Author: Morton J. Horwitz

Publisher: Macmillan

ISBN: 9780809016259

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 132

View: 8657

The Hill and Wang Critical Issues Series: concise, affordable works on pivotal topics in American history, society, and politics. The men who made up the Supreme Court when Earl Warren was Chief Justice (1953-69) changed America forever, and their decisions are still affecting constitutional law today. This overview of the Warren Court focuses on its landmark cases and enduring legacy.
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The Pursuit of Justice

Author: Christopher L. Tomlins

Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

ISBN: 9780618329694

Category: Law

Page: 578

View: 7024

A senior research fellow at the American Bar Foundation and the editor of Law and History Review offers an authoritative history of the Supreme Court, presenting eighteen essays by the nation's most renowned legal historians.
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Supreme Court Decisions that Shaped America

Author: Kermit L. Hall,John J. Patrick

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0195311892

Category: History

Page: 253

View: 2130

Reviews and discusses landmark cases heard by the United States Supreme court from 1803 through 2000.
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The Best and Worst in American Law with 100 Court and Judge Trivia Questions

Author: Bernard Schwartz

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN: 0195109619

Category: Law

Page: 292

View: 425

A unique, entertaining and informative collection offers lists of, and articles on, the ten best and worst Supreme Court justices, decisions, lawyers, courtroom movies, and much more, along with 150 trivia questions and answers about the world of law. UP.
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Edward Weinfeld as Lawyer and Judge

Author: William E Nelson

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 0814758940

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 291

View: 6290

In Pursuit of Right and Justice chronicles the life of the United States District Court's Judge Edward Weinfeld, from his humble Lower East Side origins to his distinction as one of the nation's most respected federal judges. Judge Edward Weinfeld's personal growth and socio-economic mobility provides an excellent illustration of how Catholics and Jews descended from turn-of-the-century immigrants were assimilated into the mainstream of New York and American life during the course of the twentieth century. Weinfeld left a rich collection of personal papers that William E. Nelson examines, which depict the compromises and sacrifices Weinfeld had to make to attain professional advancement. Weinfeld's jurisprudence remained closely tied to his own personal values and to the historical contexts in which cases came to his court. Nelson aptly describes how Weinfeld strove to avoid making new law. He tried to make decisions on preexisting rules or bedrock legal principles; he achieved just results by searching for and finding facts that called those rules into play. Weinfeld's vision of justice was simultaneously a liberal one that enabled him to develop law that reflected societal change, and an apolitical one that did not rest on contested policy judgments.
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Roman

Author: John Grisham

Publisher: Heyne Verlag

ISBN: 3641025486

Category: Fiction

Page: 480

View: 709

Wenn Recht zu Unrecht wird Sie verlor ihre ganze Familie. Um ihren Tod zu sühnen, zieht Jeannette Baker gegen einen der größten Chemiekonzerne der USA vor Gericht. Als ihrer Klage stattgegeben und das Unternehmen zu 41 Millionen Dollar Schadensersatz verurteilt wird, ist die Sensation perfekt. Doch dann geht Krane Chemical Inc. in Berufung, und eine Intrige unglaublichen Ausmaßes nimmt ihren Lauf.
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Why the Right is Wrong about the Courts

Author: Mark Kozlowski

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 0814749291

Category: Law

Page: 293

View: 3070

Few institutions have become as ferociously fought over in democratic politics as the courts. While political criticism of judges in this country goes back to its inception, today’s intensely ideological assault is nearly unprecedented. Spend any amount of time among the writings of contemporary right-wing critics of judicial power, and you are virtually assured of seeing repeated complaints about the “imperial judiciary.” American conservatives contend not only that judicial power has expanded dangerously in recent decades, but that liberal judges now willfully write their policy preferences into law. They raise alarms that American courts possess a degree of power incompatible with the functioning of a democratic polity. The Myth of the Imperial Judiciary explores the anti-judicial ideological trend of the American right, refuting these claims and taking a realistic look at the role of courts in our democracy to show that conservatives have a highly unrealistic conception of their power. Kozlowski first assesses the validity of the conservative view of the Founders’ intent, arguing that courts have played an assertive role in our politics since their establishment. He then considers contemporary judicial powers to show that conservatives have greatly overstated the extent to which the expansion of rights which has occurred has worked solely to the benefit of liberals. Kozlowski reveals the ways in which the claims of those on the right are often either unsupported or simply wrong. He concludes that American courts, far from imperiling our democracy or our moral fabric, stand as a bulwark against the abuse of legislative power, acting forcefully, as they have always done, to give meaning to constitutional promises.
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Presidential Politics and the Selection of Supreme Court Nominees

