Author: Steven Kautz,Arthur Melzer,Jerry Weinberger,M. Richard Zinman

Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

ISBN: 9780812206074

Category: Law

Page: 328

View: 4986

From Brown v. Board of Education to Roe v. Wade to Bush v. Gore, the Supreme Court has, over the past fifty years, assumed an increasingly controversial place in American national political life. As the recurring struggles over nominations to the Court illustrate, few questions today divide our political community more profoundly than those concerning the Court's proper role as protector of liberties and guardian of the Constitution. If the nation is today in the midst of a "culture war," the contest over the Supreme Court is certainly one of its principal battlefields. In this volume, distinguished constitutional scholars aim to move debate beyond the sound bites that divide the opposing parties to more fundamental discussions about the nature of constitutionalism. Toward this end, the volume includes chapters on the philosophical and historical origins of the idea of constitutionalism; on theories of constitutionalism in American history in particular; on the practices of constitutionalism around the globe; and on the parallel emergence of—and the persistent tensions between—constitutionalism and democracy throughout the modern world. In democracies, the primary point of having a constitution is to place some matters beyond politics and partisan contest. And yet it seems equally clear that constitutionalism of this kind results in a struggle over the meaning or proper interpretation of the constitution, a struggle that is itself deeply political. Although the volume represents a variety of viewpoints and approaches, this struggle, which is the central paradox of constitutionalism, is the ultimate theme of all the essays.
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Author: Gary L. McDowell

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521140919

Category: Law

Page: 409

View: 4041

"In this fine book, Gary McDowell shows that the Constitution is our fundamental law---not our master, but our guide and mentor. Only at our peril do we try to make it our servant."---Harvey Mansfield, Harvard University "Erudite and lucid: McDowell's book is a must-read for those who wish to understand the philosophical and linguistic roots of the originalist tradition of constitutional interpretation."-R. Kent Newmyer, University of Connecticut School of Law "This book adds a major dimension of depth to the case for guiding judicial interpretation of the Constitution by the original intent of the framers. McDowell articulates a deeply thought-provoking meditation, informed by a fertile understanding of key foundations for originalism articulated by major figures in political philosophy, in the common law, and among the Founders themselves who shaped the theorizing that informs our constitutional order."---Thomas Pangle, University of Texas at Austin "For several decades, Gary McDowell has been one of our most brilliant and learned students of law and political philosophy. This book is his summa, a profound defense of originalism as a moral Constitutional philosophy, a brilliant discourse on the framers and their philosophical forbears and successors, and a powerful handbook of strategy in what McDowell calls `the contemporary war for the Constitution.'This work is essential reading for anyone who cares about the Supreme Court and the Constitution, but it is more. It is, simply stated, one of this generation's most important contributions toward preserving the rule of law itself."---Stephen Presser, Northwestern University School of Law "In this timely book, the case against the so-called `living' constitution is so powerfully argued and so clearly presented that it cannot be ignored."---Gordon S. Wood, Brown University
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Author: Sujit Choudhry,Madhav Khosla,Pratap Bhanu Mehta

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0198704895

Category: Law

Page: 1048

View: 9811

As the first major post-colonial constitution, the Indian Constitution holds particular importance for the study of constitutional law and constitutions. Providing a thorough historical and political grounding, this Handbook examines key debates and developments in Indian constitutionalism and creates a framework for further study.
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Obergefell v. Hodges and U.S. v. Windsor in Context

Author: Patrick N. Cain,David Ramsey

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 149852818X

Category: Law

Page: 240

View: 8002

This volume examines the Supreme Court’s rulings in U.S. v. Windsor and Obergefell v. Hodges in light of its earlier rulings while also incorporating several prominent accounts of marriage and the family from the history of political philosophy.
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Popular Constitutionalism and Judicial Review

Author: Larry D. Kramer,Larry Kramer

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 9780195306453

Category: Law

Page: 363

View: 9577

Examines the distinct difference between how the people and the founding fathers viewed the new Constitution and how it is interpreted over two hundred years later and maintains that originally the people were the ones responsible for seeing that its concepts were properly implemented.
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Author: Bradford P. Wilson,Ken Masugi

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 9780847686599

Category: Law

Page: 298

View: 2617

In this important book, fourteen of America's leading constitutional scholars assess the Supreme Court's performance expounding the animating principles of American constitutionalism. Essays devoted to fresh examination of the Supreme Court's jurisprudence with respect to the Necessary and Proper Clause, the Commerce Clause, federalism, the common law, international law and national sovereignty, separation of powers, fundamental rights, term limits, and constitutional criminal procedure. Other essays evaluate the work of the Court as "republican school master", analyzing how the Court has articulated and affected the American people's capacity for self-government, the principle of the rule of law, the historic burden of racial injustice, respect for limited constitutional government, and the civilizational distinction between liberty and license. The Supreme Court and American Constitutionalism will be of great value to students and scholars of American constitutional studies, constitutional law, and American government.
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popular constitutionalism and judicial review

