Author: Suzanne Dixon

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN: 9780801842009

Category: History

Page: 279

View: 9342

Unfaithful spouses, divorce and remarriage, rebellious children, aging parents--today's headlines are filled with issues said to be responsible for a "breakdown" of the traditional family. But are any of these problems truly new? What can we learn from the ways in which societies dealt with them in the past? Suzanne Dixon sets the current debate about the family against a broader context in The Roman Family, the first book to bring together what historians, anthropologists, and philologists have learned about the family in ancient Rome. Dixon begins by reviewing the controversies regarding the family in general and the Roman family in particular. After considering the problems of evidence, she explores what the Roman concept of "family" really meant and how Roman families functioned. Turning to the legal status of the Roman family, she shows how previous studies, which relied exclusively on legal evidence, fell short of describing the reality of Roman life. (Many relations not recognized by law--the slave family, for instance, or the marriage of imperial soldiers--were tolerated socially and eventually gained some legal recognition.) Other topics include love and other aspects of the institution of marriage, the role of the children in the family, how families adjusted to new members, and how they dealt with aging and death.
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Status, Sentiment, Space

Author: Beryl Rawson,Paul Weaver

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780198152835

Category: History

Page: 378

View: 8515

The family continues to be seen as a central institution in Roman as well as modern, Western society. The Roman family is often used as a stereotype, sometimes of severity, sometimes of decadence, with its decline often cited as a cause of wider decline and fall. Definitions and concepts continue to be modified and nuanced, however, as the availability of new evidence and new methodologies make possible a much less simplistic picture. In this volume, the study of family draws on a wide range of disciplines to develop the intertwined themes of status, sentiment, and space. For example, on status there are contributions about Junian Latins and a survey of senators' monuments, while sentiment is represented by a gloomy but convincing picture of old age and a paper on the sentimental ideal which argues that conflict as well as concord is a feature of family life. Space is represented, among others, by the contribution on who commemorates whom in Roman Italy, pointing up the regional variations in custom and the difficulties in tracing complete families. The final contributions focus on the house: how people lived in the Roman house, the use of rooms, and the artefacts that might indicate this use. The book makes use of many types of evidence from the legal and literary to the iconographical and archaeological. Visual and material evidence play an important role in reconstructing real lives in considerable colour and variety. The book moves beyond the city of Rometo the rest of Roman Italy and even into the provinces, just as Roman culture moved outwards and mingled with other cultures. Chronologically too there are new directions, towards the later Empire and Christianity. So, although the contributors do not abandon any of the territory already gained in Rome, nor literary and epigraphical sources, nor the late Republic or early Empire, there is an exciting sense of new discovery.
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Rome, Italy, and Beyond

Author: Michele George

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 019926841X

Category: History

Page: 358

View: 2528

This is the first book on Roman family life to include studies of the family in the Roman provinces. Subjects treated include family values, the relationship between parents and children, family tensions, marriage patterns, and family commemorations on tombstones. The authors use a variety of ancient evidence and different methodologies to reach their conclusions about Roman influence on provincial culture.
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New Perspectives

Author: Beryl Rawson

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN: 9780801494604

Category: History

Page: 279

View: 929

Essays discuss the structure of the Roman family, women and succession, family finances, the status of children, wet-nurses, and legal rights
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Author: Richard P. Saller

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521599788

Category: History

Page: 249

View: 1479

This innovative study of the patriarchy belies the accepted notion of the father figure as tyrannical and exploitative.
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Studies in Roman Social History

Author: K. R. Bradley

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 9780195058581

Category: History

Page: 216

View: 4051

These essays on various aspects of family life in ancient Rome offer an especially timely and provocative new characterization of how this most elementary component of Roman society was structured. Recognizing that a traditional nuclear model is necessary for a basic understanding of Roman family organization, Keith R. Bradley argues that a broader, more extensive context must be established if this structure is to be fully appreciated. Examining the roles of slaves, servants, and other surrogates in the upbringing and socialization of children, and concentrating on the parts played by wet-nurses and male childerminders, his book molds an entirely new framework for the study of the Roman family. He investigates the extent of serial marriage, especially among the upper-classes, and the effects of the widespread familial dislocation that resulted, and for the first time considers the prevalence of child labor in the Roman world, contrasting the experiences of upper-class and lower-class children. Bringing these themes together in a lively final section through a fresh, thorough examination of Cicero's correspondence, Bradley portrays the life of an actual Roman family. A seminal contribution to Roman social history, this book is essential reading for anyone interested in how the family worked and lived in classical times.
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Author: Lena Larsson Loven,Mary Harlow