Author: David Alistair Yalof

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226945460

Category: Law

Page: 312

View: 1158

Yalof takes the reader behind the scenes of what happens before the Senate hearings to show how presidents decide who will sit on the highest court in the land. He draws on the papers of 7 modern presidents and firsthand interviews with key figures.
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Author: Sonia Sotomayor

Publisher: C.H.Beck

ISBN: 3406659489

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 349

View: 4800

Aufgewachsen in der Bronx, Puertoricanerin, die Kindheit prekär, der Vater Alkoholiker, die Mutter überfordert – Sonia Sotomayor war es nicht gerade in die Wiege gelegt, eines Tages Richterin am höchsten Gericht der Vereinigten Staaten von Amerika zu werden. Mit einem großen Herzen und viel Humor erzählt diese Ausnahmefrau von ihrem Weg, aber nicht um sich dabei auf die Schulter zu klopfen, sondern um anderen Menschen mit ihrer eigenen Geschichte Mut zu machen. Ein hinreißendes, ansteckendes Buch über das Trotzdem und über die – wirklich wichtigen – Dinge des Lebens. „’Nach der Lektüre werden mich die Leser nach menschlichen Kriterien beurteilen’, schreibt Sonia Sotomayor. Wir, die wir in diesem Fall die Jury sind, finden sie einfach unwiderstehlich.“ Washingtonian „Überwältigende und stark geschriebene Memoiren zum Thema Identität und Persönlichkeitsfindung ... Offenherzig, scharf beobachtet und vor allem tief empfunden.“ The New York Times „Eine Frau, die weiß, wo sie herkommt und die die Kraft hat, uns dorthin mitzunehmen.“ The New York Times Book Review
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A Civil Rights Milestone and Its Troubled Legacy

Author: James T. Patterson

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199880840

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 1334

2004 marks the fiftieth anniversary of the Supreme Court's unanimous decision to end segregation in public schools. Many people were elated when Supreme Court Chief Justice Earl Warren delivered Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka in May 1954, the ruling that struck down state-sponsored racial segregation in America's public schools. Thurgood Marshall, chief attorney for the black families that launched the litigation, exclaimed later, "I was so happy, I was numb." The novelist Ralph Ellison wrote, "another battle of the Civil War has been won. The rest is up to us and I'm very glad. What a wonderful world of possibilities are unfolded for the children!" Here, in a concise, moving narrative, Bancroft Prize-winning historian James T. Patterson takes readers through the dramatic case and its fifty-year aftermath. A wide range of characters animates the story, from the little-known African Americans who dared to challenge Jim Crow with lawsuits (at great personal cost); to Thurgood Marshall, who later became a Justice himself; to Earl Warren, who shepherded a fractured Court to a unanimous decision. Others include segregationist politicians like Governor Orval Faubus of Arkansas; Presidents Eisenhower, Johnson, and Nixon; and controversial Supreme Court justices such as William Rehnquist and Clarence Thomas. Most Americans still see Brown as a triumph--but was it? Patterson shrewdly explores the provocative questions that still swirl around the case. Could the Court--or President Eisenhower--have done more to ensure compliance with Brown? Did the decision touch off the modern civil rights movement? How useful are court-ordered busing and affirmative action against racial segregation? To what extent has racial mixing affected the academic achievement of black children? Where indeed do we go from here to realize the expectations of Marshall, Ellison, and others in 1954?
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Author: David J. Bodenhamer

