The First Battle of the Twentieth Century

Author: William James Philpott

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 9780307278371

Category: History

Page: 631

View: 7652

A provocative reinterpretation of a defining World War I battle argues that it provided crucial information to British and French forces to ending the war by shaping period understandings of such emerging technologies as the tank and machine gun. Reprint.
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Germany and Austria-Hungary 1914-1918

Author: Holger H. Herwig

Publisher: A&C Black

ISBN: 147251081X

Category: History

Page: 496

View: 5370

The Great War toppled four empires, cost the world 24 million dead, and sowed the seeds of another worldwide conflict 20 years later. This is the only book in the English language to offer comprehensive coverage of how Germany and Austria-Hungary, two of the key belligerents, conducted the war and what defeat meant to them. This new edition has been thoroughly updated throughout, including new developments in the historiography and, in particular, addressing new work on the cultural history of the war. This edition also includes: - New material on the domestic front, covering Austria-Hungary's internal political frictions and ethnic fissures - More on Austria-Hungary and Germany's position within the wider geopolitical framework - Increased coverage of the Eastern front The First World War: Germany and Austria-Hungary, 1914-1918 offers an authoritative and well-researched survey of the role of the Central powers that will be an invaluable text for all those studying the First World War and the development of modern warfare.
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Author: William Philpott

Publisher: The Overlook Press

ISBN: 1468312316

Category: History

Page: 416

View: 6882

“Philpott argues persuasively that the last hundred days of the war were the result of a steep learning curve necessitated by earlier bloodbaths.” —The Wall Street Journal A Wall Street Journal Best Non-Fiction Book of 2014! The Great War of 1914–1918 was the first mass conflict to fully mobilize the resources of industrial powers against one another, resulting in a brutal, bloody, protracted war of attrition between the world’s great economies. Now, one hundred years after the first guns of August rang out on the Western front, historian William Philpott reexamines the causes and lingering effects of the first truly modern war. Drawing on the experience of front line soldiers, munitions workers, politicians, and diplomats, War of Attrition explains for the first time why and how this new type of conflict was fought as it was fought; and how the attitudes and actions of political and military leaders, and the willing responses of their peoples, stamped the twentieth century with unprecedented carnage on—and behind—the battlefield. War of Attrition also establishes link between the bloody ground war in Europe and political situation in the wider world, particularly the United States. America did not enter the war until 1917, but, as Philpott demonstrates, the war came to America as early as 1914. By 1916, long before the Woodrow Wilson’s impassioned speech to Congress advocating for war, the United States was firmly aligned with the Allies, lending dollars and selling guns and opposing German attempts to spread submarine warfare. War of Attrition skillfully argues that the emergence of the United States on the world stage is directly related to her support for the conflagration that consumed so many European lives and livelihoods. In short, the war that ruined Europe enabled the rise of America.
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The British Army's Experience on the Western Front 1916-1918

Author: Peter Simkins

Publisher: Pen and Sword

ISBN: 1473841046

Category: History

Page: 256

View: 448

Peter Simkins has established a reputation over the last forty years as one of the most original and stimulating historians of the First World War. He has made a major contribution to the debate about the performance of the British Army on the Western Front. This collection of his most perceptive and challenging essays, which concentrates on British operations in France between 1916 and 1918, shows that this reputation is richly deserved. He focuses on key aspects of the army's performance in battle, from the first day of the Somme to the Hundred Days, and gives a fascinating insight into the developing theory and practice of the army as it struggled to find a way to break through the German line. His rigorous analysis undermines some of the common assumptions - and the myths - that still cling to the history of these British battles.
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The Australian War Memorial Battlefield Guide

Author: Peter Pedersen

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 111823832X

Category: History

Page: 600

View: 9981

A lavishly illustrated account of the ANZACs involvement in theWestern Front--complete with walking and driving tours of 28battlefields With rare photographs and documents from the Australian WarMemorial archive and extensive travel information, this is the mostcomprehensive guide to the battlefields of the Western Front on themarket. Every chapter covers not just the battles, but the oftenlarger-than-life personalities who took part in them.Following a chronological order from 1916 through 1918, the bookleads readers through every major engagement the Australian and NewZealanders fought in and includes tactical considerations andextracts from the personal diaries of soldiers. This is the perfectbook for anyone who wants to explore the battlefields of theWestern Front, either in-person or from the comfort of home.
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Author: Andrew Rawson