Author: Larry Kramer

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 9780195169188

Category: Fiction

Page: 363

View: 2299

The United States Constitution is the foundation of the longest and most successful democratic experiment in modern human history. It serves not only as legal bedrock for the world's most powerful nation-state, but also, more broadly, it reflects that nation's fundamental aspirations and commitments as a society. Who then has the authority to interpret a blueprint of such extraordinary influence? Americans have come to treat the Constitution as something beyond their competence, something whose meaning should be decided by judges, assisted by a cadre of trained lawyers and academics. Yet this submission to a lawyerly elite is a radical and troublesome departure from what was originally the case. For America's founding generation celebrated the central role of "the people" in supplying government with its energy and direction. In this groundbreaking interpretation of America's founding and its concept of constitutionalism, Larry Kramer reveals how the first generations of Americans fought for and gave birth to a very different system from our current one and held a very different understanding of citizenship from that of most Americans today. "Popular sovereignty" was more than an empty abstraction, more than a mythic philosophical justification for government, and the idea of "the people" was more than a flip rhetorical gesture to be used on the campaign trail. Ordinary Americans exercised active control and sovereignty over their Constitution. The constitutionality of governmental action met with vigorous public debate in struggles whose outcomes might be greeted with celebratory feasts and bonfires, or with belligerent resistance. The Constitution remained, fundamentally, an act of popular will: the people's charter, made by the people. And it was "the people themselves" who were responsible for seeing that it was properly interpreted and implemented. With this book, Larry Kramer vaults to the forefront of constitutional theory and interpretation. In the process, he rekindles the original spark of "We, the People," inviting every citizen to join him in reclaiming the Constitution's legacy as, in Franklin D. Roosevelt's words, "a layman's instrument of government" and not "a lawyer's contract."
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Author: Richard H. Fallon

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 0674975812

Category: Constitutional law

Page: 240

View: 2060

"The book addresses questions about the roles of law and politics and the challenge of legitimacy in constitutional adjudication in the Supreme Court. With all sophisticated observers recognizing that the Justices' political outlooks influence their decision making, many political scientists, some of the public, and a few prominent judges have become Cynical Realists. In their view Justices vote based on their policy preferences, and legal reasoning is mere window-dressing. This book rejects Cynical Realism, but without denying many Realist insights. It explains the limits of language and history in resolving contentious constitutional issues. To rescue the notion that the Constitution is law that binds the Justices, the book provides an original account of what law is and means in the Supreme Court. It also offers a theory of legitimacy in Supreme Court adjudication. Given the nature of law in the Supreme Court, we need to accept and learn to respect reasonable disagreement about many constitutional issues. If so, the legitimacy question becomes: how would the Justices need to decide cases so that even those who disagree with the outcomes ought to respect the Justices' processes of decision? The book gives a fresh and counterintuitive answer to that vital question. Adapting a methodology made famous by John Rawls, it argues that the Justices should strive to achieve a "reflective equilibrium" between their interpretive principles, framed to identify the Constitution's enduring meaning, and their judgments about appropriate outcomes in particular cases, evaluated as prescriptions for the nation to live by in the future. The book blends the perspectives of law, philosophy, and political science to answer theoretical and practical questions of pressing national importance"--
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Author: Sotirios A. Barber

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Law

Page: 279

View: 6260

Barber shows that New Right theorists, such as Bork, and establishment liberals, such as Ronald Dworkin, are moral relativists who cannot escape conclusions ("might makes right," for example) that could destroy constitutionalism in America. The best hope for American freedoms, Barber argues, is to revive classical constitutionalism - and he explains how new movements in philosophy today allow the Court's friends to do just that. Written in a lively and engaging style.
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Author: Sujit Choudhry

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781139460774

Category: Law

Page: N.A

View: 826

The migration of constitutional ideas across jurisdictions is one of the central features of contemporary constitutional practice. The increasing use of comparative jurisprudence in interpreting constitutions is one example of this. In this 2007 book, leading figures in the study of comparative constitutionalism and comparative constitutional politics from North America, Europe and Australia discuss the dynamic processes whereby constitutional systems influence each other. They explore basic methodological questions which have thus far received little attention, and examine the complex relationship between national and supranational constitutionalism - an issue of considerable contemporary interest in Europe. The migration of constitutional ideas is discussed from a variety of methodological perspectives - comparative law, comparative politics, and cultural studies of law - and contributors draw on case-studies from a wide variety of jurisdictions: Australia, Hungary, India, South Africa, the United Kingdom, the United States, and Canada.
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Author: Marco Goldoni,Christopher McCorkindale