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 019991303X

Category: History

Page: 296

View: 1238

The framers of the Constitution chose their words carefully when they wrote of a more perfect union--not absolutely perfect, but with room for improvement. Indeed, we no longer operate under the same Constitution as that ratified in 1788, or even the one completed by the Bill of Rights in 1791--because we are no longer the same nation. In The Revolutionary Constitution, David J. Bodenhamer provides a comprehensive new look at America's basic law, integrating the latest legal scholarship with historical context to highlight how it has evolved over time. The Constitution, he notes, was the product of the first modern revolution, and revolutions are, by definition, moments when the past shifts toward an unfamiliar future, one radically different from what was foreseen only a brief time earlier. In seeking to balance power and liberty, the framers established a structure that would allow future generations to continually readjust the scale. Bodenhamer explores this dynamic through seven major constitutional themes: federalism, balance of powers, property, representation, equality, rights, and security. With each, he takes a historical approach, following their changes over time. For example, the framers wrote multiple protections for property rights into the Constitution in response to actions by state governments after the Revolution. But twentieth-century courts--and Congress--redefined property rights through measures such as zoning and the designation of historical landmarks (diminishing their commercial value) in response to the needs of a modern economy. The framers anticipated just such a future reworking of their own compromises between liberty and power. With up-to-the-minute legal expertise and a broad grasp of the social and political context, this book is a tour de force of Constitutional history and analysis.
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The Debate Over Discrimination and School Funding

Author: Paul A. Sracic

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Education

Page: 169

View: 7492

An in-depth study of school financing examined through the closely decided Supreme Court case that overturned a ruling that found Texas's system for financing its public schools was unconstitutional, signaling the end of an era in the pursuit of equal education for all American citizens.
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The Supreme Court, Academic Freedom, and the Anti-Communist Purge

Author: Marjorie Heins

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 0814770266

Category: Law

Page: 384

View: 2752

Priests of Our Democracy tells of the teachers and professors who battled the anti-communist witch hunt of the 1950s. It traces the political fortunes of academic freedom beginning in the late 19th century, both on campus and in the courts. Combining political and legal history with wrenching personal stories, the book details how the anti-communist excesses of the 1950s inspired the Supreme Court to recognize the vital role of teachers and professors in American democracy. The crushing of dissent in the 1950s impoverished political discourse in ways that are still being felt, and First Amendment academic freedom, a product of that period, is in peril today. In compelling terms, this book shows why the issue should matter to everyone.
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Law, Politics, and Supreme Court Decision Making in Brown v. Board of Education

Author: Jeffrey D. Hockett

Publisher: University of Virginia Press

ISBN: 0813933757

Category: Law

Page: 280

View: 8397

On the way to offering a new analysis of the basis of the Supreme Court’s iconic decision in Brown v. Board of Education, Jeffrey Hockett critiques an array of theories that have arisen to explain it and Supreme Court decision making generally. Drawing upon justices’ books, articles, correspondence, memoranda, and draft opinions, A Storm over This Court demonstrates that the puzzle of Brown’s basis cannot be explained by any one theory. Borrowing insights from numerous approaches to analyzing Supreme Court decision making, this study reveals the inaccuracy of the popular perception that most of the justices merely acted upon a shared, liberal preference for an egalitarian society when they held that racial segregation in public education violates the equal protection clause of the Fourteenth Amendment. A majority of the justices were motivated, instead, by institutional considerations, including a recognition of the need to present a united front in such a controversial case, a sense that the Court had a significant role to play in international affairs during the Cold War, and a belief that the Court had an important mission to counter racial injustice in American politics. A Storm over This Court demonstrates that the infusion of justices’ personal policy preferences into the abstract language of the Constitution is not the only alternative to an originalist approach to constitutional interpretation. Ultimately, Hockett concludes that the justices' decisions in Brown resist any single, elegant explanation. To fully explain this watershed decision—and, by implication, others—it is necessary to employ a range of approaches dictated by the case in question.
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Author: Alexander Hamilton,James Madison,John Jay

Publisher: C.H.Beck

ISBN: 9783406547546

Category: Constitutional history

Page: 583

View: 9603

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The Constitution, the State, and American Citizenship

