Author: Elaine Fantham

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN: 9780199207732

Category: History

Page: 354

View: 6081

The author offers a wide introduction to Cicero's political and cultural world, and illustrates, by analysis of his imaginary dialogue between statesmen, how he introduced the principles of Greek philosophy and rhetoric into Roman education so that his work became the basis of humanist ideals in the Renaissance and Enlightenment.
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Author: Elaine Fantham

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199263159

Category: History

Page: 354

View: 9865

The Roman World of Cicero's De Oratore offers a wide introduction to Cicero's political and cultural world, and illustrates, by its analysis of his imaginary dialogue between statesmen, how he introduced the principles of Greek philosophy and rhetoric into Roman education, so that his work became the basis of humanist ideals in the Renaissance and Enlightenment.
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Author: Elaine Fantham

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 0199263159

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 364

View: 4871

The Roman World of Cicero's De Oratore aims to provide an accessible study of Cicero's first and fullest dialogue, on the ideal orator-statesman. It illustrates the dialogue's achievement as a reflection of a civilized way of life and a brilliantly constructed literary unity, and considers the contribution made by Cicero's recommendations to the development of rhetoric and higher education at Rome. Because Cicero deliberately set his extended conversation in the generationof his childhood teachers, a study of the dialogue in its historical setting can show how the political and cultural life of this earlier period differed from Cicero's personal experience of the collapse of senatorial government, when the overwhelming power of the `first triumvirate' forced him into politicalsilence in the last decade of the republic. After an introductory chapter reviewing Cicero's position on return from exile, chapters include a comparative study of the careers of M. Antonius and L. Licinius Crassus, protagonists of the dialogue, a discussion of Cicero's response to Plato's criticisms of rhetoric in the Gorgias and Phaedrus, and his debt to Aristotle's Rhetoric, analysis of the dialogue's treatment of Roman civil law, existing Latin literature andhistorical writing, Strabo's survey of the sources and application of humour, political eloquence in senate and contio, theories of diction and style, and the techniques of oral delivery. An epilogue looks briefly at Cicero's De re publica and Tacitus' Dialogus de oratoribus as reflections on the transformation of oratory and free(if oligarchic) republican government by debate to meet the context of the new autocracy.
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The Rhetoric of Performance in the Roman World

Author: Erik Gunderson

Publisher: University of Michigan Press

ISBN: 9780472111398

Category: Foreign Language Study

Page: 271

View: 6741

Examines ancient notions of what constitutes a "good man"
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Author: Christopher S. van den Berg

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107020905

Category: History

Page: 354

View: 780

Re-evaluates Tacitus' dialogue about the limits and possibilities of public speech in the Roman Principate.
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Author: C. E. W. Steel

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521509939

Category: History

Page: 422

View: 4081

A comprehensive and authoritative account of one of the greatest and most prolific writers of classical antiquity.
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Author: Marcus Tullius Cicero,David Mankin

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521593603

Category: History

Page: 346

View: 896

The first English commentary on De Oratore in more than a century, examining Book III in depth. This important and influential text deals with the relationship between oratorical style and content, with Cicero expressing his views on the training and qualification of the ideal orator-statesman.
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Political Humor in the Late Roman Republic

Author: Anthony Corbeill

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 1400872898

Category: History

Page: 266

View: 3364

Although numerous scholars have studied Late Republican humor, this is the first book to examine its social and political context. Anthony Corbeill maintains that political abuse exercised real powers of persuasion over Roman audiences and he demonstrates how public humor both creates and enforces a society's norms. Previous scholarship has offered two explanations for why abusive language proliferated in Roman oratory. The first asserts that public rhetoric, filled with extravagant lies, was unconstrained by strictures of propriety. The second contends that invective represents an artifice borrowed from the Greeks. After a fresh reading of all extant literary works from the period, Corbeill concludes that the topics exploited in political invective arise from biases already present in Roman society. The author assesses evidence outside political discourse—from prayer ritual to philosophical speculation to physiognomic texts—in order to locate independently the biases in Roman society that enabled an orator's jokes to persuade. Within each instance of abusive humor—a name pun, for example, or the mockery of a physical deformity—resided values and preconceptions that were essential to the way a Roman citizen of the Late Republic defined himself in relation to his community. Originally published in 1996. The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback and hardcover editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access to the rich scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University Press since its founding in 1905.
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Ciceronian Self-fashioning in the Rhetorical Works

Author: John Richard Dugan

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN: 9780199267804

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 388

View: 4591

Eschewing conventional Roman notions of manliness, Cicero constructs a distinctly aestheticized identity that flirts with the questionable domains of the theatre and the feminine, and thus fashions himself as a 'new man'."--Jacket.
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A Synopsis. Followed by Selected Analytic Studies

