A New History

Author: James J. O'Donnell

Publisher: Harper Collins

ISBN: 0061982466

Category: History

Page: 448

View: 9997

The dream Alexander the Great and Julius Caesar shared of uniting Europe, the Medi-terranean, and the Middle East in a single community shuddered and then collapsed in the wars and disasters of the sixth century. Historian and classicist James J. O'Donnell—who last brought readers his masterful, disturbing, and revelatory biography of Saint Augustine—revisits this old story in a fresh way, bringing home its sometimes painful relevance to today's issues. With unexpected detail and in his hauntingly vivid style, O'Donnell begins at a time of apparent Roman revival and brings readers to the moment of imminent collapse that just preceded the rise of Islam. Illegal migrations of peoples, religious wars, global pandemics, and the temptations of empire: Rome's end foreshadows today's crises and offers hints how to navigate them—if present leaders will heed this story.
Read More

A New History

Author: James J. O'Donnell

Publisher: Harper Collins

ISBN: 0060787376

Category: History

Page: 436

View: 9182

Recounts the sixth-century events and circumstances that led to the fall of the Roman Empire.
Read More

A New History

Author: James J. O'Donnell

Publisher: Ecco

ISBN: 9780060787417

Category: History

Page: 448

View: 1956

The dream Alexander the Great and Julius Caesar shared of uniting Europe, the Medi-terranean, and the Middle East in a single community shuddered and then collapsed in the wars and disasters of the sixth century. Historian and classicist James J. O'Donnell—who last brought readers his masterful, disturbing, and revelatory biography of Saint Augustine—revisits this old story in a fresh way, bringing home its sometimes painful relevance to today's issues. With unexpected detail and in his hauntingly vivid style, O'Donnell begins at a time of apparent Roman revival and brings readers to the moment of imminent collapse that just preceded the rise of Islam. Illegal migrations of peoples, religious wars, global pandemics, and the temptations of empire: Rome's end foreshadows today's crises and offers hints how to navigate them—if present leaders will heed this story.
Read More

The Drawings of French Architects who Won the Prix de Rome, 1786-1924

Author: Roberto Cassanelli

Publisher: Getty Publications

ISBN: 9780892366804

Category: Architecture

Page: 223

View: 7432

Presents almost two hundred reproductions of the 19th-century architect pennsionnaires of the Academie Francaise de Rome who, as students, won the prestigious Prix de Rome, offering watercolors and drawings of Pompeii's structures as they were excavated at the time.
Read More

An Archaeological Perspective

Author: James Gerrard

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107038634

Category: History

Page: 361

View: 804

Employs new archaeological and historical evidence to explain how and why Roman Britain became Anglo-Saxon England.
Read More

Author: Edward Gibbon

Publisher: Palala Press

ISBN: 9781357555207

Category:

Page: 482

View: 1315

This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work was reproduced from the original artifact, and remains as true to the original work as possible. Therefore, you will see the original copyright references, library stamps (as most of these works have been housed in our most important libraries around the world), and other notations in the work.This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work.As a reproduction of a historical artifact, this work may contain missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, reproduced, and made generally available to the public. We appreciate your support of the preservation process, and thank you for being an important part of keeping this knowledge alive and relevant.
Read More

The Lost Cities of the Roman Empire

Author: Ginette di Vita-Evrard

Publisher: Konemann

ISBN: N.A

Category: Architecture

Page: 256

View: 2203

Brings to life a group of Greco-Roman cities long lost under the desert sands of North Africa. The discoveries of these sites offer a unique view of both Africa and the Greco-Roman world.
Read More

The Rise and Fall of an Ancient Civilization

Author: Richard Miles

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 9781101517031

Category: History

Page: 544

View: 329

The first full-scale history of Hannibal's Carthage in decades and "a convincing and enthralling narrative." (The Economist ) Drawing on a wealth of new research, archaeologist, historian, and master storyteller Richard Miles resurrects the civilization that ancient Rome struggled so mightily to expunge. This monumental work charts the entirety of Carthage's history, from its origins among the Phoenician settlements of Lebanon to its apotheosis as a Mediterranean empire whose epic land-and-sea clash with Rome made a legend of Hannibal and shaped the course of Western history. Carthage Must Be Destroyed reintroduces readers to the ancient glory of a lost people and their generations-long struggle against an implacable enemy.
Read More

