His Speeches, Writings, Arguments, Opinions, and Reminiscences

Author: Mark V. Tushnet

Publisher: Chicago Review Press

ISBN: 1613746407

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 552

View: 1789

Profiles the life and works of Thurgood Marshall, with his speeches, writings, arguments, opinions and reminiscences.
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A Biography

Author: Glenn L. Starks,F. Erik Brooks

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN: 0313349169

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 145

View: 4963

This book provides a detailed examination of the life and legal legacy of Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall, including a discussion of the many legal cases in which he was involved. * A chronological timeline of the life of Thurgood Marshall * A bibliography provides useful references
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American Revolutionary

Author: Juan Williams

Publisher: Three Rivers Press

ISBN: 0307786129

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 504

View: 2195

This New York Times Notable Book of the Year, 1998, is now in trade paper. From the bestselling author of Eyes on the Prize, here is the definitive biography of the great lawyer and Supreme Court justice. From the Trade Paperback edition.
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Speeches and Writings

Author: Thurgood Marshall

Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

ISBN: 9780812236903

Category: Law

Page: 336

View: 7698

To understand fully the complexities of Thurgood Marshall's work as a practicing lawyer, civil rights advocate for the NAACP Legal Defense Fund, federal judge, and the first African American appointed Solicitor General of the United States and Justice of the United States Supreme Court, these texts are indispensable. The early speeches assembled by J. Clay Smith, Jr., focus on the Detroit riots of the 1940s and 1950s, one of the most important periods of Marshall's life, culminating in his arguments before the Supreme Court in Brown v. Board of Education and Bolling v. Sharpe, which in 1954 struck down de jure segregation in public education. Throughout the materials from the next four decades, Marshall comes to life as a teacher, leader, and strategist, explaining, preaching, and cajoling audiences to stand up for their rights. The addresses collected by Smith present a less formal picture of Marshall, from which one can learn much about the depth of his skills and strategies to conquer racism, promote democracy, and create a world influenced by his vision for a just and moral society. Supreme Justice reveals Marshall as a dogged opponent of unequal schools and a staunch proponent of the protection of black people from violence and the death penalty. Through his own words we see the genius of a man with an ability to inspire diverse crowds in clear language and see him also demonstrate his powers of persuasion in formal settings outside the court. His writings not only enhance our understanding of his groundbreaking advocacy in law and social conflicts, they reveal the names of men and women of all races who made significant contributions leading to Brown v. Board of Education and beyond.
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The Making of a Supreme Court Justice

Author: Larry S. Gibson

Publisher: Prometheus Books

ISBN: 1616145722

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 413

View: 3735

Thurgood Marshall was the most important American lawyer of the twentieth century. He transformed the nation's legal landscape by challenging the racial segregation that had relegated millions to second-class citizenship. He won twenty-nine of thirty-three cases before the United States Supreme Court, was a federal appeals court judge, served as the US solicitor general, and, for twenty-four years, sat on the Supreme Court. Marshall is best known for achievements after he relocated to New York in 1936 to work for the NAACP. But Marshall's personality, attitudes, priorities, and work habits had crystallized during earlier years in Maryland. This work is the first close examination of the formative period in Marshall's life. As the authorn shows, Thurgood Marshall was a fascinating man of contrasts. He fought for racial justice without becoming a racist. Simultaneously idealistic and pragmatic, Marshall was a passionate advocate, yet he maintained friendly relationships with his opponents. Young Thurgood reveals how Marshall's distinctive traits were molded by events, people, and circumstances early in his life. Professor Gibson presents fresh information about Marshall's family, youth, and education. He describes Marshall's key mentors, the special impact of his high school and college competitive debating, his struggles to establish a law practice during the Great Depression, and his first civil rights cases. The author sheds new light on the NAACP and its first lawsuits in the campaign that led to the 1954 Brown v. Board of Education school desegregation decision. He also corrects some of the often-repeated stories about Marshall that are inaccurate. The only biography of Thurgood Marshall to be endorsed by Marshall’s immediate family, Young Thurgood is an exhaustively researched and engagingly written work that everyone interested in law, civil rights, American history, and biography will want to read. From the Hardcover edition.
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Author: Geoffrey M. Horn