Publisher: A&C Black

ISBN: 1441174680

Category: Family & Relationships

Page: 272

View: 4345

This volume seeks to explain developments within the structure of the family in antiquity, in particular in the later Roman Empire and late antiquity. Contributions extend the traditional chronological focus on the Roman family to include the transformation of familial structures in the newly formed kingdoms of late antiquity in Europe, thus allowing a greater historical perspective and establishing a new paradigm for the study of the Roman family. Drawing on the latest research by leading scholars in the field the book includes new approaches to the life course and the family in the Byzantine empire, family relationships in the dynasty of Constantine the Great, death, burial and commemoration of newborn children in Roman Italy, and widows and familial networks in Roman Egypt. In short, this volume seeks to establish a new agenda for the understanding of the Roman family and its transformation in late antiquity.
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Author: Bruce W. Frier,Thomas A. McGinn

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN: 9780195161854

Category: History

Page: 506

View: 2316

The Roman household (familia) was in many respects dramatically different from the modern family. From the early Roman Empire (30 B.C. to about A.D. 250) there survive many legal sources that describe Roman households, often in the most intimate detail. The subject matter of these ancient sources includes marriage and divorce, the property aspects of marriage, the pattern of authority within households, the transmission of property between generations, and the supervision of Roman orphans. This casebook presents 235 representative texts drawn largely from Roman legal sources, especially Justinian's Digest. These cases and the discussion questions that follow provide a good introduction to the basic legal problems associated with the ordinary families of Roman citizens. The arrangement of materials conveys to students an understanding of the basic rules of Roman family law while also providing them with the means to question these rules and explore the broader legal principles that underlie them. Included cases invite the reader to wrestle with actual Roman legal problems, as well as to think about Roman solutions in relation to modern law. In the process, the reader should gain confidence in handling fundamental forms of legal thinking, which have persisted virtually unchanged from Roman times until the present. This volume also contains a glossary of technical terms, biographies of the jurists, basic bibliographies of useful secondary literature, and a detailed introduction to the scholarly topics associated with Roman family law. A course based on this casebook should be of interest to anyone who wishes to understand better Roman social history, either as part of a larger Classical Civilization curriculum or as a preparation for law school.
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Author: Baby Professor

Publisher: Speedy Publishing LLC

ISBN: 1541920627

Category: Juvenile Fiction

Page: 64

View: 3148

If you open this book, you will discover how living in the Ancient Roman times and today are worlds apart. Everything is very different, including the way people dress, talk and even entertain themselves. Societies were different as well as governments. Looking back into the past will lead to a deeper appreciation of the present and that’s why history matters. Grab this book today!
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Author: Beryl Rawson

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 9781444390759

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 664

View: 1660

A Companion to Families in the Greek and Roman Worlds draws from both established and current scholarship to offer a broad overview of the field, engage in contemporary debates, and pose stimulating questions about future development in the study of families. Provides up-to-date research on family structure from archaeology, art, social, cultural, and economic history Includes contributions from established and rising international scholars Features illustrations of families, children, slaves, and ritual life, along with maps and diagrams of sites and dwellings Honorable Mention for 2011 Single Volume Reference/Humanities & Social Sciences PROSE award granted by the Association of American Publishers
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Author: Beth Severy

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134391838

Category: Family & Relationships

Page: 304

View: 1658

In this lively and detailed study, Beth Severy examines the relationship between the emergence of the Roman Empire and the status and role of this family in Roman society. The family is placed within the social and historical context of the transition from republic to empire, from Augustus' rise to sole power into the early reign of his successor Tiberius. Augustus and the Family at the Birth of the Roman Empire is an outstanding example of how, if we examine "private" issues such as those of family and gender, we gain a greater understanding of "public" concerns such as politics, religion and history. Discussing evidence from sculpture to cults and from monuments to military history, the book pursues the changing lines between public and private, family and state that gave shape to the Roman imperial system.
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Author: Kate Cooper

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 113946910X

Category: History

Page: N.A

View: 822

Edward Gibbon laid the fall of the Roman Empire at Christianity's door, suggesting that 'pusillanimous youth preferred the penance of the monastic to the dangers of a military life ... whole legions were buried in these religious sanctuaries'. This surprising 2007 study suggests that, far from seeing Christianity as the cause of the fall of the Roman Empire, we should understand the Christianisation of the household as a central Roman survival strategy. By establishing new 'ground rules' for marriage and family life, the Roman Christians of the last century of the Western empire found a way to re-invent the Roman family as a social institution to weather the political, military, and social upheaval of two centuries of invasion and civil war. In doing so, these men and women - both clergy and lay - found themselves changing both what it meant to be Roman, and what it meant to be Christian.
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A Day in the Life of a Roman Family

