Author: Andrew Lintott

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 9781444319323

Category: History

Page: 216

View: 8892

Incorporating the most recent scholarship, this book offers a fascinating history of Rome and the Roman peoples during the rule of the first Roman emperor, Augustus. Written in an easily accessible style, making it the ideal introduction to Augustan Rome for those with little previous knowledge Offers compelling insight into the workings of Roman society during this pivotal period in its history Incorporates the most recent scholarship on aspects of Augustus's reign including the armed forces, religion, and intellectual and cultural life Andrew Lintott is a widely respected expert on the Roman Republic
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Author: R M Ogilvie

Publisher: Random House

ISBN: 1446475158

Category: History

Page: 144

View: 2461

To undestand the success of the Romans you must understand their piety. Dionysius of Halicarnassus. For over a thousand years, Roman religion satisfied the spiritual needs of a wide range of peoples throughout the empire, because is offered an intelligent and dignified interpretation of how the world functions. It was a firm, yet tolerant, religion whose adherents committed very few crimes in its name and who were healthily free of neuroses. In this short, perceptive study of Roman religious life between 80 BC and AD 69, Professor Ogilvie shows how intimately involved were the Roman gods with human activities. Drawing widely on original material (all of it quoted in translation), he tells us how the Romans prayed, what happened at a sacrifice, what sort of gods they believed in, and how seriously they took their religion - a religion in which actions, , not dogma, was paramount.
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Author: Paul Zanker

Publisher: University of Michigan Press

ISBN: 9780472081240

Category: Architecture

Page: 385

View: 4183

"Art and architecture are mirrors of a society. They reflect the state of its values, especially in times of crisis or transition." Upon this premise Paul Zanker builds an interpretation of Augustan art as a visual language that both expressed and furthered the transformation of Roman society during the rule of Augustus Caesar. The Power of Images in the Age of Augustus illustrates how the establishment of monarchy under Augustus Caesar led to the creation of a new system of visual imagery that reflects the consciousness of this transitional age.
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Author: Henry Thompson Rowell

Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press

ISBN: 9780806109565

Category: History

Page: 242

View: 352

The great achievements of Augustan Rome are described and evaluated
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Author: Werner Eck

Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell

ISBN: 9781405151498

Category: History

Page: 224

View: 5114

In this updated edition of his concise biography, Werner Eck tells the extraordinary story of Augustus, Rome's first monarch. Incorporates literary, archaeological, and legal sources to provide a vivid narrative of Augustus’ brutal rise to power Written by one of the world’s leading experts on the Roman empire Traces the history of the Roman revolution and Rome’s transformation from a republic to an empire Includes a new chapter on legislation, further information on the monuments of the Augustan period, more maps and illustrations, and a stemma of Augustus’ family Thorough, straightforward, and organized chronologically, this is an ideal resource for anyone approaching the subject for the first time
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The Life of Rome's First Emperor

Author: Anthony Everitt

Publisher: Random House Incorporated

ISBN: 0812970586

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 377

View: 9389

A sweeping biography of Rome's first emperor follows Augustus Caesar as he transformed the Roman Republic into the world's greatest empire, consolidating and expanding Roman power into every aspect of the known world of his time, and examines his life in the context of the world in which he lived. By the author of Cicero. Reprint. 35,000 first printing.
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Author: Anton Powell

Publisher: Bristol Classical Press

ISBN: 9781853995521

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 180

View: 9313

The political aspects of Augustan poetry have attracted much academic interest. The aim of this study is to take account of the effects of Augustan propaganda not only on the work of contemporary Roman writers, but also on the critical tradition itself. The six essays presented in this volume explore the political themes in the work of major poets such as Virgil, Ovid, Horace and Propertius. Using traditional as well as post-structuralist approaches, the essays examine the controversies of the Civil Wars, the emerging issues of treason and free speech and changing representations of Cleopatra and female power.
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Author: Karl Galinsky

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107494567

Category: History

Page: 444

View: 8765

The age of Augustus, commonly dated to 30 BC – AD 14, was a pivotal period in world history. A time of tremendous change in Rome, Italy, and throughout the Mediterranean world, many developments were underway when Augustus took charge and a recurring theme is the role that he played in shaping their direction. The Cambridge Companion to the Age of Augustus captures the dynamics and richness of this era by examining important aspects of political and social history, religion, literature, and art and architecture. The sixteen essays, written by distinguished specialists from the United States and Europe, explore the multi-faceted character of the period and the interconnections between social, religious, political, literary, and artistic developments. Introducing the reader to many of the central issues of the Age of Augustus, the essays also break new ground and will stimulate further research and discussion.
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Introduction to the Life of an Emperor