Publisher: Gareth Stevens Publishing LLLP

ISBN: 9780836850987

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 48

View: 418

An introduction to the life and accomplishments of the African American civil rights attorney who became a prominent Supreme Court justice.
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Thurgood Marshall, the Groveland Boys, and the Dawn of a New America

Author: Gilbert King

Publisher: Harper Collins

ISBN: 0062097717

Category: History

Page: 464

View: 2279

Devil in the Grove, winner of the Pulitzer Prize for general nonfiction, is a gripping true story of racism, murder, rape, and the law. It brings to light one of the most dramatic court cases in American history, and offers a rare and revealing portrait of Thurgood Marshall that the world has never seen before. As Isabel Wilkerson’s The Warmth of Other Suns did for the story of America’s black migration, Gilbert King’s Devil in the Grove does for this great untold story of American legal history, a dangerous and uncertain case from the days immediately before Brown v. Board of Education in which the young civil rights attorney Marshall risked his life to defend a boy slated for the electric chair—saving him, against all odds, from being sentenced to death for a crime he did not commit.
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Warrior at the Bar, Rebel on the Bench

Author: Michael D. Davis,Hunter R. Clark

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780735100978

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 442

View: 2525

Describes the Justice's early life in a segregated Baltimore, his work as a civil rights attorney, and his record on the bench
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Thurgood Marshall and the Supreme Court Nomination that Changed America

Author: Wil Haygood

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 0307947378

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 404

View: 9347

"The author of The Butler presents a revelatory biography of the first African-American Supreme Court justice--one of the giants of the civil rights movement, and one of the most transforming Supreme Court justices of the 20th century, "--Novelist.
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Charles Hamilton Houston, Thurgood Marshall, and the Struggle to End Segregation

Author: Rawn James, Jr.

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing USA

ISBN: 9781608191680

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 2999

Although widely viewed as the beginning of the legal struggle to end segregation, the U.S. Supreme Court's decision Brown v. Board of Education was in fact the culmination of decades of legal challenges led by a band of lawyers intent on dismantling segregation one statute at a time. Root and Branch is the compelling story of the fiercely committed laywers that constructed the legal foundation for what we now call the civil rights movement. Charles Hamilton Houston laid the groundwork, reinventing the law school at Howard University (where he taught a young, brash Thurgood Marshall) and becoming special counsel to the NAACP. Later Houston and Marshall traveled through the hostile South, looking for cases with which to dismantle America's long-systematized racism, often at great personal risk. The abstemious, buttoned-down Houston and the folksy, easygoing Marshall made an unlikely pair-but their accomplishments in bringing down Jim Crow made an unforgettable impact on U.S. legal history.
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A True Story of Violence, Race, and Justice Lost and Found

Author: Gilbert King

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 0399183434

Category: History

Page: 432

View: 3121

"Compelling, insightful and important, Beneath a Ruthless Sun exposes the corruption of racial bigotry and animus that shadows a community, a state and a nation. A fascinating examination of an injustice story all too familiar and still largely ignored, an engaging and essential read." --Bryan Stevenson, author of Just Mercy From the author of the Pulitzer Prize-winning bestseller Devil in the Grove, the gripping true story of a small town with a big secret. In December 1957, the wife of a Florida citrus baron is raped in her home while her husband is away. She claims a "husky Negro" did it, and the sheriff, the infamous racist Willis McCall, does not hesitate to round up a herd of suspects. But within days, McCall turns his sights on Jesse Daniels, a gentle, mentally impaired white nineteen-year-old. Soon Jesse is railroaded up to the state hospital for the insane, and locked away without trial. But crusading journalist Mabel Norris Reese cannot stop fretting over the case and its baffling outcome. Who was protecting whom, or what? She pursues the story for years, chasing down leads, hitting dead ends, winning unlikely allies. Bit by bit, the unspeakable truths behind a conspiracy that shocked a community into silence begin to surface. Beneath a Ruthless Sun tells a powerful, page-turning story rooted in the fears that rippled through the South as integration began to take hold, sparking a surge of virulent racism that savaged the vulnerable, debased the powerful, and roils our own times still.
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Author: Meg Greene

