Portrait of a Moroccan

Author: Vincent Crapanzano

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 022619146X

Category: Social Science

Page: 204

View: 9374

Tuhami is an illiterate Moroccan tilemaker who believes himself married to a camel-footed she-demon. A master of magic and a superb story-teller, Tuhami lives in a dank, windowless hovel near the kiln where he works. Nightly he suffers visitations from the demons and saints who haunt his life, and he seeks, with crippling ambivalence, liberation from 'A'isha Qandisha, the she-demon. In a sensitive and bold experiment in interpretive ethnography, Crapanzano presents Tuhami's bizarre account of himself and his world. In so doing, Crapanzano draws on phenomenology, psychoanalysis, and symbolism to reflect upon the nature of reality and truth and to probe the limits of anthropology itself. Tuhami has become one of the most important and widely cited representatives of a new understanding of the whole discipline of anthropology.
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Portrait of a Moroccan

Author: Vincent Crapanzano

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226118710

Category: History

Page: 204

View: 1940

Tuhami is an illiterate Moroccan tilemaker who believes himself married to a camel-footed she-demon. A master of magic and a superb story-teller, Tuhami lives in a dank, windowless hovel near the kiln where he works. Nightly he suffers visitations from the demons and saints who haunt his life, and he seeks, with crippling ambivalence, liberation from 'A'isha Qandisha, the she-demon. In a sensitive and bold experiment in interpretive ethnography, Crapanzano presents Tuhami's bizarre account of himself and his world. In so doing, Crapanzano draws on phenomenology, psychoanalysis, and symbolism to reflect upon the nature of reality and truth and to probe the limits of anthropology itself. Tuhami has become one of the most important and widely cited representatives of a new understanding of the whole discipline of anthropology.
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An Essay in Literary-Philosophical Anthropology

Author: Vincent Crapanzano

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226118758

Category: Social Science

Page: 280

View: 1410

How do people make sense of their experiences? How do they understand possibility? How do they limit possibility? These questions are central to all the human sciences. Here, Vincent Crapanzano offers a powerfully creative new way to think about human experience: the notion of imaginative horizons. For Crapanzano, imaginative horizons are the blurry boundaries that separate the here and now from what lies beyond, in time and space. These horizons, he argues, deeply influence both how we experience our lives and how we interpret those experiences, and here sets himself the task of exploring the roles that creativity and imagination play in our experience of the world.
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Author: Vincent Crapanzano

Publisher: Other Press, LLC

ISBN: 1590515943

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 400

View: 9988

A distinguished anthropologist tells his life story as a wistful novelist would, watching himself as if he were someone else This memoir recaptures meaningful moments from the author’s life: as his childhood on the grounds of a psychiatric hospital, his psychiatrist father’s early death, his years at school in Switzerland and then at Harvard in the 1960s, his love affairs, his own teaching, and his far-flung travels. Taken together, these stories have the power of a nothing-taken-for-granted vision, fighting those conventions and ideologies that deaden the creative and inquiring mind.
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A Study in Moroccan Ethnopsychiatry

Author: Vincent Crapanzano

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 9780520022416

Category: Hạmadsha

Page: 258

View: 3064

The Hamadsha are members of a loosely and diversely organized religious brotherhood, or confraternity, which traces its spiritual heritage back to two Moroccan saints of the late seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries, Sidi 'Ali ben Hamdush and Sidi Ahmed Dghughi. Despite a certain notoriety due to their head-slashing and other practices of self-mutilation, the Hamadsha have received comparatively little attention in the literature, ethnographic or other, on Morocco and North Africa.
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Ecologies of Practice across Andean Worlds

