A Functional Reconsideration of the Role of the Supreme Court

Author: Jesse H. Choper

Publisher: Quid Pro Books

ISBN: 1610271718

Category: Political Science

Page: 494

View: 1240

As constitutional scholar John Nowak noted when the book was first released, "Professor Choper's Judicial Review and the National Political Process is mandatory reading for anyone seriously attempting to study our constitutional system of government. It is an important assessment of the democratic process and the theoretical and practical role of the Supreme Court." That view is no less true today, as borne out by the countless citations to this landmark work over the decades, including scores in the last few years alone. It is simply part of the foundational canon of constitutional law and political theory, an essential part of the library of scholars, students, and educated readers interested in considering the hard choices inherent in what the courts should decide and how they should decide them.
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Author: John Agresto

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN: 150171290X

Category: Law

Page: 184

View: 3433

In The Supreme Court and Constitutional Democracy John Agresto traces the development of American judicial power, paying close attention to what he views as the very real threat of judicial supremacy. Agresto examines the role of the judiciary in a democratic society and discusses the proper place of congressional power in constitutional issues. Agresto argues that while the separation of congressional and judicial functions is a fundamental tenet of American government, the present system is not effective in maintaining an appropriate balance of power. He shows that continued judicial expansion, especially into the realm of public policy, might have severe consequences for America's national life and direction, and offers practical recommendations for safeguarding against an increasingly powerful Supreme Court. John Agresto's controversial argument, set in the context of a historical and theoretical inquiry, will be of great interest to scholars and students in political science and law, especially American constitutional law and political theory. 02 In The Supreme Court and Constitutional Democracy John Agresto traces the development of American judicial power, paying close attention to what he views as the very real threat of judicial supremacy. Agresto examines the role of the judiciary in a... In The Supreme Court and Constitutional Democracy John Agresto traces the development of American judicial power, paying close attention to what he views as the very real threat of judicial supremacy. Agresto examines the role of the judiciary in a democratic society and discusses the proper place of congressional power in constitutional issues. Agresto argues that while the separation of congressional and judicial functions is a fundamental tenet of American government, the present system is not effective in maintaining an appropriate balance of power. He shows that continued judicial expansion, especially into the realm of public policy, might have severe consequences for America's national life and direction, and offers practical recommendations for safeguarding against an increasingly powerful Supreme Court. John Agresto's controversial argument, set in the context of a historical and theoretical inquiry, will be of great interest to scholars and students in political science and law, especially American constitutional law and political theory. 02 In The Supreme Court and Constitutional Democracy John Agresto traces the development of American judicial power, paying close attention to what he views as the very real threat of judicial supremacy. Agresto examines the role of the judiciary in a... In The Supreme Court and Constitutional Democracy John Agresto traces the development of American judicial power, paying close attention to what he views as the very real threat of judicial supremacy. Agresto examines the role of the judiciary in a democratic society and discusses the proper place of congressional power in constitutional issues. Agresto argues that while the separation of congressional and judicial functions is a fundamental tenet of American government, the present system is not effective in maintaining an appropriate balance of power. He shows that continued judicial expansion, especially into the realm of public policy, might have severe consequences for America's national life and direction, and offers practical recommendations for safeguarding against an increasingly powerful Supreme Court. John Agresto's controversial argument, set in the context of a historical and theoretical inquiry, will be of great interest to scholars and students in political science and law, especially American constitutional law and political theory. 02 In The Supreme Court and Constitutional Democracy John Agresto traces the development of American judicial power, paying close attention to what he views as the very real threat of judicial supremacy. Agresto examines the role of the judiciary in a...
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Author: Philip B. Kurland

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226464015

Category: Law

Page: 287

View: 5031

The papers in this collection are drawn from the annual The Supreme Court Review, which, since its inception in 1960, has been regarded by such legal scholars as Robert F. Drinnan, S. J., as "An indispensable, universally quoted work of the highest scholarship regarding the world's most influential tribunal." Now some of the most important contributions to the Review have been brought together in paperback editions that focus on issues that are becoming increasingly relevant to the ordinary citizen's daily life.
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Essays in Honour of Justice V.R. Krishna Iyer

Author: V. R. Krishna Iyer

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Festschriften

Page: 340

View: 3212

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Case Studies on Judicial Review and Public Policy

Author: Earl E. Pollock

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN: 0313365253

Category: Law

Page: 419

View: 4849

Topically arranged casebook of U.S. Supreme Court decisions with extensive commentary dissects the Court's decisions on current "hot-button" national policy issues.
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Author: Alexander Hamilton,James Madison,John Jay

Publisher: C.H.Beck

ISBN: 9783406547546

Category: Constitutional history

Page: 583

View: 9826

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a judicial function in democracies--Israel and the United States