Author: Thomas Alexander ALEINIKOFF,Thomas Alexander Aleinikoff

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 0674020154

Category: Law

Page: 320

View: 9516

In a set of cases decided at the end of the nineteenth century, the Supreme Court declared that Congress had "plenary power" to regulate immigration, Indian tribes, and newly acquired territories. Not coincidentally, the groups subject to Congress' plenary power were primarily nonwhite and generally perceived as "uncivilized." The Court left Congress free to craft policies of assimilation, exclusion, paternalism, and domination. Despite dramatic shifts in constitutional law in the twentieth century, the plenary power case decisions remain largely the controlling law. The Warren Court, widely recognized for its dedication to individual rights, focused on ensuring "full and equal citizenship"--an agenda that utterly neglected immigrants, tribes, and residents of the territories. The Rehnquist Court has appropriated the Warren Court's rhetoric of citizenship, but has used it to strike down policies that support diversity and the sovereignty of Indian tribes. Attuned to the demands of a new century, the author argues for abandonment of the plenary power cases, and for more flexible conceptions of sovereignty and citizenship. The federal government ought to negotiate compacts with Indian tribes and the territories that affirm more durable forms of self-government. Citizenship should be "decentered," understood as a commitment to an intergenerational national project, not a basis for denying rights to immigrants. Table of Contents: 1. Introduction 2. The Sovereignty Cases and the Pursuit of an American Nation-State 3. The Citizen-State: From the Warren Court to the Rehnqnist Court 4. Commonwealth and the Constitution: The Case of Puerto Rico 5. The Erosion of American Indian Sovereignty 6. Indian Tribal Sovereignty beyond Plenary Power 7. Plenary Power, Immigration Regulation, and Decentered Citizenship 8. Reconceptualizing Sovereignty: Toward a New American Narrative Notes Index Reviews of this book: This book not only provides careful analysis of U.S. Supreme Court and congressional relationships but also could lead to novel studies of rights and obligations in American society. Highly recommended. --Steven Puro, Library Journal Reviews of this book: Aleinikoff examines sovereignty, citizenship, and the broader concept of membership (aliens as well as citizens) in the American nation-state and suggests that American constitutional law needs "understandings of sovereignty and membership that are supple and flexible, open to new arrangements"...Sure to generate heated debate over the extent to which the rules governing immigration, Indian tribes, and American territories should be altered, this book is required reading for constitutional scholars. --R. J. Steamer, Choice Amid the overflowing scholarship on American constitutional law, little has been written on this cluster of topics, which go to the core of what sovereignty under the Constitution means. Aleinikoff asks not only how we define "ourselves," but exactly who is authorized to place themselves in the category of insiders empowered to set limits excluding others. The book stands out as a novel, intriguing, and interesting analysis against the sea of sameness found in the constitutional literature. --Philip P. Frickey, Law School, University of California, Berkeley What lends Aleinikoff's work originality and importance is its synthetic range and the new insights that flow from bringing immigration, Indian, and territorial issues together, and taking on such much criticized anomalies as the plenary power doctrine in their full ambit. In my view, he may well make good on his hope of helping to inspire a new field of sovereignty studies. Certainly, the idea of "problematizing" national citizenship and national sovereignty is afoot in the law schools and, far more so, in sociology, political science, and in various interdisciplinary fields like American Studies, regional studies, and global political economiy and cultural studies. To my knowledge, no one has written a synthetic treatment of these issues that compares with Aleinikoff's in its mastery of constitutional law, its working knowledge or adjacent normative, historical and policy studies, and its intellectual clarity, stylistic grace, and morally sensitive but pragmatic political judgments. --William Forbath, University of Texas at Austin Law School
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Speeches and Writings

