassination, mass mutilation and execution, sexual scheming, ruthless grasping for power, and clashing armies that soaked battlefields with the blood of slain warriors numbering in the tens of thousands. From the Hardcover edition.
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Neighbours and Rivals

Author: Beate Dignas,Engelbert Winter

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 052184925X

Category: History

Page: 347

View: 4863

A narrative history, with sourcebook, of the turbulent relations between Rome and the Sasanian Empire.
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Greece, Persia, and the End of the Golden Age

Author: Robin Waterfield

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 9780674023567

Category: History

Page: 248

View: 1447

"With this first masterpiece of Western military history forming the backbone of his book, Robin Waterfield explores what remains unsaid and assumed in Xenophon's account - much about the gruesome nature of ancient battle and logistics, the lives of Greek and Persian soldiers, and questions of historical, political, and personal context, motivation, and conflicting agendas. The result is a rounded version of the story of Cyrus's ill-fated march and the Greeks' perilous retreat - a nuanced and dramatic perspective on a critical moment in history that may tell us as much about our present-day adventures in the Middle East, site of Cyrus's debacle and the last act of the Golden Age, as it does about the great powers of antiquity in a volatile period of transition."--BOOK JACKET.
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Cauldron of Cultures

Author: N.A

Publisher: Time Life Education

ISBN: 9780809491087

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 168

View: 3375

Traces the history of civilization in ancient Asiatic Turkey; examines the ruins and artifacts of its Persian, Roman, Greek, and other cultural heritages; and describes recent archaeological finds
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The Arabs in the East

Author: Richard Nelson Frye

Publisher: Phoenix

ISBN: 9781842120118

Category: History

Page: 289

View: 6722

A definitive history of the birth and development of the great age of Iranian civilization. This culture, resulting from the fusion of Iran’s embrace of Islam, was influential in the birth of splendid art, architecture, and poetry. Advances in medicine and science also flourished. “Excellently written and well-organized...a sound but reflectively new study of Islam’s penetration...intro Iran.”—Peter Avery, The Middle East Journal.
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The City-state Through History

Author: Geoffrey Parker

Publisher: Reaktion Books

ISBN: 9781861892195

Category: Political Science

Page: 253

View: 1644

This title provides an examination of the rise, evolution and decline of the city-state, from ancient times to the present day.
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Cities as Symbols of Empire

Author: Geoffrey Parker

Publisher: Reaktion Books

ISBN: 1780233264

Category: History

Page: 224

View: 3792

From ancient Persia to the Third Reich, imperial powers have built cities in their image, seeking to reflect their power and influence through a show of magnificence and a reflection of their values. Statues, pictures, temples, palaces—all combine to produce the necessary justification for the wielding of power while intimidating opponents. In Power in Stone, Geoffrey Parker traces the very nature of power through history by exploring the structural symbolism of these cities. Traveling from Persepolis to Constantinople, Saint Petersburg to Beijing and Delhi, Parker considers how these structures and monuments were brought together to make the most powerful statement and how that power was wielded to the greatest advantage. He examines imperial leaders, their architects, and their engineers to create a new understanding of the relationship among buildings, design, and power. He concludes with a look at the changing nature of power in the late twentieth and twenty-first centuries and the way this is reflected symbolically in contemporary buildings and urban plans. With illuminating images, Power in Stone is a fascinating history of some of the world’s most intriguing cities, past and present.
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A Persian Life

Author: Richard Stoneman

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 0300216041

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 288

View: 7503

Xerxes, Great King of the Persian Empire from 486–465 B.C., has gone down in history as an angry tyrant full of insane ambition. The stand of Leonidas and the 300 against his army at Thermopylae is a byword for courage, while the failure of Xerxes’ expedition has overshadowed all the other achievements of his twenty-two-year reign. In this lively and comprehensive new biography, Richard Stoneman shows how Xerxes, despite sympathetic treatment by the contemporary Greek writers Aeschylus and Herodotus, had his reputation destroyed by later Greek writers and by the propaganda of Alexander the Great. Stoneman draws on the latest research in Achaemenid studies and archaeology to present the ruler from the Persian perspective. This illuminating volume does not whitewash Xerxes’ failings but sets against them such triumphs as the architectural splendor of Persepolis and a consideration of Xerxes’ religious commitments. What emerges is a nuanced portrait of a man who ruled a vast and multicultural empire which the Greek communities of the West saw as the antithesis of their own values.
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Author: Reader's Digest Association

Publisher: Putnam Publishing Group

ISBN: 9780276426582

Category: Social Science

Page: 320

View: 4939

Looks at some of the world's long-lost civilizations, describing each culture's artifacts and efforts of archaeologists to reconstruct these complex societies, including Catal Huyuk, Mycenae, Babylon, and Pataliputra.
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Treasures from a Lost Civilization

Author: Robert W. Bagley

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 9780691088518

Category: Art

Page: 359

View: 2913

A companion volume to the traveling exhibition highlights 128 works of bronze, jade, and clay dating from the thirteenth century B.C. to the second century A.D. and explains their immense archaeological importance.
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Author: Albert T. Olmstead,Albert Ten Eyck Olmstead,Arthur T. Olmstead

Publisher: Phoenix Books

ISBN: 9780226627779

Category: History

Page: 568

View: 9258

Traces the achievements of the Iranian empire through two centuries of glory to its downfall in the third century B.C
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