Publisher: Pen & Sword Books

ISBN: 9781526723321

Category:

Page: 144

View: 1947

This is an account of the British Expeditionary Force's defensive battle on the Somme in March and April of 1918. It starts with the huge German offensive along a 60 mile front on 21 March. Third and Fifth Armies then had to make a series of fighting withdrawals in which some battalions had to fight their way out while others were overrun. Over the days that followed, men were called upon to fight all day against overwhelming numbers and then march all night to escape. After three years in the trenches, men had to battle in the open without tanks and often without artillery support. As communications failed, battalion and company commanders found themselves having to command in what was essentially a desperate infantry struggle. Each stage of the two week battle is given the same treatment, covering details about the most talked about side of the campaign, the British side. It explains how the British soldier time and again stood and fought. Over fifty new maps chart the day by day progress of each corps on each day. Together the narrative and the maps explain the British Army's experience during a fraught battle for survival. The men who made a difference are mentioned; those who led the advances, those who stopped the counterattacks and those who were awarded the Victoria Cross. Discover the Somme 1918 campaign and learn how the British Army's brave soldiers fought and died trying to stop the onslaught.
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Author: Mark Lloyd

Publisher: Pen and Sword

ISBN: 1473811961

Category: History

Page: 224

View: 5431

Mark Lloyd treats this much neglected aspect of warfare thematically rather than chronologically, examining in turn the various methods by which deception has been practised through the ages. He draws on a wide range of examples to show the elaborate techniques which have been employed in the struggle to outwit the enemy. Particularly fascinating is his analysis of the fatal error of self-deception.
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Author: Martin Middlebrook

Publisher: Pen and Sword

ISBN: 184415498X

Category: History

Page: 430

View: 6947

At 9.30am on 21 March 1918, the last great battle of the First World War commenced when three German armies struck a massive blow against the weak divisions of the British Third and Fifth Armies. It was the first day of what the Germans called the Kaiserschlacht (‘the Kaiser’s Battle’), the series of attacks that were intended to break the deadlock on the Western Front, knock the British Army out of the war, and finally bring victory to Germany. In the event the cost of the gamble was so heavy that once the assault faltered, it remained for the Allies to push the exhausted German armies back and the War was at last over. Critics accounts: The clever blending of written and oral accounts from some 650 surviving British and German soldiers makes the book an extremely convincing reconstruction. SUNDAY TIMES Mr Middlebrook’s industry and patience are displayed in his amazing collection of eyewitness accounts, the compassion in his commentary, the good sense in his analysis’ DAILY TELEGRAPH
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Author: Anthony Fletcher

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 0300198566

Category: History

Page: 352

View: 3249

DIV This book was inspired by the author’s discovery of an extraordinary cache of letters from a soldier who was killed on the Western Front during the First World War. The soldier was his grandfather, and the letters had been tucked away, unread and unmentioned for many decades. Intrigued by the heartbreak and history of these family letters, Fletcher sought out the correspondence of other British soldiers who had volunteered for the fight against Germany. This resulting volume offers a vivid account of the physical and emotional experiences of seventeen British soldiers whose letters survive. Drawn from different regiments, social backgrounds, and areas of England and Scotland, they include twelve officers and five ordinary “Tommies.”/div DIV /div DIV The book explores the training, journey to France, fear, shellshock, and life in the trenches as well as the leisure, love, and home leave the soldiers dreamed of. Fletcher discusses the psychological responses of 17- and 18-year-old men facing appalling realities and considers the particular pressures on those who survived their fallen comrades. While acknowledging the horror and futility the soldiers of the Great War experienced, the author shows another side to the story, focusing new attention on the loyal comradeship, robust humor, and strong morale that uplifted the men at the Front and created a powerful bond among them./div
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Author: Michael S. Neiberg

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 9780814758328

Category: History

Page: 375

View: 8413

A collection of primary and secondary documents that offers students, scholars, and war buffs an extensive and easy-to-follow overview of World War I.
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The Fifth Army Retreat

