Portrait of a Moroccan

Author: Vincent Crapanzano

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 022619146X

Category: Social Science

Page: 204

View: 8840

Tuhami is an illiterate Moroccan tilemaker who believes himself married to a camel-footed she-demon. A master of magic and a superb story-teller, Tuhami lives in a dank, windowless hovel near the kiln where he works. Nightly he suffers visitations from the demons and saints who haunt his life, and he seeks, with crippling ambivalence, liberation from 'A'isha Qandisha, the she-demon. In a sensitive and bold experiment in interpretive ethnography, Crapanzano presents Tuhami's bizarre account of himself and his world. In so doing, Crapanzano draws on phenomenology, psychoanalysis, and symbolism to reflect upon the nature of reality and truth and to probe the limits of anthropology itself. Tuhami has become one of the most important and widely cited representatives of a new understanding of the whole discipline of anthropology.
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A Study in Moroccan Ethnopsychiatry

Author: Vincent Crapanzano

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 9780520022416

Category: Hạmadsha

Page: 258

View: 8917

The Hamadsha are members of a loosely and diversely organized religious brotherhood, or confraternity, which traces its spiritual heritage back to two Moroccan saints of the late seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries, Sidi 'Ali ben Hamdush and Sidi Ahmed Dghughi. Despite a certain notoriety due to their head-slashing and other practices of self-mutilation, the Hamadsha have received comparatively little attention in the literature, ethnographic or other, on Morocco and North Africa.
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Author: Vincent Crapanzano

Publisher: Other Press, LLC

ISBN: 1590515943

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 400

View: 7252

A distinguished anthropologist tells his life story as a wistful novelist would, watching himself as if he were someone else This memoir recaptures meaningful moments from the author’s life: as his childhood on the grounds of a psychiatric hospital, his psychiatrist father’s early death, his years at school in Switzerland and then at Harvard in the 1960s, his love affairs, his own teaching, and his far-flung travels. Taken together, these stories have the power of a nothing-taken-for-granted vision, fighting those conventions and ideologies that deaden the creative and inquiring mind.
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Die heiligen und profanen Erinnerungen des Captain Charles Ryder

Author: Evelyn Waugh

Publisher: Diogenes Verlag AG

ISBN: 3257603436

Category: Fiction

Page: 464

View: 2534

›Wiedersehen mit Brideshead‹ ist das englische Gegenstück zum amerikanischen ›Großen Gatsby‹: das Porträt der Schönen und Reichen in den Jahren zwischen den Weltkriegen, die Chronik einer Vertreibung aus dem Paradies bei Anbruch der modernen Zeit – und die Geschichte einer unmöglichen Liebe.
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Portrait of a Navajo

Author: Vincent Crapanzano

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN: 9780803264311

Category: Social Science

Page: 245

View: 6523

It is told that the ancestors of the Navajos journeyed through four worlds to reach the fifth, or present, one. The pressing complexities and underlying wonder of their fifth world of modern reservation life are portrayed in this classic ethnographic account by Vincent Crapanzano. ø As a young, inexperienced anthropologist, Crapanzano spent a summer with a Navajo man he calls Forster Bennett. In his fifties, Bennett was raised during the early reservation years, fought in the South Pacific in the Second World War, and, like many, carried a deep but not always openly expressed resentment toward whites. Crapanzano?s honest and gritty account of his time with Bennett and Bennett's community reveals a stark portrait of the ?flat, slow quality of reservation life,? where boredom and poverty coexist with age-old sacred rituals and the varying ways that Navajos react and adjust to changes in their culture.
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A Survival Guide to Customs and Etiquette

Author: Orin Hargraves

Publisher: Marshall Cavendish

ISBN: 9814435899

Category: Electronic books

Page: 321

View: 2512

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An Essay in Literary-Philosophical Anthropology

Author: Vincent Crapanzano

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226118758

Category: Social Science

Page: 280

View: 7203

How do people make sense of their experiences? How do they understand possibility? How do they limit possibility? These questions are central to all the human sciences. Here, Vincent Crapanzano offers a powerfully creative new way to think about human experience: the notion of imaginative horizons. For Crapanzano, imaginative horizons are the blurry boundaries that separate the here and now from what lies beyond, in time and space. These horizons, he argues, deeply influence both how we experience our lives and how we interpret those experiences, and here sets himself the task of exploring the roles that creativity and imagination play in our experience of the world.
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On the Epistemology of Interpretation

