Author: Carl Thompson

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1136720804

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 240

View: 2586

An increasingly popular genre – addressing issues of empire, colonialism, post-colonialism, globalization, gender and politics – travel writing offers the reader a movement between the familiar and the unknown. In this volume, Carl Thompson: introduces the genre, outlining competing definitions and key debates provides a broad historical survey from the medieval period to the present day explores the autobiographical dimensions of the form looks at both men and women’s travel writing, surveying a range of canonical and more marginal works, drawn from both the colonial and postcolonial era utilises both British and American travelogues to consider the genre's role in shaping the history of both nations. Concise and practical, Travel Writing is the ideal introduction for those new to the subject, as well as a crucial overview of current debates in the field.
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Author: Tim Youngs

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521786522

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 343

View: 1823

Traces the history of travel writing from the sixteenth century to the present, looks at areas around the world historically conducive to writing, and examines travel writing in conjunction with gender, ethnography, and theory.
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Author: Casey Blanton

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1136745653

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 176

View: 3700

Blanton follows the development of travel writing from classical times to the present, focusing in particular on Anglo-American travel writing since the eighteenth century. He identifies significant theoretical and critical contributions to the field, and also examines key texts by James Boswell, Mary Kingsley, Graham Greene, Peter Mathiessen, V.S. Naipaul, and Bruce Chatwin.
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Author: Tim Youngs

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521874475

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 240

View: 1160

Surveying various works of travel literature, this text argues that travel writing redefines the myriad genres it often comprises.
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Author: Alfred Bendixen,Judith Hamera

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521861098

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 301

View: 3867

A stimulating overview of American journeys from the eighteenth century to the present.
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Author: Andrew Bennett

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134461348

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 160

View: 7312

This volume investigates the changing definitions of the author, what it has meant historically to be an 'author', and the impact that this has had on literary culture. Andrew Bennett presents a clearly-structured discussion of the various theoretical debates surrounding authorship, exploring such concepts as authority, ownership, originality, and the 'death' of the author. Accessible, yet stimulating, this study offers the ideal introduction to a core notion in critical theory.
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Author: Peter Womack

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 1134331843

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 176

View: 6160

Dialogue is a many-sided critical concept; at once an ancient philosophical genre, a formal component of fiction and drama, a model for the relationship of writer and reader, and a theoretical key to the nature of language. In all its forms, it questions ‘literature’, disturbing the singleness and fixity of the written text with the fluid interactivity of conversation. In this clear and concise guide to the multiple significance of the term, Peter Womack: outlines the history of dialogue form, looking at Platonic, Renaissance, Enlightenment and Modern examples illustrates the play of dialogue in the many ‘voices’ of the novel, and considers how dialogue works on the stage interprets the influential dialogic theories of Mikhail Bakhtin examines the idea that literary study itself consists of a ‘dialogue’ with the past presents a useful glossary and further reading section. Practical and thought-provoking, this volume is the ideal starting-point for the exploration of this diverse and fascinating literary form.
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Author: John Frow

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317693213

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 204

View: 8979

This second edition of John Frow’s Genre offers a comprehensive and accessible introduction to the area. Genre is a key means by which we categorize the many forms of literature and culture, but it is also much more than that: in talk and writing, in music and images, in film and television, genres actively generate and shape our knowledge of the world. Understanding genre as a dynamic process rather than a set of stable rules, this book explores: the relation of simple to complex genres the history of literary genre in theory the generic organisation of implied meanings the structuring of interpretation by genre the uses of genre in teaching. John Frow’s lucid exploration of this fascinating concept has become essential reading for students of literary and cultural studies, and the second edition expands on the original to take account of recent debates in genre theory and the emergence of digital genres.
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Author: Tony Davies

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134836120

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 160

View: 6471

Definitions of humanism as educational movement, philosophical concept or existential ‘life stance’ have evolved over the centuries as the term has been adopted for a variety of cultural and political purposes and contexts, and reactions against humanism have contributed to movements such as structuralism, postmodernism and postcolonialism. Tony Davies offers a clear introduction to the many uses of this influential yet complex concept, and this second edition extends his discussion to include: a wide-ranging history of the development of the term and its influences the implications of debates around humanism and post-humanism for political, religious and environmental activism discussion of the key figures in humanist debate from Erasmus and Milton to Heidegger, Foucault and Chomsky
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Author: Andrew McCarthy,Jason Wilson

Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

ISBN: 0544579283

Category: Travel

Page: 336

View: 9921

In his introduction, guest editor Andrew McCarthy says that the best travel writing is “the anonymous and solitary traveler capturing a moment in time and place, giving meaning to his or her travels.” The stories in The Best American Travel Writing 2015 demonstrate just that spirit, whether it is the story of a marine returning to Iraq a decade after his deployment, a writer retracing the footsteps of humanity as it spread from Africa throughout the world, or looking for love on a physics-themed cruise down the Rhone River. No matter what the subject, the writers featured in this volume boldly call out, “Yes, this matters. Follow me!” The Best American Travel Writing 2015 includes Iris Smyles, Paul Theroux, Christopher Solomon Patricia Marx, Kevin Baker, Benjamin Busch, Maud Newton Gary Shteyngart, Paul Salopek, and others ANDREW MCCARTHY, guest editor, is the author of the New York Times best-selling travel memoir The Longest Way Home. He has served as an editor at large at National Geographic Traveler and been named travel journalist of the year by the Society of American Travel Writers. He is also an actor and director. JASON WILSON, series editor, is the author of Boozehound: On the Trail of the Rare, the Obscure, and the Overrated in Spirits and the digital wine series Planet of the Grapes. He has written for the Washington Post, the Boston Globe, the Philadelphia Daily News, and many other publications. He is the founding editor of The Smart Set and Table Matters.
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Author: Scott Brewster

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134363893

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 176

View: 1060

The term ‘lyric’ has evolved, been revised, redefined and contested over the centuries. In this fascinating introduction, Scott Brewster: traces the history of the term from its classical origins through the early modern, Romantic and Victorian periods and up to the twenty-first century demonstrates the influence of lyric on poetic practice, literature, music and other popular cultural forms uses three aspects -- the lyric ‘self’, love and desire and the relationship between lyric, poetry and performance -- as focal points for further discussion not only charts the history of lyric theory and practice but re-examines assumptions about the lyric form in the context of recent theoretical accounts of poetic discourse. Offering clarity and structure to this often intense and emotive field, Lyric offers essential insights for students of literature, performance, music and cultural studies.
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Author: Paul Hamilton

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134437811

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 240

View: 4754

Historicism is the essential introduction to the field, providing its readers with the necessary knowledge, background and vocabulary to apply it in their own studies. Paul Hamilton's compact and comprehensive guide: * explains the theory and basics of historicism * presents a history of the term and its uses * introduces the reader to the key thinkers in the field, from ancient Greece to modern times * considers historicism in contemporary debates and its relevance to other modes of criticism, such as feminism and post-colonialism * contains an extensive bibliography of further reading.
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Critical Reflections on Contemporary Travel Writing

Author: Patrick Holland,Graham Huggan

Publisher: University of Michigan Press

ISBN: 9780472087068

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 261

View: 4741

Looks at how contemporary travel writing reflects gender, cultural history, and social class
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Author: Linda Anderson

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1136845534

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 176

View: 8706

If every writer necessarily draws on their own life, is any writing outside the realm of ‘autobiography’? The new edition of this classic guide is fully updated to include: developments in autobiographical criticism, highlighting major theoretical issues and concepts different forms of the genre from confessions and narratives to memoirs and diaries uses of the genre in their historical and cultural contexts major autobiographical writers including St Augustine, Bunyan, Boswell, Rousseau and Wordsworth, alongside non-canonical autobiographies by women twentieth-century autobiography including women's writing, black and postcolonial writing, and personal criticism a new chapter on narrative and new material examining recent trends in autobiography such as blogs, the popularity of literary memoirs and recent developments in theory on testimonial writing. Combining theoretical discussion with thought-provoking readings of major texts, this is the ideal introduction to the study of a fascinating genre.
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Author: Barbara Fuchs