Author: Marisol de la Cadena

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN: 0822375265

Category: Social Science

Page: 368

View: 461

Earth Beings is the fruit of Marisol de la Cadena's decade-long conversations with Mariano and Nazario Turpo, father and son, runakuna or Quechua people. Concerned with the mutual entanglements of indigenous and nonindigenous worlds, and the partial connections between them, de la Cadena presents how the Turpos' indigenous ways of knowing and being include and exceed modern and nonmodern practices. Her discussion of indigenous political strategies—a realm that need not abide by binary logics—reconfigures how to think about and question modern politics, while pushing her readers to think beyond "hybridity" and toward translation, communication that accepts incommensurability, and mutual difference as conditions for ethnography to work.
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The Wound That Never Heals

Author: Vincent Crapanzano

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 0226118789

Category: Social Science

Page: 248

View: 8692

In this haunting chronicle of betrayal and abandonment, ostracism and exile, racism and humiliation, Vincent Crapanzano examines the story of the Harkis, the quarter of a million Algerian auxiliary troops who fought for the French in Algeria’s war of independence. After tens of thousands of Harkis were massacred by other Algerians at the end of the war, the survivors fled to France where they were placed in camps, some for as long as sixteen years. Condemned as traitors by other Algerians and scorned by the French, the Harkis became a population apart, and their children still suffer from their parents’ wounds. Many have become activists, lobbying for recognition of their parents’ sacrifices, compensation, and an apology. More than just a retelling of the Harkis’ grim past and troubling present, The Harkis is a resonant reflection on how children bear responsibility for the choices their parents make, how personal identity is shaped by the impersonal forces of history, and how violence insinuates itself into every facet of human life.
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Two Decades of Dialogue on Disability, Biography, and Being Female in America

Author: Gelya Frank

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 9780520922358

Category: Social Science

Page: 299

View: 3770

In 1976 Gelya Frank began writing about the life of Diane DeVries, a woman born with all the physical and mental equipment she would need to live in our society--except arms and legs. Frank was 28 years old, DeVries 26. This remarkable book--by turns moving, funny, and revelatory--records the relationship that developed between the women over the next twenty years. An empathic listener and participant in DeVries's life, and a scholar of the feminist and disability rights movements, Frank argues that Diane DeVries is a perfect example of an American woman coming of age in the second half of the twentieth century. By addressing the dynamics of power in ethnographic representation, Frank--anthropology's leading expert on life history and life story methods--lays the critical groundwork for a new genre, "cultural biography." Challenged to examine the cultural sources of her initial image of DeVries as limited and flawed, Frank discovers that DeVries is gutsy, buoyant, sexy--and definitely not a victim. While she analyzes the portrayal of women with disabilities in popular culture--from limbless circus performers to suicidal heroines on the TV news--Frank's encounters with DeVries lead her to come to terms with her own "invisible disabilities" motivating the study. Drawing on anthropology, philosophy, psychoanalysis, narrative theory, law, and the history of medicine, Venus on Wheels is an intellectual tour de force.
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On the Epistemology of Interpretation

Author: Vincent Crapanzano

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 9780674389816

Category: Social Science

Page: 386

View: 6288

A distinguished anthropologist and a creative force behind postmodern writing in his field, Vincent Crapanzano here focuses his considerable critical powers upon his own culture. In essays that question how the human sciences, particularly anthropology and psychoanalysis, articulate their fields of study, Crapanzano addresses nothing less than the enormous problem of defining the self in both its individual and collective projections.
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An Essay on Personal Symbols and Religious Experience