Publisher: Greenwood

ISBN: 1440828989

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 172

View: 7055

Readers seeking information about Elena Kagan—from her early life and her ascent to the Supreme Court to how she approaches questions of fairness, justice, equality, and civil rights—will find this biography engaging and invaluable. • Presents a clear overview of Kagan's legal thought and writings that reveals the basic tenets of her philosophies • Documents Kagan's accomplishments while serving as dean of Harvard Law School and her rise to the bench of the U.S. Supreme Court, giving readers a clear understanding of the steps and circumstances throughout her successful career • Illustrates the important differences and similarities between Kagan and recent court appointee Sonia Sotomayor • Provides a complete bibliography that will direct students to the most important print and electronic sources of additional information about Kagan
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The Jurisprudence of Constitutional Restoration

Author: Ralph A. Rossum

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780700619481

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 295

View: 5648

The first thorough, well-documented, and fair-minded evaluation of Justice Thomas's 500 written opinions during 25 years on the Supreme Court, and, the most complete examination of his consistent original general meaning approach to constitutional interpretation.
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Washington and the Politics of Change in the 1960s

Author: Robert Weisbrot,G. Calvin Mackenzie

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 1440637512

Category: History

Page: 448

View: 6140

An engaging be hind-the-scenes look at the lesser-known forces that fueled the profound social reforms of the 1960s Provocative and incisive , The Liberal Hour reveals how Washington, so often portrayed as a target of reform in the 1960s, was in fact the era's most effective engine of change. The movements of the 1960s have always drawn the most attention from the decade's chroniclers, but it was in the halls of government-so often the target of protesters' wrath-that the enduring reforms of the era were produced. With nuance and panache, Calvin Mackenzie and Robert Weisbrot present the real-life characters-from giants like JFK and Johnson to lesser-known senators and congressmen-who drove these reforms and were critical to the passage of key legislation. The Liberal Hour offers an engrossing portrait of this extraordinary moment when more progressive legislation was passed than in almost any other era in American history.
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Author: Mark Twain

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 1101907703

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 984

View: 9539

" ... More than 150 texts that showcase the dazzling range of [Mark Twain's] interests and passions, including selected essays, speeches, letters and excerpts from his Autobiography."--Jacket flap.
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The Life and Constitution of Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia

Author: Joan Biskupic

Publisher: Sarah Crichton Books

ISBN: 9781429990011

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 448

View: 9017

The first full-scale biography of the Supreme Court's most provocative—and influential—justice If the U.S. Supreme Court teaches us anything, it is that almost everything is open to interpretation. Almost. But what's inarguable is that, while the Court has witnessed a succession of larger-than-life jurists in its two-hundred-year-plus history, it has never seen the likes of Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia. Combative yet captivating, infuriating yet charming, the outspoken jurist remains a source of curiosity to observers across the political spectrum and on both sides of the ideological divide. And after nearly a quarter century on the bench, Scalia may be at the apex of his power. Agree with him or not, Scalia is "the justice who has had the most important impact over the years on how we think and talk about the law," as the Harvard law dean Elena Kagan, now U.S. Solicitor General, once put it. Scalia electrifies audiences: to hear him speak is to remember him; to read his writing is to find his phrases permanently affixed in one's mind. But for all his public grandstanding, Scalia has managed to elude biographers—until now. In American Original: The Life and Constitution of Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia, the veteran Washington journalist Joan Biskupic presents for the first time a detailed portrait of this complicated figure and provides a comprehensive narrative that will engage Scalia's adherents and critics alike. Drawing on her long tenure covering the Court, and on unprecedented access to the justice, Biskupic delves into the circumstances of his rise and the formation of his rigorous approach to the bench. Beginning with the influence of Scalia's childhood in a first-generation Italian American home, American Original takes us through his formative years, his role in the Nixon-Ford administrations, and his trajectory through the Reagan revolution. Biskupic's careful reporting culminates with the tumult of the contemporary Supreme Court—where it was and where it's going, with Scalia helping to lead the charge. Even as Democrats control the current executive and legislative branches, the judicial branch remains rooted in conservatism. President Obama will likely appoint several new justices to the Court—but it could be years before those appointees change the tenor of the law. With his keen mind, authoritarian bent, and contentious rhetorical style, Scalia is a distinct and persuasive presence, and his tenure is far from over. This new book shows us the man in power: his world, his journey, and the far-reaching consequences of the transformed legal landscape.
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Mary Church Terrell and the Struggle for Racial Justice in the Nation's Capital

