Author: Eleri Lynn

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 0300228279

Category: Clothing and dress

Page: 208

View: 3303

Introduction -- The Tudor wardrobe -- Power and meaning : royal dress -- Dressed for court : courtiers, officials and servants -- Grooming and laundry -- The great wardrobe -- The legacy of tudor dress
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Author: Maria Hayward

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1351569171

Category: History

Page: 488

View: 3899

Henry VIII used his wardrobe, and that of his family and household, as a way of expressing his wealth and magnificence. This book encompasses the first detailed study of male and female dress worn at the court of Henry VIII (1509-47) and covers the dress of the king and his immediate family, the royal household and the broader court circle. Henry VIII's wardrobe is set in context by a study of Henry VII's clothes, court and household. ~ ~ As none of Henry VIII's clothes survive, evidence is drawn primarily from the great wardrobe accounts, wardrobe warrants, and inventories, and is interpreted using evidence from narrative sources, paintings, drawings and a small selection of contemporary garments, mainly from European collections. ~ ~ Key areas for consideration include the king's personal wardrobe, how Henry VIII's queens used their clothes to define their status, the textiles provided for the pattern of royal coronations, marriages and funerals and the role of the great wardrobe, wardrobe of the robes and laundry. In addition there is information on the cut and construction of garments, materials and colours, dr given as gifts, the function of livery and the hierarchy of dress within the royal household, and the network of craftsmen working for the court. The text is accompanied by full transcripts of James Worsley's wardrobe books of 1516 and 1521 which provide a brief glimpse of the king's clothes.
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Author: Herbert Norris

Publisher: Courier Corporation

ISBN: 0486141519

Category: Antiques & Collectibles

Page: 920

View: 3744

Monumental study of English fashions from 1485 through 1603 surveys clothing worn by all classes and includes headgear, hairstyles, jewelry, collars, footwear, and other accessories. 1,000 black-and-white figures. 24 halftones. 22 color plates.
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Author: N. Bradfield

Publisher: Read Books Ltd

ISBN: 147334137X

Category: Antiques & Collectibles

Page: 160

View: 5831

This vintage book contains a comprehensive account of clothing fashions and trends from the eleventh century to the twentieth century. It contains detailed descriptions, fascinating historical information, and illustrations copied from contemporary paintings, engravings and tapestries, monumental brasses and effigies, photographs, and the actual dresses. Contents include: "William the Conqueror (1066-1087)", "William Rufus (1087-1100)", "Women's Fashions (1066-1100)", "Henry I and Stephen (1100-1154)", "Women's Fashions (1100-1114)", "Henry II ad Richard (1134-1199)", "Women's Fashions (1154-1199)", "John and Henry III (1199-1272)", et cetera. Many vintage books such as this are increasingly scarce and expensive. We are republishing this volume now Many vintage books such as this are increasingly scarce and expensive. We are republishing this volume now in an affordable, modern, high-quality edition complete with its original artwork and text.
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Reconstructing 16th-century Dress

Author: Ninya Mikhaila,Jane Malcolm-Davies

Publisher: Costume & Fashion Press

ISBN: 9780896762558

Category: Crafts & Hobbies

Page: 160

View: 4249

Essential source book for reconstructing clothing 1509 to 1603.
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Author: Camille Bonnard

Publisher: Courier Corporation

ISBN: 0486134261

Category: Crafts & Hobbies

Page: 128

View: 2025

This illustrated study displays a detailed gallery of costumes worn in the 11th through the 15th centuries. The 120 full-color plates exhibit apparel worn by nobility, knights, soldiers, the bourgeois, ecclesiastics, and citizens of all classes.
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Author: Janet Arnold