Author: Karl Galinsky

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521744423

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 200

View: 7465

In this lively and concise biography Karl Galinsky examines Augustus' life from childhood to deification.
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Author: Ramsay MacMullen

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 9780300129908

Category: History

Page: 222

View: 580

During the lifetime of Augustus (from 63 B.C. to A.D. 14), Roman civilization spread at a remarkable rate throughout the ancient world, influencing such areas as art and architecture, religion, law, local speech, city design, clothing, and leisure and family activities. In his newest book, Ramsay MacMullen investigates why the adoption of Roman ways was so prevalent during this period. Drawing largely on archaeological sources, MacMullen discovers that during this period more than half a million Roman veterans were resettled in colonies overseas, and an additional hundred or more urban centers in the provinces took on normal Italian-Roman town constitutions. Great sums of expendable wealth came into the hands of ambitious Roman and local notables, some of which was spent in establishing and advertising Roman ways. MacMullen argues that acculturation of the ancient world was due not to cultural imperialism on the part of the conquerors but to eagerness of imitation among the conquered, and that the Romans were able to respond with surprisingly effective techniques of mass production and standardization.
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Author: Andrew Wallace-Hadrill

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 147253297X

Category: History

Page: 176

View: 1116

Written by Andrew Wallace-Hadrill, one of the world's foremost scholars on Roman social and cultural history, this well-established introduction to Rome in the Age of Augustus provides a fascinating insight into the social and physical contexts of Augustan politics and poetry, exploring in detail the impact of the new regime of government on society. Taking an interpretative approach, the ideas and environment manipulated by Augustus are explored, along with reactions to that manipulation. Emphasising the role and impact of art and architecture of the time, and on Roman attitudes and values, Augustan Rome explains how the victory of Octavian at Actium transformed Rome and Roman life. This thought-provoking yet concise volume sets political changes in the context of their impact on Roman values, on the imaginative world of poetry, on the visual world of art, and on the fabric of the city of Rome.
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Author: Anthony Everitt

Publisher: Random House

ISBN: 9781588368966

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 432

View: 7226

Born in A.D. 76, Hadrian lived through and ruled during a tempestuous era, a time when the Colosseum was opened to the public and Pompeii was buried under a mountain of lava and ash. Acclaimed author Anthony Everitt vividly recounts Hadrian’s thrilling life, in which the emperor brings a century of disorder and costly warfare to a peaceful conclusion while demonstrating how a monarchy can be compatible with good governance. What distinguished Hadrian’s rule, according to Everitt, were two insights that inevitably ensured the empire’s long and prosperous future: He ended Rome’s territorial expansion, which had become strategically and economically untenable, by fortifying her boundaries (the many famed Walls of Hadrian), and he effectively “Hellenized” Rome by anointing Athens the empire’s cultural center, thereby making Greek learning and art vastly more prominent in Roman life. By making splendid use of recently discovered archaeological materials and his own exhaustive research, Everitt sheds new light on one of the most important figures of the ancient world.
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First Emperor of Rome

Author: Adrian Goldsworthy

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 0300178727

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 624

View: 983

Tells the story of the heir to the murdered Julius Caesar who, as Rome's first emperor, brought peace and stability to the empire and presided over a new system of government.
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The Life and Times of Rome's Greatest Politician