The Fall of the Emperor Nero and His City

Author: Stephen Dando-Collins

Publisher: Da Capo Press

ISBN: 0306819333

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 8535

On the night of July 19, AD 64, a fire began beneath the stands of Rome's great stadium, the Circus Maximus. For more than a week the fire spread, engulfing most of the city and nearly burning it to the ground. With its capital in ruins, Rome's powerful empire teetered on the edge of collapse as Nero struggled desperately to save his empire…and his skin. In The Great Fire of Rome, Dando-Collins takes readers through the streets of ancient Rome, where unrest simmers, and into the imperial palace, where political intrigue seethes, relating a pot-boiler story filled with fascinating historical characters who will determine the course of an empire. It is an unforgettable human drama that brings ancient Rome and the momentous events of 64 AD scorchingly to life.
Read More

The Emperor Who Brought It Down, The Barbarians Who Could Have Saved It

Author: James J O'Donnell

Publisher: Profile Books

ISBN: 1847653960

Category: History

Page: 768

View: 2610

What really marked the end of the Roman Empire? James O'Donnell's magnificent new book takes us back to the sixth century and the last time the Empire could be regarded as a single community. Two figures dominate his narrative - Theodoric the 'barbarian', whose civilized rule in Italy with his philosopher minister Boethius might have been an inspiration, and in Constantinople Justinian, who destroyed the Empire with his rigid passion for orthodoxy and his restless inability to secure his frontiers with peace. The book closes with Pope Gregory the Great, the polished product of ancient Roman schools, presiding over a Rome in ruins.
Read More

Author: Rita J. Markel

Publisher: Twenty-First Century Books

ISBN: 1467703788

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 139

View: 7499

Can the demise of a government 1,500 years ago have repercussions felt around the globe centuries later? If that government is the powerful Roman Empire, it can. From first century B.C. through fifth century A.D., the Romans ruled over an empire that stretched across much of Europe, the Middle East, and North Africa. Then in 476, a leader from a Germanic group called the Goths overthrew the Roman Emperor. To this day, questions still exist about how such a powerful empire could have been destroyed. Roman culture, language, and technology had great influence on all areas under the empire's control. After the fall, Europe entered the early Middle Ages, a period of fragmentation characterized by a decline in trade, learning, and artistic achievement. The rise—and fall—of the Roman Empire are one of world history's most pivotal moments.
Read More

An Oxford Archaeological Guide

Author: Amanda Claridge,Judith Toms,Tony Cubberley

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199546835

Category: History

Page: 540

View: 5040

The ultimate guide to all the important archaeological sites in the city of Rome from the period 800 BC to AD 600, with over 200 site maps, plans, and photographs, covering everything from the Colosseum to the Catacombs and including an introduction that offers essential background to the culture and history of ancient Rome, information about museums and opening times, a chronology for reference, and comprehensive glossaries of essential terms. For this newedition the original text has been extensively revised, adding over 20 more sites and illustrations, the itineraries have been re-organized and expanded to suit the many changes that have taken place in thepast decade, and the practical information and references have been fully updated.
Read More

the slow death of the Roman superpower

Author: Adrian Keith Goldsworthy

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 531

View: 7262

The Fall of the Roman Empire has been a best-selling subject since the 18th century. Since then over 200 discrete reasons have been advanced for the collapse of the western half of the Roman empire. Until very recently, the academic view downplayed the death and destruction, to spin a positive story of the 'world of late antiquity'. Barbarian invasions are described in neutral language: the movement of peoples. It is all painfully 'politically correct'. Now Adrian Goldsworthy comes forward with his trademark combination of clear narrative, common sense, and a thorough mastery of the sources. In telling the story from beginning to end, he rescues the era from the mealy-mouthed and diffident: this is a red-blooded account of barbarian invasions, palace coups, scheming courtiers and corrupt emperors who set the gold standard for dissipation. It is 'old fashioned history' in the best sense: an accessible narrative with colourful characters whose story reveals the true reasons for the fall of Rome.
Read More

Author: John Henry Clay

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781444761375

Category:

Page: 464

View: 3723

A.D. 448. The Roman Empire is crumbling. The Emperor is weak. Countless Romans live under the rule of barbarian kings. Politicians scheme and ambitious generals vie for power. Then from the depths of Germany arises an even darker threat: Attila, King of the Huns, gathering his hordes and determined to crush Rome once and for all. In a time of danger and deception, where every smile conceals betrayal and every sleeve a dagger, three young people hold onto the dream that Rome can be made great once more. But as their fates collide, they find themselves forced to survive in a world more deadly than any of them could ever have imagined. What can they possibly do to save the Empire, or themselves, from destruction?
Read More