Author: Yaacov S. Zemach

Publisher: Wayne State Univ Pr

ISBN: N.A

Category: Law

Page: 296

View: 4989

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Author: Martin Shapiro

Publisher: Quid Pro Books

ISBN: 1458196860

Category: Law

Page: 194

View: 2844

One of the great continuing disputes of U.S. politics is about the role of the Supreme Court. Another is about the First Amendment. This book is about both. A classic defense of the openly political role of the Court, this book belies the notion reasserted recently by Chief Justice Roberts that judges are just neutral umpires. Especially in the area of speech, judges make policy; they create law.
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A Study of Institutional Collapse

Author: S. Pompe

Publisher: SEAP Publications

ISBN: 9780877277385

Category: Political Science

Page: 494

View: 6835

Since the fall of Indonesian president Suharto, a major focus of the country's reformers has been the corrupt and inefficient judicial system. Within the context of a history of the Supreme Court in post-independence Indonesia, Sebastiaan Pompe analyzes the causes of the judiciary's failure over the last five decades. This study provides an essential background for those seeking to understand why legal reform has been so slow and frustrating in the post-1998 period.
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Author: Richard L. Pacelle, Jr,Brett W. Curry,Bryan W. Marshall

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1139498797

Category: Political Science

Page: N.A

View: 9137

There are three general models of Supreme Court decision making: the legal model, the attitudinal model and the strategic model. But each is somewhat incomplete. This book advances an integrated model of Supreme Court decision making that incorporates variables from each of the three models. In examining the modern Supreme Court, since Brown v. Board of Education, the book argues that decisions are a function of the sincere preferences of the justices, the nature of precedent, and the development of the particular issue, as well as separation of powers and the potential constraints posed by the president and Congress. To test this model, the authors examine all full, signed civil liberties and economic cases decisions in the 1953–2000 period. Decision Making by the Modern Supreme Court argues, and the results confirm, that judicial decision making is more nuanced than the attitudinal or legal models have argued in the past.
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Court Power and the Case for Restoring Popular Sovereignty in the United States

Author: William J. Watkins, Jr.

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN: 0786489987

Category: Political Science

Page: 223

View: 7882

Who has the final say on the meaning of the Constitution? From high school to law school, students learn that the framers designed the Supreme Court to be the ultimate arbiter of constitutional issues, a function Chief Justice John Marshall recognized in deciding Marbury v. Madison in 1803. This provocative work challenges American dogma about the Supreme Court’s role, showing instead that the founding generation understood judicial power not as a counterweight against popular government, but as a consequence, and indeed a support, of popular sovereignty. Contending that court power must be restrained so that policy decisions are left to the people’s elected representatives, this study offers several remedies—including term limits and popular selection of the Supreme Court—to return the American people to their proper place in the constitutional order.
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Why the Supreme Court is Not a Court and Its Justices are Not Judges

Author: Eric J. Segall

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN: 0313396876

Category: Law

Page: 219

View: 1900

This book explores some of the most glaring misunderstandings about the U.S. Supreme Court—and makes a strong case for why our Supreme Court Justices should not be entrusted with decisions that affect every American citizen.
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Critical Perspectives from Around the World

Author: Peter H. Russell,David M. O'Brien

Publisher: University of Virginia Press

ISBN: 9780813920153

Category: Law

Page: 325

View: 4762

This collection of essays by leading scholars of constitutional law looks at a critical component of constitutional democracy--judicial independence--from an international comparative perspective. Peter H. Russell's introduction outlines a general theory of judicial independence, while the contributors analyze a variety of regimes from the United States and Latin America to Russia and Eastern Europe, Western Europe and the United Kingdom, Australia, Israel, Japan, and South Africa. Russell's conclusion compares these various regimes in light of his own analytical framework.
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A Study of the Supreme Court of Canada

Author: Ian Bushnell

Publisher: McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP

ISBN: 0773563016

Category: Law

Page: 624

View: 5965

Throughout his study, Bushnell investigates the question of the absence of an independent judicial tradition in Canada and the development of distinct legal doctrine by the Supreme Court. He analyses the nature and cause of the lack of independent thought that makes the Court "captive" to inherited traditions and legal doctrines and prevents it from achieving its true potential within the Canadian legal system. Previous studies of the Court have concentrated on the years after 1949; by expanding the coverage to include the first three-quarters of a century of the Court's existence, Bushnell has uncovered a critical aspect of Canadian legal history. Bushnell provides an analysis of more than eighty cases decided by the Court between 1876 and 1989. He examines the backgrounds and views of the sixty-seven judges who served on the Supreme Court during this period, evaluating both the role they felt they played in Canadian society and the role others expected them to play. He studies the question of the right of appeal to the Judicial Committee of the Privy Council and its effect on the Supreme Court, as well as the movement toward the abolition of appeal. In the concluding part of the study Bushnell considers the controversy over the demand for impartial justice, criticism of the judiciary, and the judges who will take the Court into the twenty-first century.
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How the Supreme Court Decides Cases

Author: Bernard Schwartz

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN: 0195118006

Category: Law

Page: 288

View: 8223

Explains how the United States Supreme Court works, including how it selects and works on cases
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