Publisher: Maney Pub

ISBN: 9781909662537

Category: Crafts & Hobbies

Page: 392

View: 4877

The vast wardrobe of Queen Elizabeth I is legendary: in her own time some of the richly embroidered gowns were displayed with other treasures to dazzle the eyes of foreign visitors to the Tower of London. The quantity of clothes recorded in the inventories taken in 1600 would seem to suggest sheer vanity, but a survey of work carried out in the Wardrobe of Robes throughout the reign reveals a different picture. It is one of careful organisation and economy. This copiously annotated work is illustrated with photographs of portraits, miniatures, tomb sculptures, engravings, woven textiles and embroideries. Two indexes are provided, the first of paintings, persons, places, and events, while the second, partly a glossary, enables the reader to quickly trace information on fashionable dress and accessories. An invaluable reference for students of the history of dress and embroidery, for social historians, for art historians working in the field of portraiture, and those with a general interest in the period. Case-bound in cloth with dust jacket.
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Author: Terry Breverton

Publisher: Amberley Publishing Limited

ISBN: 1445638452

Category: History

Page: 336

View: 2207

The Tudor family is the most intriguing royal dynasty in British history. Their era took us out of the Middle Ages through the Renaissance, founded the British Empire and made Britain a world power for the first time. The flowering of literature and music was unprecedented in British history. And what a family! From Henry VII who usurped Richard III at the Battle of Bosworth, through his famous son whose multiple marriages led to the break with the Roman Church, to the brilliant reign of Henry VIII's and Anne Boleyn's daughter, Elizabeth I, we see over a century of people and events that sometimes seem more fiction than reality. Did Henry VIII compose Greensleeves? What were Thomas Cromwell's bizarre toilet habits? Did Anne Boleyn have six fingers on one hand? We all know the old nursery rhyme: Mary, Mary, quite contrary, How does your garden grow? With silver bells and cockle shells, And pretty maids all in a row. Did you know that this is Mary Tudor, and her garden is an allusion to graveyards which were increasing in size with those who dared stay Protestant? The silver bells and cockle shells were instruments of torture, and the maids were a form of guillotine. For details of these, and many more entertaining Tudor facts, just open this book.
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1564–1616

Author: Sarah Jane Downing

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 1784420123

Category: Design

Page: 72

View: 2131

Garments and accessories are prominent in almost all of William Shakespeare's plays, from Hamlet and Othello to A Midsummer Night's Dream and Twelfth Night. The statement 'Clothes maketh the man' was one that would have resonated with their audiences: the rise of England's merchant class had made issues of rank central to Elizabethan debate, and a rigid table of sumptuary laws carefully regulated the sorts of fabric and garment worn by the different classes. From the etiquette of courtly dress to the evolution of the Elizabethan ruff, in this vibrant introduction Sarah Jane Downing explores the sartorial world of the late-16th century, why people wore the clothes they did, and how the dizzyingly eclectic range of fashions (including ruffs, rebatos and French farthingales) transformed over time.
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Dress, Textiles, and Innovation in Europe, 1500-1800

Author: Evelyn Welch

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 9780198738176

Category:

Page: 400

View: 6403

How did fashion work in Europe before modern media? Why were beards suddenly stylish after 1500? Why did the ruff come in and out of use in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries? Why did men from Spain to Sweden suddenly decide to adopt wigs around 1660 only to drop them less than fifty years later? How did manufacturers and merchants encourage and then respond to changing demands for colourful printed patterns and new cuts and styles of tailoring in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries? As importantly, why were others unsuccessful in terms of their cross-European adoption? This book explores the ways in which men, women, state industries, guilds and entrepreneurs in early modern Europe created, innovated and promoted new textiles, novel products and unusual forms of dress. Challenging conventional explanations that explain fashion as spreading from the court elite downwards, it demonstrates the complexity of the relationships that made fashions successful.
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Uncovering the Secrets of Britain’s Greatest Dynasty

Author: Tracy Borman

Publisher: Grove/Atlantic, Inc.