Author: Paul Chrystal

Publisher: Amberley Publishing Limited

ISBN: 1445665654

Category: History

Page: 96

View: 768

A Guide to Everyday Life in Ancient Rome from break of day to dead of night
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Author: Jane F. Gardner

Publisher: Clarendon Press

ISBN: 0191584533

Category: History

Page: 316

View: 8592

Roman families were infinitely diverse, but the basis of Roman civil law was the familia, a strictly-defined group consisting of a head, paterfamilias, and his descendants in the male line. Recent work on the Roman family mainly ignores the familia, in favour of examining such matters as emotional relationships within families, the practical effects of control by a paterfamilias, and demographic factors producing families which did not fit the familia-pattern. This book investigates the interrelationship between family and familia, especially how families exploited the legal rules for their own ends, and disrupted the familia, by use of emancipation (release from patria potestas) and adoption. It also traces legal responses to the effects of demographic factors, which gave increased importance to maternal connections, and to social, such as the difficulties for ex-slaves in conforming to the familia-pattern. The familia as a legal institution remained virtually unchanged; nevertheless Roman family law underwent substantial changes, to meet the needs and desires of Roman society.
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Author: Susan Treggiari

Publisher: Psychology Press

ISBN: 0415195225

Category: History

Page: 170

View: 4725

This lively and original guidebook is the first to show students new to the subject exactly what Roman social history involves, and how they can study it for themselves. After presenting a short history of the development and current position of the discipline, the author discusses the kinds of evidence that can be used, and the full range of resources available. Two case-studies provide practical examples of how to approach sources, and what we can learn from them. Clear, concise and accessible, with all text extracts translated into English, this is the ideal introduction to an increasingly popular subject.
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Economy, Society and Culture

Author: Peter Garnsey,Richard Saller

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520285980

Category: HISTORY

Page: 328

View: 1640

During the Principate (roughly 27 BCE to 235 CE), when the empire reached its maximum extent, Roman society and culture were radically transformed. But how was the vast territory of the empire controlled? Did the demands of central government stimulate economic growth or endanger survival? What forces of cohesion operated to balance the social and economic inequalities and high mortality rates? How did the official religion react in the face of the diffusion of alien cults and the emergence of Christianity? These are some of the many questions posed here, in the new, expanded edition of Garnsey and Saller's pathbreaking account of the economy, society, and culture of the Roman Empire. This second edition includes a new introduction that explores the consequences for government and the governing classes of the replacement of the Republic by the rule of emperors. Addenda to the original chapters offer up-to-date discussions of issues and point to new evidence and approaches that have enlivened the study of Roman history in recent decades. A completely new chapter assesses how far Rome’s subjects resisted her hegemony. The bibliography has also been thoroughly updated, and a new color plate section has been added.
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Author: Beth Severy

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134391838

Category: Family & Relationships

Page: 304

View: 2124

In this lively and detailed study, Beth Severy examines the relationship between the emergence of the Roman Empire and the status and role of this family in Roman society. The family is placed within the social and historical context of the transition from republic to empire, from Augustus' rise to sole power into the early reign of his successor Tiberius. Augustus and the Family at the Birth of the Roman Empire is an outstanding example of how, if we examine "private" issues such as those of family and gender, we gain a greater understanding of "public" concerns such as politics, religion and history. Discussing evidence from sculpture to cults and from monuments to military history, the book pursues the changing lines between public and private, family and state that gave shape to the Roman imperial system.
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Ritual and Meaning in Antiquity

Author: Karen K. Hersch

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521124271

Category: History

Page: 341

View: 3067

This is the first book-length examination of Roman wedding ritual.
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Author: Mary Harlow,Tim G. Parkin

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780748637898

Category: History

Page: 224

View: 2459

What did it feel like to be a member of a Roman family? How different was it being a daughter rather than a son? A husband rather than a wife? What role did grandparents play in the family? Did children matter? How did experiences differ among various classes and geographical areas of the Roman empire over time, especially with the advent of Christianity? This book examines modern debates and controversies that have made up the history of the Roman family. Looking at written texts (literary, epigraphical; and papyrological) and archaeological evidence (ranging from household items to house plans), it examines the interactions of ideals and social realities, and the issues and controversies that surround the history of the Roman family.
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Author: Ken M. Campbell

Publisher: InterVarsity Press

ISBN: 9780830827374

Category: Religion

Page: 284

View: 8234

Ken M. Campbell presents the work of six scholars who map varying understandings of marriage and family in six cultural settings: Victor H. Matthews on the ancient Near East, Daniel I. Block on ancient Israel, S. M. Baugh on Greek society, Susan M. Treggiari on Roman society, David W. Chapman on Second Temple Judaism and Andreas Kstenberger on the New Testament era.
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