Author: Jerry Murland

Publisher: Pen and Sword

ISBN: 1781592675

Category: History

Page: 208

View: 9414

The German Spring offensive or Kaiserschlacht was a period of great danger for the Allies. Both sides were exhausted after years of bitter fighting and huge losses. While eventually catastrophically unsuccessful and the prelude to their final defeat, the Germans forced the Allies back over hard-won ground until the tide turned.??Historian Jerry Murland has researched and visited the scenes of desperate actions during late March 1918. He describes in graphic detail the battles fought by British, Irish and South African regiments in the area from St Leger in the North to La Fere in the South. He unearths the extraordinary stories of unit and individual courage. He also examines the work of the Royal Engineers who blew bridges and disrupted lines of communication. ??This original approach covers battles that in many cases have only been described briefly in official histories. The book is a useful companion for any battlefield visitor.
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Douglas Haig and the British Army

Author: Gary Sheffield

Publisher: Aurum Press Limited

ISBN: 1845137345

Category: History

Page: 280

View: 9570

‘ Well written and persuasive … objective and well-rounded… .this scholarly rehabilitation should be the standard biography’ **** Andrew Roberts, Mail on Sunday ‘ A true judgment of him must lie somewhere between hero and zero, and in this detailed biography Gary Sheffield shows himself well qualified to make it … a balanced portrait’ Sunday Times ‘ Solid scholarship and admirable advocacy’ Sunday Telegraph Douglas Haig is the single most controversial general in British history. In 1918, after his armies had won the First World War, he was feted as a saviour. But within twenty years his reputation was in ruins, and it has never recovered. In this fascinating biography, Professor Gary Sheffield reassesses Haig’ s reputation, assessing his critical role in preparing the army for war.
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A Case Study in The Operational Level of War

Author: David T. Zabecki

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134252242

Category: History

Page: 432

View: 5632

This is the first study of the Ludendorff Offensives of 1918 based extensively on key German records presumed to be lost forever after Potsdam was bombed in 1944. In 1997, David T. Zabecki discovered translated copies of these files in a collection of old instructional material at the U.S. Army Command and General Staff College at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas. He presents his findings here for the first time, with a thorough review of the surviving original operational plans and orders, to offer a wealth of fresh insights to the German Offensives of 1918. David T. Zabecki clearly demonstrates how the German failure to exploit the vulnerabilities in the BEF’s rail system led to the failure of the first two offensives, and how inadequacies in the German rail system determined the outcome of the last three offensives. This is a window into the mind of the German General Staff of World War I, with thorough analysis of the German planning and decision making processes during the execution of battles. This is also the first study in English or in German to analyze the specifics of the aborted Operation HAGEN plan. This is also the first study of the 1918 Offensives to focus on the ‘operational level of war’ and on the body of military activity known as ‘the operational art’, rather than on the conventional tactical or strategic levels. This book will be of great interest to all students of World War I, the German Army and of strategic studies and military theory in general.
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Author: Clinton Mhic Aonghais

Publisher: Trafford Publishing

ISBN: 1490739106

Category: History

Page: 914

View: 5136

The account of a Suffolk family from Woolpit and two of its sons; - one from England and the other from New Zealand. One would experience the plight of those at Gallipoli, Egypt, and in Palestine, while the other would have his destiny played out on the Western Front in France. This is a true story that covers hardship and sacrifice; from prison hulks on the Thames to the vagaries of WW1 at sea, on the ground, and in the air. It takes the reader on the journeys of New Zealand's hospital ships, to air attacks at Gallipoli, and Zeppelins over England; from U boats and disaster at sea, to the horrors of the battle of the Somme. It was a time when love, hardship and duty were forged together with the fighting of a war that was supposedly the War to End all Wars'.
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The Illustrated edition

Author: Sir Walter Raleigh

Publisher: Pen and Sword

ISBN: 1473850126

Category: History

Page: 409

View: 9227

This magnificent and comprehensive volume was written in 1922 by Professor Walter Raleigh. Originally entitled The History of the War in the Air (Being the story of the part played in the Great War by the Royal Air Force) this all embracing and vital work features the most important account of the aerial battles, the men and the machines.??Raleigh was Professor of English Literature at Glasgow University and Chair of English Literature at Oxford University. On the outbreak of the Great War he turned to the war as his primary subject. His finest book on the subject is this, the first volume of The War in the Air, which was an instant publishing success. Unfortunately the projected second volume was never completed as Raleigh died from typhoid (which he contracted during a visit to the Near East) in 1922. Nonetheless, Professor Sir Walter Alexander Raleigh has attained classic status as a result of this mighty work and this legendary volume ensures his status as a military author par excellence.
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Author: David Bilton