Author: Vincent Crapanzano

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 9780674389816

Category: Social Science

Page: 386

View: 7840

A distinguished anthropologist and a creative force behind postmodern writing in his field, Vincent Crapanzano here focuses his considerable critical powers upon his own culture. In essays that question how the human sciences, particularly anthropology and psychoanalysis, articulate their fields of study, Crapanzano addresses nothing less than the enormous problem of defining the self in both its individual and collective projections.
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Author: Beverly Birns,Dale Hay

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 1489921095

Category: Psychology

Page: 292

View: 1826

The Different Faces of Motherhood began during a conversation between the two editors, developmental psychologists who have spent our professional careers working with infants and very young children. We are well aware of the impor tance of infants to their mothers and of mothers to their infants. However, we were particularly aware of the fact that, whereas our knowledge about infants increases exponentially . each decade, our assumptions about mothers change relatively little. We were concerned about the theories that underlie the advice given to mothers and also about the assumption that mothers appear to be generic. More and more we have learned about individual differences in babies, but not more and more about individual differences in mothers. Our second concern has been to expand our knowledge about mothers. Our assumptions were few and our questions were many. We believed that the experience of women would vary greatly, both in outlook and in behavior, depending on each woman's age, marital status, finan Cial status, ethnicity, health, education and work experience, as well as a wom an's own experience in her family origin and her relationship to her husband. If we are to understand child development and believe that the early years are important in a child's life, then it seems critical to examine our beliefs about mothers. If we are to understand human development, then being a mother is surely an important area of inquiry.
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Personal Narratives from a Swahili Village

Author: Pat Caplan

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134776055

Category: Social Science

Page: 288

View: 1613

African Voices, African Lives explores the world of 'Mohammed', a swahili peasant living on Mafia Island, Tanzania. Through his own words - some written, some spoken - and those of his relatives, including his ex-wife and one of his daughters, he enables us to see the world through his eyes, including the invisisble world of spirits which plays a significant role in his life. This information is gathered by Pat Caplan, the anthropologist, over almost three decades of talking and writing to each other. She acts not only as translator and editor, but also as interpreter, bringing in her own knowledge gathered from field data as well as comparative material from other anthropological work. By utilising a mixture of styles - narrative and life history, ethnographic observation, and the diary kept by Mohammed at the anthropologist's bequest, African Voices African Lives will make an important contribution to current debates in anthropology by grappling with issues raised by 'personal narratives', authorial authority, and with refexivity.
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Toward an Engaged Cultural Criticism

Author: Frances E. Mascia-Lees,Patricia Sharpe

Publisher: SUNY Press

ISBN: 0791491870

Category: Social Science

Page: 254

View: 1668

Ranging across contemporary culture from the academy to shopping malls, this book offers engaged cultural criticism in a postfeminist context.
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Local Realities, Global Relations

Author: Michael M.J. Fischer

Publisher: Fordham Univ Press

ISBN: 0823241890

Category: Religion

Page: 330

View: 6596

Contributions from scholars in anthropology, religion, and area studies--stemming from research in East and Southeast Asia, Africa, Europe, and the Americas collected to represent a form of historically grounded, ethnographically driven social science that seeks to understand social phenomena by dialogically engaging global and local perspectives.
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Fieldwork and Cultural Understanding

Author: David Crawford,Rachel Newcomb

Publisher: Indiana University Press

ISBN: 0253009197

Category: Social Science

Page: 296

View: 6746

Encountering Morocco introduces readers to life in this North African country through vivid accounts of fieldwork as personal experience and intellectual journey. We meet the contributors at diverse stages of their careers–from the unmarried researcher arriving for her first stint in the field to the seasoned fieldworker returning with spouse and children. They offer frank descriptions of what it means to take up residence in a place where one is regarded as an outsider, learn the language and local customs, and struggle to develop rapport. Moving reflections on friendship, kinship, and belief within the cross-cultural encounter reveal why study of Moroccan society has played such a seminal role in the development of cultural anthropology.
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Stories of a Himalayan Hunter