Author: Joan Quigley

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199371512

Category: African American women civil rights workers

Page: 320

View: 5113

In January of 1950, Mary Church Terrell, an 86-year-old charter member of the NAACP, headed into Thompson's Restaurant, just a few blocks from the White House, and requested to be served. She and her companions were informed by the manager that they could not eat in his establishment, because they were "colored." Terrell, a former suffragette and one of the country's first college-educated African American women, took the matter to court. Three years later, the Supreme Court vindicated her outrage: District of Columbia v. John R. Thompson Co., Inc. was decided in June 1953, invalidating the segregation of restaurants and cafes in the nation's capital. In Just Another Southern Town, Joan Quigley recounts an untold chapter of the civil rights movement: an epic battle to topple segregation in Washington, the symbolic home of American democracy. At the book's heart is the formidable Mary Church Terrell and the test case she mounts seeking to enforce Reconstruction-era laws prohibiting segregation in D.C. restaurants. Through the prism of Terrell's story, Quigley reassesses Washington's relationship to civil rights history, bringing to life a pivotal fight for equality that erupted five years before Rosa Parks refused to move to the back of a Montgomery bus and a decade before the student sit-in movement rocked segregated lunch counters across the South. At a time when most civil rights scholarship begins with Brown v. Board of Education, Just Another Southern Town unearths the story of the nation's capital as an early flashpoint on race. A rich portrait of American politics and society in the mid-20th century, it interweaves Terrell's narrative with the courtroom drama of the case and the varied personalities of the justices who ultimately voted unanimously to prohibit segregated restaurants. Resonating with gestures of courage and indignation that radiate from the capital's streets and sidewalks to its marble-clad seats of power, this work restores Mary Church Terrell and the case that launched a crusade to their rightful place in the pantheon of civil rights history.
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A Radical Democratic Vision

Author: Barbara Ransby

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

ISBN: 0807827789

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 470

View: 3805

A stirring new portrait of one of the most important black leaders of the twentieth century introduces readers to the fiery woman who inspired generations of activists. (Social Science)
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Thurgood Marshall and the Supreme Court, 1961-1991

Author: Mark V. Tushnet

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN: 0195093143

Category: Law

Page: 246

View: 524

Following on Making Civil Rights Law, which covered Thurgood Marshall's career from 1936-1961, this book focuses on Marshall's career on the Supreme Court from 1961-1991, where he was first Afro-American Justice. The first book on Justice Thurgood Marshall's years on the Supreme Court based on a comprehensive review of the Supreme Court papers of Justices Marshall and William J. Brennan, this work describes Marshall's special approach to constitutional law in areas ranging from civil rights and the death penalty to abortion and poverty. It also describes the Supreme Court's operations during Marshall's tenure, the relations among the justices, and the particular roles played by Chief Justice Warren Burger, Justice Brennan, and Justice Antonin Scalia. The book locates the Supreme Court's actions from 1967 to 1991 in a broader historical and political context, explaining how Marshall's liberalism became increasingly isolated on a Court influenced by nation's drift in a more conservative direction.
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Author: Ira Stoll

Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

ISBN: 0547585985

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 274

View: 3412

A controversial portrait of the thirty-fifth president explores his less-recognized roles in promoting anti-communism, tax cuts, free trade, and other agendas that had distinctly conservative stances.
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