Author: Anthony Everitt

Publisher: Random House

ISBN: 1588360342

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 400

View: 6791

“All ages of the world have not produced a greater statesman and philosopher combined.” —John Adams He squared off against Caesar and was friends with young Brutus. He advised the legendary Pompey on his somewhat botched transition from military hero to politician. He lambasted Mark Antony and was master of the smear campaign, as feared for his wit as he was for exposing his opponents’ sexual peccadilloes. Brilliant, voluble, cranky, a genius of political manipulation but also a true patriot and idealist, Cicero was Rome’s most feared politician, one of the greatest lawyers and statesmen of all times. Machiavelli, Queen Elizabeth, John Adams and Winston Churchill all studied his example. No man has loomed larger in the political history of mankind. In this dynamic and engaging biography, Anthony Everitt plunges us into the fascinating, scandal-ridden world of ancient Rome in its most glorious heyday. Accessible to us through his legendary speeches but also through an unrivaled collection of unguarded letters to his close friend Atticus, Cicero comes to life in these pages as a witty and cunning political operator. Cicero leapt onto the public stage at twenty-six, came of age during Spartacus’ famous revolt of the gladiators and presided over Roman law and politics for almost half a century. He foiled the legendary Catiline conspiracy, advised Pompey, the victorious general who brought the Middle East under Roman rule, and fought to mobilize the Senate against Caesar. He witnessed the conquest of Gaul, the civil war that followed and Caesar’s dictatorship and assassination. Cicero was a legendary defender of freedom and a model, later, to French and American revolutionaries who saw themselves as following in his footsteps in their resistance to tyranny. Anthony Everitt’s biography paints a caustic picture of Roman politics—where Senators were endlessly filibustering legislation, walking out, rigging the calendar and exposing one another’s sexual escapades, real or imagined, to discredit their opponents. This was a time before slander and libel laws, and the stories—about dubious pardons, campaign finance scandals, widespread corruption, buying and rigging votes, wife-swapping, and so on—make the Lewinsky affair and the U.S. Congress seem chaste. Cicero was a wily political operator. As a lawyer, he knew no equal. Boastful, often incapable of making up his mind, emotional enough to wander through the woods weeping when his beloved daughter died in childbirth, he emerges in these pages as intensely human, yet he was also the most eloquent and astute witness to the last days of Republican Rome. On Cicero: “He taught us how to think." —Voltaire “I tasted the beauties of language, I breathed the spirit of freedom, and I imbibed from his precepts and examples the public and private sense of a man.” —Edward Gibbon “Who was Cicero: a great speaker or a demagogue?” —Fidel Castro From the Hardcover edition.
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A Brief History with Documents

Author: Ron Mellor

Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan

ISBN: 9781403968050

Category: History

Page: 192

View: 3307

The 45-year reign of Caesar Augustus (31 BCE to 14 CE) marked the creation of the Roman Empire, which would survive in the West for another five centuries. Unlike the rulers who came before him— Pompey, Julius Caesar, and Marc Antony—Augustus maintained nearly absolute power as he established the ideology and institutions of the Pax Romana, which gave the citizens of Rome two centuries of peace and social stability. This collection of primary sources offers multiple viewpoints of the rise, achievements, and legacy of Augustus and his empire. Ronald Mellor’s fluid introduction parallels the organization of the documents that follow to provide students with the historical context necessary for exploring these translations of ancient texts. Document headnotes, a list of literary sources for the Age of Augustus, a glossary of Greek and Latin terms, a chronology, questions for consideration, and a selected bibliography offer additional pedagogical support and encourage students to analyze the reign that transformed the history of Europe and the Mediterranean basin.
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Author: Paul Zanker

Publisher: Getty Publications

ISBN: 1606061011

Category: Art

Page: 214

View: 9604

Traditional studies of Roman art have sought to identify an indigenous style distinct from Greek art and in the process have neglected the large body of Roman work that creatively recycled Greek artworks. Now available in paperback, this fresh reassessment offers instead a cultural history of the functions of the visual arts, the messages that these images carried, and the values that they affirmed in late Republican Rome and the Empire. The analysis begins at the point at which the characteristic features of Roman art started to emerge, when the Romans were exposed to Hellenistic culture through their conquest of Greek lands in the third century B.C. As a result, the values and social and political structure of Roman society changed, as did the functions and character of the images it generated. This volume, presented in very clear and accessible language, offers new and fascinating insights into the evolution of the forms and meanings of Roman art. "Zanker, one of the foremost ancient Roman art historians, has produced an excellent general study of Roman art and its reception. . . . This book would be ideal for students at all levels interested in Roman art, history, and culture."—Choice
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the story of imperial Rome from Julius Caesar to the last emperor