Publisher: Psychology Press

ISBN: 041521260X

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 146

View: 1064

Often derided as an inferior form of literature, 'romance' as a literary mode or genre defies satisfactory definition, dividing critics, scholars and readers alike. This useful guidebook traces the myriad transformations of 'romance' from medieval courtly love to Mills and Boon, and claims that its elusive and complex nature serves as a touchstone for larger questions of literary and cultural theory, such as: How does the history of 'romance' as a category force us to rethink the historicization of literary genres? What definitions can we provide for our own time to help us recognize and analyze new forms of 'romance'? To what extent is the resistance to romance a resistance to the imaginative force of literature? The case for 'romance' as a concept is presented clearly and imaginatively, arguing that its usefulness to contemporary critics can be maintained if it is regarded as a literary strategy rather than a fixed genre. In encouraging the reader to consider the fluidity of literature, Romance will be of equal value to all students of historical and comparative literatures and of modern literary forms.
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Travel Writing and Transculturation

Author: Mary Louise Pratt

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134071930

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 296

View: 6629

Updated and expanded throughout with new illustrations and new material, this is the long- awaited second edition of a highly acclaimed and interdisciplinary book which quickly established itself as a seminal text in its field.
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Author: Laurence Coupe

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134107765

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 240

View: 9728

Laurence Coupe offers students a comprehensive overview of the development of myth, showing how mythic themes, structures and symbols persist in literature and entertainment today. This introductory volume: illustrates the relation between myth, culture and literature with discussions of poetry, fiction, film and popular song explores uses made of the term ‘myth’ within the fields of literary criticism, anthropology, cultural studies, feminism, Marxism and psychoanalysis discusses the association between modernism, postmodernism, myth and history familiarizes the reader with themes such as the dying god, the quest for the Grail, the relation between ‘chaos’ and ‘cosmos’, and the vision of the end of time demonstrates the growing importance of the green dimension of myth. Fully updated and revised in this new edition, Myth is both a concise introduction and a useful tool to students first approaching the topic, while also a valuable contribution to the study of myth.
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Author: Donald Eugene Hall

Publisher: Psychology Press

ISBN: 9780415287616

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 144

View: 456

Explores the history of theories of selfhood, from the Classical era to the present, and demonstrates how those theories can be applied in literary and cultural criticism. Donald E. Hall: * examines all of the major methodologies and theoretical emphases of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, including psychoanalytic criticism, materialism, feminism and queer theory * applies the theories discussed in detailed readings of literary and cultural texts, from novels and poetry to film and the visual arts * offers a unique perspective on our current obsession with perfecting our selves * looks to the future of selfhood given the new identity possibilities arising out of developing technologies. Examining some of the most exciting issues confronting cultural critics and readers today, Subjectivity is the essential introduction to a fraught but crucial critical term and a challenge to the way we define our selves.
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Author: Jerome De Groot

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780415426626

Category: History

Page: 200

View: 6658

The historical novel is an enduringly popular genre that raises crucial questions about key literary concepts, fact and fiction, identity, history, reading, and writing. In this comprehensive, focused guide, Jerome de Groot offers an accessible introduction to the genre and critical debates that surround it, including: the development of the historical novel from early eighteenth-century works through to postmodern and contemporary historical fiction different genres, such as sensational or 'low' fiction, crime novels, literary works, counterfactual writing and related issues of audience, value, and authenticity the many functions of historical fiction, particularly the challenges it poses to accepted histories and postmodern questioning of 'grand narratives' the relationship of the historical novel to the wider cultural sphere with reference to historical theory, the internet, television, and film key theoretical concepts such as the authentic fallacy, postcolonialism, Marxism, queer and feminist reading. Drawing on a wide range of examples from across the centuries and around the globe The Historical Novel is essential reading for students exploring the interface of history and fiction.
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1500 Years of African and Asian Travel Writing

Author: Tabish Khair

Publisher: Signal Books

ISBN: 9781904955115

Category: Africans

Page: 421

View: 2824

The collection includes pilgrimage accounts, which describe a 'national' circuit (as in Lady Nijo's, c. 1280, or Sei Shonagon's, c. 990, accounts) or move across vast regions to places of learning and pilgrimage or to a particular centre of religio-cultural significance (the early Chinese travellers to India in the fifth, sixth and seventh centuries, the Hajj pilgrimage of Ibn Jubayr in the 12th century, Blyden's Africanist-Christian pilgrimage to the Holy Land in the 19th century). These pilgrimage accounts can also taper into other genres: for instance, while ibn Battutah (b. 1304) set out to go to Mecca (which he did), he ended up travelling across 50 countries and dictating what is undoubtedly a travel book in a narrow generic sense rather than the account of a pilgrimage. Other extracts range from the influential medieval travel-geography of al-Idrisi in the 11th century; the global history,
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