Author: M. von Albrecht

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9047401972

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 296

View: 4055

Cicero was speaking like everybody, but better than anybody. Far from confining himself to the so-called 'periodic style', Cicero was a master of a thousand shades. This synopsis, followed by examples, shows in detail, why a study of Cicero's style might be rewarding even today.
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The Generation of the Text

Author: Sarah Culpepper Stroup

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1139488511

Category: History

Page: N.A

View: 2693

This is a study of the emergence, development, and florescence of a distinctly 'late Republican' socio-textual culture as recorded in the writings of this period's two most influential authors, Catullus and Cicero. It reveals a multi-faceted textual - rather than more traditionally defined 'literary' - world that both defines the intellectual life of the late Republic, and lays the foundations for those authors of the Principate and Empire who identified this period as their literary source and inspiration. By first questioning, and then rejecting, the traditional polarisation of Catullus and Cicero, and by broadening the scope of late Republican socio-literary studies to include intersections of language, social practice, and textual materiality, this book presents a fresh picture of both the socio-textual world of the late Republic and the primary authors through whom this world would gain renown.
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Essays and Reflections

Author: Frank W. Walbank

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781139436052

Category: History

Page: N.A

View: 2151

This volume contains nineteen of the more important of Frank Walbank's essays on Polybius and is prefaced by a critical discussion of the main aspects of work done on that author. Several of these essays deal with specific historical problems for which Polybius is a major source. Five deal with Polybius as an historian and three with his attitude towards Rome; one of these raises the question of 'treason' in relation to Polybius and Josephus. Finally, two papers discuss Polybius' later fortunes - in England up to the time of John Dryden and in twentieth-century Italy in the work of Gaetano de Sanctis. Several of these essays originally appeared in journals and collections not always easily accessible, and all students of the ancient Mediterranean world will welcome their assembly within a single volume.
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Author: Brian W. Breed,Elizabeth Keitel,Rex Wallace

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107189551

Category: Foreign Language Study

Page: 320

View: 702

Illuminates the relationships between Lucilius' satires and the Roman world in which he wrote, by combining linguistic and literary approaches.
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Author: Jonathan Zarecki

Publisher: A&C Black

ISBN: 178093470X

Category: History

Page: 208

View: 6486

The resurgence of interest in Cicero's political philosophy in the last twenty years demands a re-evaluation of Cicero's ideal statesman and its relationship not only to Cicero's political theory but also to his practical politics. Jonathan Zarecki proposes three original arguments: firstly, that by the publication of his De Republica in 51 BC Cicero accepted that some sort of return to monarchy was inevitable. Secondly, that Cicero created his model of the ideal statesman as part of an attempt to reconcile the mixed constitution of Rome's past with his belief in the inevitable return of sole-person rule. Thirdly, that the ideal statesman was the primary construct against which Cicero viewed the political and military activities of Pompey, Caesar and Antony, and himself.
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Or, A Dialogue on the Best Style of Speaking

Author: Desiderius Erasmus

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Latin language

Page: 130

View: 5247

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Author: Jacqueline Klooster,Baukje van den Berg

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9004365850

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 394

View: 7897

Homer and the Good Ruler in Antiquity and Beyond focuses on the important question of how and why later authors employ the Homeric epics to reflect on various types and aspects of leadership.
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Roman Response to Greek Literature from Plautus to Statius and Quintilian

Author: Elaine Fantham

Publisher: Walter de Gruyter

ISBN: 3110229331

Category: History

Page: 634

View: 6749

This volume presents closely connected articles by Elaine Fantham which deal with Roman responses to Greek literature on three major subjects: the history and criticism of Latin poetry and rhetoric, women in Roman life and dramatic poetry and the poetic representation of children in relation to their mothers and teachers. The volume discusses among others texts by Plautus, Terence, Cicero, Quintilian, Gellius and Ovid.
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Author: Jill Harries

Publisher: Bristol Classical Press

ISBN: N.A

Category: Foreign Language Study

Page: 240

View: 1806

This book traces Cicero's thought on law as an advocate; as the friend of jurists; as writer on the philosophy of the 'higher law'; and as a politician who both asserted and subverted the rights of citizens under the law. The Roman Republican jurists, hitherto largely neglected by historians, are placed in their intellectual, social and political context. As the institutions of the old Republic collapsed around them, the jurists disputed not only about legal niceties but also about fairness, trust and the rights and duties of the citizen. Although specialists, they were not culturally isolated. In the intensely competitive environment of Republican politics, senatorial jurists competed for office and honours; yet their low-profile activity could not compete with the showy victories of generals or the public performances of such advocates as Cicero. As an advocate, Cicero downplayed the contribution of jurists. But the vicissitudes of his career taught him the importance of Citizen Law as an expression of citizen rights.In the last years of his life he argued for a new integration of jurisprudence with the wider law of the philosopher and the statesman, but he also exploited the philosophy of the 'higher law' to deny 'bad citizens' their rights and to undermine the formal regulation of the Roman state.
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