Publisher: Pen and Sword

ISBN: 1473814596

Category: History

Page: 270

View: 2004

This highly illustrated book covers the German retreat from the Somme, through the defensive battles of 1917, the Kaiserschlacht (Kaiser's Battle) of early 1918, to the final Allied offensive from August to the end of the War. The post-Armistice events are also covered as the implications of defeat sunk in on an exhausted nation and its shattered army. Each phase is analysed from the German point of view giving an original angle. The photographs vividly demonstrate life and events both at the front line in the trenches as well as in the rear echelons. This book will appeal to a wide spectrum of readers. Its highly illustrated nature is ideal for the general reader while its rare photographs and unusual angle will make it collectable by the more specialist reader.
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Author: Peter Hart

Publisher: Pegasus Books

ISBN: 1605987654

Category: History

Page: 624

View: 7841

One of the bloodiest battles in world history—a military tragedy that would come to define a generation. On July 1, 1916, the British Army launched the “Big Push” that was supposed to bring an end to the horrific stalemate on the Western Front between British, French, and German forces. What resulted was one of the greatest single human catastrophes in twentieth century warfare. Scrambling out of trenches in the face of German machine guns and artillery fire, the Allied Powers lost over twenty thousand soldiers that first day. This “battle” would drag on for another four bloody months, resulting in over one million causalities among the three powers. As the oral historian at the Imperial War Museum in London, Peter Hart has brought to light new material never before seen or heard. The Somme is an unparalleled evocation of World War I’s iconic contest—the definitive account of one of the major tragedies of the twentieth century.
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Herosim and Horror in the First World War

Author: Martin Gilbert

Publisher: Henry Holt and Company

ISBN: 1429966882

Category: History

Page: 352

View: 3229

From one of our most distinguished historians, an authoritative and vivid account of the devastating World War I battle that claimed more than 300,000 lives At 7:30 am on July 1, 1916, the first Allied soldiers climbed out of their trenches along the Somme River in France and charged out into no-man's-land toward the barbed wire and machine guns at the German front lines. By the end of this first day of the Allied attack, the British army alone would lose 20,000 men; in the coming months, the fifteen-mile-long territory along the river would erupt into the epicenter of the Great War. The Somme would mark a turning point in both the war and military history, as soldiers saw the first appearance of tanks on the battlefield, the emergence of the air war as a devastating and decisive factor in battle, and more than one million casualties (among them a young Adolf Hitler, who took a fragment in the leg). In just 138 days, 310,000 men died. In this vivid, deeply researched account of one history's most destructive battles, historian Martin Gilbert tracks the Battle of the Somme through the experiences of footsoldiers (known to the British as the PBI, for Poor Bloody Infantry), generals, and everyone in between. Interwoven with photographs, journal entries, original maps, and documents from every stage and level of planning, The Somme is the most authoritative and affecting account of this bloody turning point in the Great War.
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Author: Clayton Donnell

Publisher: Pen and Sword

ISBN: 1848848137

Category: History

Page: 256

View: 9007

Breaking the Fortress Line 1914 offers a fascinating new perspective on the German offensive against France and Belgium in 1914. In graphic detail it describes the intense fighting that took place around the forts and fortified cities that stood in the path of the German invasion. The ordeal began with the German assault on the mighty fortress of Liège. They took twelve days to batter their way through the 'Gateway to Belgium', losing thousands of men in repeated frontal assaults, and they had to bring up the heaviest siege artillery ever used to destroy the defences.??This is the epic struggle that Clayton Donnell depicts in this compelling account of a neglected aspect of the battles that followed the outbreak of the Great War. Not only does he reconstruct the German attack on the strongpoints they encountered along the entire invasion line, but he traces the history and design of these fixed defences and analyses the massive military building programmes undertaken by the French, the Germans and the Belgians between 1871 and 1914. ??Thousands of huge forts, infantry strongpoints, bunkers, casemates and shelters were dug out along the French and German borders. The German Moselstellung and Steinbruch-stellung were born. These massive concrete fortress systems with steel gun turrets and diesel motors to generate electricity were a completely new concept of fortress design.??As war approached, France and Germany devised plans to overcome each other's powerful armies and these border defences. The French plan avoided contact with the German fortress system. But the Kaiser's army faced twelve forts at Liège, nine more at Namur, and then the strongpoints of the first and second Séré de Rivières lines. Clayton Donnell provides a gripping narrative of the violent confrontation that followed.
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