Author: Joseph S. Alter

Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

ISBN: 0812204751

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 216

View: 1791

Dil Das was a poor farmer—an untouchable—living near Mussoorie, a colonial hill station in the Himalayas. As a boy he became acquainted with a number of American missionary children attending a boarding school in town and, over the years, developed close friendships with them and, eventually, with their sons. The basis for these friendships was a common passion for hunting. This passion and the friendships it made possible came to dominate Dil Das's life. When Joseph S. Alter, one of the boys who had hunted with Dil Das, became an adult and a scholar, he set out to write the life history of Dil Das as a way of exploring Garhwali peasant culture. But Alter found his friend uninterested in talking about traditional ethnographic subjects, such as community life, family, or work. Instead, Dil Das spoke almost exclusively about hunting with his American friends—telling endless tales about friendship and hunting that seemed to have nothing to do with peasant culture. When Dil Das died in 1986, Alter put the project away. Years later, he began rereading Dil Das's stories, this time from a completely new perspective. Instead of looking for information about peasant culture, he was able to see that Dil Das was talking against culture. From this viewpoint Dil Das's narrative made sense for precisely those reasons that had earlier seemed to render it useless—his apparent indifference toward details of everyday life, his obsession with hunting, and, above all, his celebration of friendship. To a degree in fact, but most significantly in Dil Das's memory, hunting served to merge his and the missionary boys' identities and, thereby, to supersede and render irrelevant all differences of class, caste, and nationality. For Dil Das the intimate experience of hunting together radically decentered the prevailing structure of power and enabled him to redefine himself outside the framework of normal social classification. Thus, Knowing Dil Das is not about peasant culture but about the limits of culture and history. And it is about the moral ambiguity of writing and living in a field of power where, despite intimacy, self and other are unequal.
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Sufis, Islamists, and Mass Mediation in Urban Morocco

Author: Emilio Spadola

Publisher: Indiana University Press

ISBN: 0253011450

Category: Social Science

Page: 190

View: 2846

The sacred calls that summon believers are the focus of this study of religion and power in Fez, Morocco. Focusing on how dissemination of the call through mass media has transformed understandings of piety and authority, Emilio Spadola details the new importance of once–marginal Sufi practices such as spirit trance and exorcism for ordinary believers, the state, and Islamist movements. The Calls of Islam offers new ethnographic perspectives on ritual, performance, and media in the Muslim world.
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The Wound That Never Heals

Author: Vincent Crapanzano

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 0226118789

Category: Social Science

Page: 248

View: 8310

In this haunting chronicle of betrayal and abandonment, ostracism and exile, racism and humiliation, Vincent Crapanzano examines the story of the Harkis, the quarter of a million Algerian auxiliary troops who fought for the French in Algeria’s war of independence. After tens of thousands of Harkis were massacred by other Algerians at the end of the war, the survivors fled to France where they were placed in camps, some for as long as sixteen years. Condemned as traitors by other Algerians and scorned by the French, the Harkis became a population apart, and their children still suffer from their parents’ wounds. Many have become activists, lobbying for recognition of their parents’ sacrifices, compensation, and an apology. More than just a retelling of the Harkis’ grim past and troubling present, The Harkis is a resonant reflection on how children bear responsibility for the choices their parents make, how personal identity is shaped by the impersonal forces of history, and how violence insinuates itself into every facet of human life.
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The Psychology and Anthropology of Fieldwork Experience

Author: James Davies,Dimitrina Spencer

Publisher: Stanford University Press

ISBN: 0804774269

Category: Social Science

Page: 288

View: 9328

As emotion is often linked with irrationality, it's no surprise researchers tend to underreport the emotions they experience in the field. However, denying emotion altogether doesn't necessarily lead to better research. Methods cannot function independently from the personalities wielding them, and it's time we questioned the tendency to underplay the scientific, personal, and political consequences of the emotional dimensions of fieldwork. This book explores the idea that emotion is not antithetical to thought or reason, but is instead an untapped source of insight that can complement more traditional methods of anthropological research. With a new, re-humanized methodological framework, this book shows how certain reactions and experiences consistently evoked in fieldwork, when treated with the intellectual rigor empirical work demands, can be translated into meaningful data. Emotions in the Field brings to mainstream anthropological awareness not only the viability and necessity of this neglected realm of research, but also its fresh and thoughtful guiding principles.
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