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 1847319327

Category: Law

Page: 382

View: 1770

This book fills a major gap in the ever-increasing secondary literature on Hannah Arendt's political thought by providing a dedicated and coherent treatment of the many, various and interesting things which Arendt had to say about law. Often obscured by more pressing or more controversial aspects of her work, Arendt nonetheless had interesting insights into Greek and Roman concepts of law, human rights, constitutional design, legislation, sovereignty, international tribunals, judicial review and much more. This book retrieves these aspects of her legal philosophy for the attention of both Arendt scholars and lawyers alike. The book brings together lawyers as well as Arendt scholars drawn from a range of disciplines (philosophy, political science, international relations), who have engaged in an internal debate the dynamism of which is captured in print. Following the editors' introduction, the book is split into four Parts: Part I explores the concept of law in Arendt's thought; Part II explores legal aspects of Arendt's constitutional thought: first locating Arendt in the wider tradition of republican constitutionalism, before turning attention to the role of courts and the role of parliament in her constitutional design. In Part III Arendt's thought on international law is explored from a variety of perspectives, covering international institutions and international criminal law, as well as the theoretical foundations of international law. Part IV debates the foundations, content and meaning of Arendt's famous and influential claim that the 'right to have rights' is the one true human right.
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Author: Alexander Hamilton,James Madison,John Jay

Publisher: C.H.Beck

ISBN: 9783406547546

Category: Constitutional history

Page: 583

View: 9629

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From the Missouri Compromise to the Age of Jackson

Author: Paul Finkelman,Donald R. Kennon

Publisher: Ohio University Press

ISBN: 0821417835

Category: History

Page: 293

View: 6993

Offers a look at events that inspired the movement toward secession and the Civil War through acts of sectionalism in the early 1800s, with essays dealing with the plight of American Indians, slavery, and the actual concept of American democracy itself.
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Author: Georg Nolte

Publisher: Council of Europe

ISBN: 9287157138

Category: Constitutional law

Page: 254

View: 4908

This book compiles the papers and comments delivered at the Confârence on "European and American constitutionaism" which took place in Gèttingen in 2003. Through topics like freedom of speech, human dignity, the protective function of the state, adjudication and democracy and international influences, the conference papers identify salient features of the constitutional systems on both sides of the Atlantic and address recent developments following the end of the soviet era in eastern Europe and the terrorists attacks of 11 September 2001.
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What Constitutions Do

Author: Cass R. Sunstein

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN: 9780195158403

Category: Law

Page: 280

View: 9401

A fresh examination of constitutionalism is presented by one of the nation's most respected legal scholars.
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From Theory to Politics

Author: Stephen M. Griffin

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 9781400822126

Category: Law

Page: 228

View: 8910

Despite the outpouring of works on constitutional theory in the past several decades, no general introduction to the field has been available. Stephen Griffin provides here an original contribution to American constitutional theory in the form of a short, lucid introduction to the subject for scholars and an informed lay audience. He surveys in an unpolemical way the theoretical issues raised by judicial practice in the United States over the past three centuries, particularly since the Warren Court, and locates both theory and practices that have inspired dispute among jurists and scholars in historical context. At the same time he advances an argument about the distinctive nature of our American constitutionalism, regarding it as an instance of the interpenetration of law and politics. American Constitutionalism is unique in considering the perspectives of both law and political science in relation to constitutional theory. Constitutional theories produced by legal scholars do not usually discuss state-centered theories of American politics, the importance of institutions, behaviorist research on judicial decision making, or questions of constitutional reform, but this book takes into account the political science literature on these and other topics. The work also devotes substantial attention to judicial review and its relationship to American democracy and theories of constitutional interpretation.
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America, Poland, and France : a Bicentennial Colloquium at the Miller Center

Author: Kenneth W. Thompson,Rett R. Ludwikowski

Publisher: University Press of Amer

ISBN: N.A

Category: Law

Page: 185

View: 8714

"A bicentennial colloquium at the Miller Center."--T.p.
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On Skepticism and Constitutionalism

Author: James W. Vice

Publisher: Rodopi

ISBN: 9789042005112

Category: Social Science

Page: 274

View: 3904

The Reopening of the American Mind: On Skepticism and Constitutionalism explores the connection of moderate skepticism with attachment to constitutionalism through the thought of five writers. The features of this skepticism were concisely delineated by James Madison in the 37th Federalist as a recognition of the complexity of political matters, the limitations of human reason, and the shortcomings of language. The position was first articulated by Cicero who connected it with the idea of a mixed or republican constitution developed by trial and error over generations. Cicero was influential in the world of David Hume, Edmund Burke, and Madison. The skeptical/constitutional connection found its most articulate recent advocate in Supreme Court Justice Felix Frankfurter and underlay his advocacy of judicial restraint.Current events have revived interest in the primacy of the legislative branch in balancing interests and rights, in the States as laboratories for democracy, and in an experimental approach to the solution of social problems in what might be called a reopening of the American mind. The five central chapters explore the skeptical/constitutional connection and the spirit of moderation in these political thinkers. Without an appreciation of this tradition of avoiding dogmatism, people will continue to demand simple answers to complex problems. The book is not, however, primarily a tract for the times but a reflection on the on-going search for a more civil world.
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zu einem Dialog unter Abwesenden : mit Leo Strauss' Aufsatz über den "Begriff des Politischen" und drei unveröffentlichten Briefen an Carl Schmitt aus den Jahren 1932/33

Author: Heinrich Meier

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Political science

Page: 141

View: 6908

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