Climate, Disease, and the End of an Empire

Author: Kyle Harper

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 1400888913

Category: History

Page: 440

View: 2559

A sweeping new history of how climate change and disease helped bring down the Roman Empire Here is the monumental retelling of one of the most consequential chapters of human history: the fall of the Roman Empire. The Fate of Rome is the first book to examine the catastrophic role that climate change and infectious diseases played in the collapse of Rome’s power—a story of nature’s triumph over human ambition. Interweaving a grand historical narrative with cutting-edge climate science and genetic discoveries, Kyle Harper traces how the fate of Rome was decided not just by emperors, soldiers, and barbarians but also by volcanic eruptions, solar cycles, climate instability, and devastating viruses and bacteria. He takes readers from Rome’s pinnacle in the second century, when the empire seemed an invincible superpower, to its unraveling by the seventh century, when Rome was politically fragmented and materially depleted. Harper describes how the Romans were resilient in the face of enormous environmental stress, until the besieged empire could no longer withstand the combined challenges of a “little ice age” and recurrent outbreaks of bubonic plague. A poignant reflection on humanity’s intimate relationship with the environment, The Fate of Rome provides a sweeping account of how one of history’s greatest civilizations encountered and endured, yet ultimately succumbed to the cumulative burden of nature’s violence. The example of Rome is a timely reminder that climate change and germ evolution have shaped the world we inhabit—in ways that are surprising and profound.
Read More

The Roman Conquest of Greece

Author: Robin Waterfield

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 0199916896

Category: History

Page: 287

View: 5954

Chronicles Rome's policies in the Greek East, which began as self-rule so that the Empire could focus on the Carthaginian menace in the West, but later moved to more direct control several decades later.
Read More

The Christian Destruction of the Classical World

Author: Catherine Nixey

Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

ISBN: 0544800931

Category: History

Page: 384

View: 3246

A bold new history of the rise of Christianity, showing how its radical followers ravaged vast swathes of classical culture, plunging the world into an era of dogma and intellectual darkness “Searingly passionate…Nixey writes up a storm. Each sentence is rich, textured, evocative, felt…[A] ballista-bolt of a book.” —New York Times Book Review In Harran, the locals refused to convert. They were dismembered, their limbs hung along the town’s main street. In Alexandria, zealots pulled the elderly philosopher-mathematician Hypatia from her chariot and flayed her to death with shards of broken pottery. Not long before, their fellow Christians had invaded the city’s greatest temple and razed it—smashing its world-famous statues and destroying all that was left of Alexandria’s Great Library. Today, we refer to Christianity’s conquest of the West as a “triumph.” But this victory entailed an orgy of destruction in which Jesus’s followers attacked and suppressed classical culture, helping to pitch Western civilization into a thousand-year-long decline. Just one percent of Latin literature would survive the purge; countless antiquities, artworks, and ancient traditions were lost forever. As Catherine Nixey reveals, evidence of early Christians’ campaign of terror has been hiding in plain sight: in the palimpsests and shattered statues proudly displayed in churches and museums the world over. In The Darkening Age, Nixey resurrects this lost history, offering a wrenching account of the rise of Christianity and its terrible cost.
Read More

How the Murder of Germanicus Led to the Fall of Rome

Author: Stephen Dando-Collins

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 047013741X

Category: History

Page: 273

View: 7640

Describes how the assassination of Germanicus Caesar, one of ancient Rome's greatest heroes, the grandson of Mark Antony, brother of Claudius, father of Caligula, and grandfather of Nero, set the stage for a brutal series of events that eventually led to the fall of Rome, in a study that investigates this ancient murder mystery.
Read More

The End of Traditional Religion and the Rise of Christianity

Author: James J. O'Donnell

Publisher: Harper Collins

ISBN: 0062370715

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 4392

A provocative and contrarian religious history that charts the rise of Christianity from the point of view of traditional” religion from the religious scholar and critically acclaimed author of Augustine. Pagans explores the rise of Christianity from a surprising and unique viewpoint: that of the people who witnessed their ways of life destroyed by what seemed then a powerful religious cult. These “pagans” were actually pious Greeks, Romans, Syrians, and Gauls who observed the traditions of their ancestors. To these devout polytheists, Christians who worshipped only one deity were immoral atheists who believed that a splash of water on the deathbed could erase a lifetime of sin. Religious scholar James J. O’Donnell takes us on a lively tour of the Ancient Roman world through the fourth century CE, when Romans of every nationality, social class, and religious preference found their world suddenly constrained by rulers who preferred a strange new god. Some joined this new cult, while others denied its power, erroneously believing it was little more than a passing fad. In Pagans, O’Donnell brings to life various pagan rites and essential features of Roman religion and life, offers fresh portraits of iconic historical figures, including Constantine, Julian, and Augustine, and explores important themes—Rome versus the east, civilization versus barbarism, plurality versus unity, rich versus poor, and tradition versus innovation—in this startling account.
Read More