ISBN: 0802189806

Category: History

Page: 464

View: 9193

England’s Tudor monarchs—Henry VII, Henry VIII, Edward VI, Mary I, and Elizabeth I—are perhaps the most celebrated and fascinating of all royal families in history. Their love affairs, their political triumphs, and their overturning of the religious order are the subject of countless works of popular scholarship. But for all we know about Henry’s quest for male heirs, or Elizabeth’s purported virginity, the lives of the Tudor monarchs away from the public eye remain largely beyond our grasp, mostly not chronicled by previous historians. In The Private Lives of the Tudors, acclaimed historian Tracy Borman delves deep behind the public face of the monarchs, showing us what their lives were like beyond the stage of the court. Drawing on original material from those closest to them—courtiers like the “groom of the stool,” a much-coveted position, surprisingly—Borman examines Tudor life in fine detail. What did the monarchs eat? What clothes did they wear, and how were they designed, bought, and cared for? How did they wield power? When sick, how were they treated? What games did they play? How did they practice their faith? And whom did they love, and how did they give birth to the all-important heirs? Exploring their education, upbringing, sexual lives, and taking us into the kitchens, bathrooms, schoolrooms, and bedrooms at court, The Private Lives of the Tudors charts the course of the entire dynasty, surfacing new and fascinating insights into these celebrated figures.
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A Guide to Changing Fashion from the 16th to the 20th Century

Author: Lydia Edwards

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 1474286259

Category: Crafts & Hobbies

Page: 216

View: 9613

Fashion is ever-changing, and while some styles mark a dramatic departure from the past, many exhibit subtle differences from year to year that are not always easily identifiable. With overviews of each key period and detailed illustrations for each new style, How to Read a Dress is an authoritative visual guide to women's fashion across five centuries. Each entry includes annotated color images of historical garments, outlining important features and highlighting how styles have developed over time, whether in shape, fabric choice, trimming, or undergarments. Readers will learn how garments were constructed and where their inspiration stemmed from at key points in history – as well as how dresses have varied in type, cut, detailing and popularity according to the occasion and the class, age and social status of the wearer. This lavishly illustrated book is the ideal tool for anyone who has ever wanted to know their cartridge pleats from their Récamier ruffles. Equipping the reader with all the information they need to 'read' a dress, this is the ultimate guide for students, researchers, and anyone interested in historical fashion.
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Kings and Queens Rediscovered

Author: Tarnya Cooper,Charlotte Bolland

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781855144927

Category: Great Britain

Page: 176

View: 6515

Who were the Tudor kings and queens and what did they really look like? Mention Henry VIII and the familiar image of the rotund, bearded fellow of Hans Holbein the Youngers portraits immediately springs to mind reinforced, perhaps, by memories of a monochromatic Charles Laughton wielding a chicken leg in a fanciful biopic. With Elizabeth I its frilly ruffs, white make-up and pink lips in fact, just as she appears in a number of very well-known portraits held in the Collection of the National Portrait Gallery in London. But the familiarity of these representations has overshadowed the other images of the Tudor monarchs that were produced throughout their reigns. During the sixteenth century the market for portraits grew and so the monarchs images multiplied as countless versions and copies of their likeness were produced to satisfy demand. Taken together, these images chart both the changing iconography of the ruler and the development of portrait painting in England. In considering the context in which these portraits were made, the motivations of the sitters and the artists who made them, the purposes to which they were put, and the physical transformations and interventions they have undergone in the intervening five centuries, the authors present a compelling and illuminating investigation into the portraiture of the Tudor monarchs.
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Clothing and Culture 1485 to 1625

Author: Jane Huggett,Ninya Mikhaila

Publisher: Costume & Fashion Press

ISBN: 9780896762671

Category: Crafts & Hobbies

Page: 160

View: 5046

This book provides a social history of babies and children from the late fifteenth century to the Jacobean era. The book offers fascinating insights into the conventions of children's dress, including swaddling infants, boys in skirts and stiffened bodices for young girls.
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Author: Françoise Piponnier,Perrine Mane