Author: Thurgood Marshall

Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

ISBN: 9780812236903

Category: Law

Page: 336

View: 7960

To understand fully the complexities of Thurgood Marshall's work as a practicing lawyer, civil rights advocate for the NAACP Legal Defense Fund, federal judge, and the first African American appointed Solicitor General of the United States and Justice of the United States Supreme Court, these texts are indispensable. The early speeches assembled by J. Clay Smith, Jr., focus on the Detroit riots of the 1940s and 1950s, one of the most important periods of Marshall's life, culminating in his arguments before the Supreme Court in Brown v. Board of Education and Bolling v. Sharpe, which in 1954 struck down de jure segregation in public education. Throughout the materials from the next four decades, Marshall comes to life as a teacher, leader, and strategist, explaining, preaching, and cajoling audiences to stand up for their rights. The addresses collected by Smith present a less formal picture of Marshall, from which one can learn much about the depth of his skills and strategies to conquer racism, promote democracy, and create a world influenced by his vision for a just and moral society. Supreme Justice reveals Marshall as a dogged opponent of unequal schools and a staunch proponent of the protection of black people from violence and the death penalty. Through his own words we see the genius of a man with an ability to inspire diverse crowds in clear language and see him also demonstrate his powers of persuasion in formal settings outside the court. His writings not only enhance our understanding of his groundbreaking advocacy in law and social conflicts, they reveal the names of men and women of all races who made significant contributions leading to Brown v. Board of Education and beyond.
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Author: Ronald Dworkin

Publisher: Suhrkamp Verlag

ISBN: 3518780204

Category: Philosophy

Page: 813

View: 1338

»Der Fuchs weiß viele Dinge, aber der Igel weiß eine große Sache.« Der griechische Dichter Archilochos hat diesen Satz formuliert, Isaiah Berlin hat ihn mit seinem Tolstoi-Essay berühmt gemacht. Aber was ist diese »eine große Sache«? Ronald Dworkin liefert eine Antwort: Es sind Werte in all ihren Erscheinungsformen. Wenn wir verstehen wollen, was Wahrheit und Schönheit sind, was dem Leben Sinn verleiht, was die Moral fordert und die Gerechtigkeit verlangt, so müssen wir der Spur jener moralischen Einstellungen nachgehen, die menschliches Denken, Fühlen und Handeln durchdringen und zu einer Einheit formen. »Gerechtigkeit für Igel« ist eines jener Bücher, wie es sie in Zeiten der Füchse – der Spezialisten und Skeptiker – immer seltener gibt: eines, das aus einem einzigen Prinzip eine ganze Welt erklären und zugleich Orientierung geben möchte.
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Roman

Author: Sloan Wilson

Publisher: Dumont Buchverlag

ISBN: 3832187065

Category: Fiction

Page: 446

View: 1707

Der amerikanische Klassiker in neuer Übersetzung Tom und Betsy Rath sind ein junges Paar, sie haben drei gesunde Kinder, ein schönes Zuhause in einem netten Vorort von New York und ein regelmäßiges, wenn auch nicht üppiges Einkommen. Eigentlich haben sie allen Grund, glücklich zu sein. Doch irgendwie sind sie es nicht. Tom pendelt Tag für Tag in die Stadt, wo er einem unspektakulären Bürojob nachgeht – seit er aus dem Krieg zurückgekehrt ist, hat er sich ohnehin verändert, ist verschlossen und launisch. Betsy fühlt sich unverstanden. Nach einem Karriereschritt hat Tom bald keine Zeit mehr für sein Privatleben. Ist es das, was Tom wirklich will? Als er auf einen alten Kameraden aus dem Krieg trifft, gerät sein Alltag vollends aus den Fugen, Tom muss sich seiner Vergangenheit stellen und eine Entscheidung treffen, die sein Leben grundsätzlich verändern wird. ›Der Mann im grauen Flanell‹, im Original 1955 veröffentlicht und sofort ein Bestseller, vermittelt wie wenige andere Romane den Geist der fünfziger Jahre. Zu Recht gilt er als moderner Klassiker und verdient es, zusammen mit den Werken von Richard Yates, John Cheever und Raymond Carver genannt zu werden. Der Buchtitel war so treffend, dass er im Englischen zu einem feststehenden Begriff wurde. Nun liegt der Roman in einer zeitgemäßen deutschen Übersetzung vor.
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