Author: David Potter

Publisher: Quercus Books

ISBN: N.A

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 256

View: 5465

Charting the 500 years that followed the triumph of Augustus, this book profiles the greatest and most notorious of the emperors. All the key events of the Roman imperial history are described here, from the Golden Age of Augustus to the destruction of Pompeli, from the reorganization of the Empire under Diocletion in 284 to the division of the Empire into Eastern and Western halves in 395, and from Constantine's Edict of Milan of 313 to the sack of Rome by the Visigoths in 410. Contains 150 color images.
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The Life and Times of Rome's Greatest Emperor

Author: Simon T. Bailey

Publisher: CreateSpace

ISBN: 9781517393250

Category:

Page: 254

View: 9884

Augustus, born Gaius Octavious Thurinus in 63 BCE, was the first emperor of Rome. From the moment his great uncle and adoptive father, Julius Caesar, died when he was eighteen, his life was one action-packed conflict after another. From the unexpected inheritance of a hefty fortune and a heap of responsibilities, to fighting off a foe who should be a friend, to seeking revenge on Caesar's assassins, he had his work cut out for him. Throw in an affair with a beautiful woman who happened to be pregnant and married to an aristocrat, an unruly daughter, and roomful of Senators who just didn't know how to get things done, and you've got one heck of a life. Augustus succeeded at many things during his nearly forty-year run as the leader of the Roman world. He reinvented the skyline of Rome, had the sewer system cleaned out and made to function, conquered Egypt and routed their plentiful grain to a starving Roman Empire, and promoted traditional Roman family values-not to be confused with traditional modern American or Western European family values-by giving attractive benefits to those who got married and had multiple children. Along with revitalizing the city, Augustus sought to promote great writers like Virgil and Horace and encourage a renewal of religious piety. Changing laws was easy enough, but changing hearts proved to be a rather difficult matter. In his book entitled Augustus: The Life And Times Of Rome's Greatest Emperor author Simon T. Bailey brilliantly captures the true essence of Augustus as well as the time period in which he ruled in ancient Rome.
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Author: Mary Beard

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN: 1631491253

Category: History

Page: 512

View: 3703

A sweeping, revisionist history of the Roman Empire from one of our foremost classicists. Ancient Rome was an imposing city even by modern standards, a sprawling imperial metropolis of more than a million inhabitants, a "mixture of luxury and filth, liberty and exploitation, civic pride and murderous civil war" that served as the seat of power for an empire that spanned from Spain to Syria. Yet how did all this emerge from what was once an insignificant village in central Italy? In S.P.Q.R., world-renowned classicist Mary Beard narrates the unprecedented rise of a civilization that even two thousand years later still shapes many of our most fundamental assumptions about power, citizenship, responsibility, political violence, empire, luxury, and beauty. From the foundational myth of Romulus and Remus to 212 ce—nearly a thousand years later—when the emperor Caracalla gave Roman citizenship to every free inhabitant of the empire, S.P.Q.R. (the abbreviation of "The Senate and People of Rome") examines not just how we think of ancient Rome but challenges the comfortable historical perspectives that have existed for centuries by exploring how the Romans thought of themselves: how they challenged the idea of imperial rule, how they responded to terrorism and revolution, and how they invented a new idea of citizenship and nation. Opening the book in 63 bce with the famous clash between the populist aristocrat Catiline and Cicero, the renowned politician and orator, Beard animates this “terrorist conspiracy,” which was aimed at the very heart of the Republic, demonstrating how this singular event would presage the struggle between democracy and autocracy that would come to define much of Rome’s subsequent history. Illustrating how a classical democracy yielded to a self-confident and self-critical empire, S.P.Q.R. reintroduces us, though in a wholly different way, to famous and familiar characters—Hannibal, Julius Caesar, Cleopatra, Augustus, and Nero, among others—while expanding the historical aperture to include those overlooked in traditional histories: the women, the slaves and ex-slaves, conspirators, and those on the losing side of Rome’s glorious conquests. Like the best detectives, Beard sifts fact from fiction, myth and propaganda from historical record, refusing either simple admiration or blanket condemnation. Far from being frozen in marble, Roman history, she shows, is constantly being revised and rewritten as our knowledge expands. Indeed, our perceptions of ancient Rome have changed dramatically over the last fifty years, and S.P.Q.R., with its nuanced attention to class inequality, democratic struggles, and the lives of entire groups of people omitted from the historical narrative for centuries, promises to shape our view of Roman history for decades to come.
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