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780300086911

Category: Design

Page: 167

View: 1700

This absorbing survey of medieval clothing makes an important and unique contribution to our understanding of the cultural and social conditions of western Europe in the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries. Drawing on paintings and sculpture, documents and literature, surviving clothing, textiles, jewelry, and armor, Françoise Piponnier and Perrine Mane show that garments and accessories of the middle ages reveal much about life and society of the time. The authors examine the sources for clothing: what clothes were made of, why, and from where the materials came. They provide a chronology of changes in western European dress during the period, investigating the development and spread of "fashion." They explore the differences between the clothing of men and women, explaining that changes in fashion for women were less spectacular than those for men because of the secondary position of women in medieval society. The authors also discuss the changing significance of clothing to people as they progressed through life, how clothing related to status, the varied work attire of such professionals as lawyers, academics, and members of religious orders, and the clothing of carnival and disguise. Elegantly written and attractively presented, the book will be of interest not only to students of medieval history but also to anyone fascinated by clothes and fashion.
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Tudor Treatments and Ailments of Henry VIII

Author: Seamus O'Caellaigh

Publisher: Madeglobal Publishing

ISBN: 9788494729843

Category: History

Page: 132

View: 8515

Henry VIII lived for 55 years and had many health issues, particularly towards the end of his reign. Packed with glorious full-colour photos of the illnesses and treatments Henry VIII used, alongside primary source documents, this book is a treat for the eyes and is full of information for those with a love of all things Tudor.
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Portrait Painting and the Urban Elite of Tudor and Jacobean England and Wales

Author: Tarnya Cooper

Publisher: Paul Mellon Ctr for Studies

ISBN: 9780300162790

Category: Art

Page: 251

View: 6821

For much of early modern history, the opportunity to be immortalized in a portrait was explicitly tied to social class: only landed elite and royalty had the money and power to commission such an endeavor. But in the second half of the 16th century, access began to widen to the urban middle class, including merchants, lawyers, physicians, clergy, writers, and musicians. As portraiture proliferated in English cities and towns, the middle class gained social visibility—not just for themselves as individuals, but for their entire class or industry. In Citizen Portrait, Tarnya Cooper examines the patronage and production of portraits in Tudor and Jacobean England, focusing on the motivations of those who chose to be painted and the impact of the resulting images. Highlighting the opposing, yet common, themes of piety and self-promotion, Cooper has revealed a fresh area of interest for scholars of early modern British art.
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Clothing and the Law in Henry VIII's England

Author: Maria Hayward

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1351903195

Category: History

Page: 448

View: 1009

English dress in the second half of the sixteenth century has been studied in depth, yet remarkably little has been written on the earlier years, or indeed on male clothing for the whole century. The few studies that do cover these neglected areas have tended to be quite general, focusing upon garments rather than the wearers. As such this present volume fills an important gap by providing a detailed analysis of not only what people wore in Henry's reign, but why. The book describes and analyses dress in England through a variety of documents, including warrants and accounts from Henry's Great Wardrobe and the royal household, contemporary narrative sources, legislation enacted by Parliament, guild regulations, inventories and wills, supported with evidence and observations derived from visual sources and surviving garments. Whilst all these sources are utilised, the main focus of the study is built around the sumptuary legislation, or the four 'Acts of Apparel' passed by Henry between 1509 and 1547. English sumptuary legislation was concerned primarily with male dress, and starting at the top of society with the king and his immediate family, it worked its way down through the social hierarchy, but stopped short of the poor who did not have sufficient disposable income to afford the items under consideration. Certain groups - such as women and the clergy - who were specifically excluded from the legislation, are examined in the second half of the book. Combining the consideration of such primary sources with modern scholarly analysis, this book is invaluable for anyone with an interest in the history of fashion, clothing, and consumption in Tudor society.
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