Author: Gananath Obeyesekere

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 022618921X

Category: Social Science

Page: 232

View: 5486

The great pilgrimage center of southeastern Sri Lanka, Kataragama, has become in recent years the spiritual home of a new class of Hindu-Buddhist religious devotees. These ecstatic priests and priestesses invariably display long locks of matted hair, and they express their devotion to the gods through fire walking, tongue-piercing, hanging on hooks, and trance-induced prophesying. The increasing popularity of these ecstatics poses a challenge not only to orthodox Sinhala Buddhism (the official religion of Sri Lanka) but also, as Gananath Obeyesekere shows, to the traditional anthropological and psychoanalytic theories of symbolism. Focusing initially on one symbol, matted hair, Obeyesekere demonstrates that the conventional distinction between personal and cultural symbols is inadequate and naive. His detailed case studies of ecstatics show that there is always a reciprocity between the personal-psychological dimension of the symbol and its public, culturally sanctioned role. Medusa's Hair thus makes an important theoretical contribution both to the anthropology of individual experience and to the psychoanalytic understanding of culture. In its analyses of the symbolism of guilt, the adaptational and integrative significance of belief in spirits, and a host of related issues concerning possession states and religiosity, this book marks a provocative advance in psychological anthropology.
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Being a Person the Tamil Way

Author: E. Valentine Daniel

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 9780520061675

Category: Social Science

Page: 320

View: 4731

"Daniel is brilliant, and this work is the product of all his powers of imagination and expression. He is also a flawless scholar: bilingual, so that his translations are accurate; gifted, so that they are charming; well-read, so that his discussions are set in the full context of previous scholarship; and very, very funny, so that his depictions of the quandaries of his informants, as well as himself, are a joy to read."--Wendy O'Flaherty
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Life in a Zone of Social Abandonment

Author: João Biehl

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520951468

Category: Social Science

Page: 440

View: 6467

Zones of social abandonment are emerging everywhere in Brazil’s big cities—places like Vita, where the unwanted, the mentally ill, the sick, and the homeless are left to die. This haunting, unforgettable story centers on a young woman named Catarina, increasingly paralyzed and said to be mad, living out her time at Vita. Anthropologist João Biehl leads a detective-like journey to know Catarina; to unravel the cryptic, poetic words that are part of the "dictionary" she is compiling; and to trace the complex network of family, medicine, state, and economy in which her abandonment and pathology took form. An instant classic, Vita has been widely acclaimed for its bold fieldwork, theoretical innovation, and literary force. Reflecting on how Catarina’s life story continues, this updated edition offers the reader a powerful new afterword and gripping new photographs following Biehl and Eskerod’s return to Vita. Anthropology at its finest, Vita is essential reading for anyone who is grappling with how to understand the conditions of life, thought, and ethics in the contemporary world.
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Process and Temporality in Ethnographic Fieldwork

Author: Allaine Cerwonka,Liisa H. Malkki

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 0226100286

Category: Social Science

Page: 224

View: 4258

Scholars have long recognized that ethnographic method is bound up with the construction of theory in ways that are difficult to teach. The reason, Allaine Cerwonka and Liisa H. Malkki argue, is that ethnographic theorization is essentially improvisatory in nature, conducted in real time and in necessarily unpredictable social situations. In a unique account of, and critical reflection on, the process of theoretical improvisation in ethnographic research, they demonstrate how both objects of analysis, and our ways of knowing and explaining them, are created and discovered in the give and take of real life, in all its unpredictability and immediacy. Improvising Theory centers on the year-long correspondence between Cerwonka, then a graduate student in political science conducting research in Australia, and her anthropologist mentor, Malkki. Through regular e-mail exchanges, Malkki attempted to teach Cerwonka, then new to the discipline, the basic tools and subtle intuition needed for anthropological fieldwork. The result is a strikingly original dissection of the processual ethics and politics of method in ethnography.
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Thirtieth Anniversary Edition, with a New Preface by the Author

Author: Paul Rabinow

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520933893

Category: Social Science

Page: 208

View: 1871

In this landmark study, now celebrating thirty years in print, Paul Rabinow takes as his focus the fieldwork that anthropologists do. How valid is the process? To what extent do the cultural data become artifacts of the interaction between anthropologist and informants? Having first published a more standard ethnographic study about Morocco, Rabinow here describes a series of encounters with his informants in that study, from a French innkeeper clinging to the vestiges of a colonial past, to the rural descendants of a seventeenth-century saint. In a new preface Rabinow considers the thirty-year life of this remarkable book and his own distinguished career.
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The Selected Papers of John Whiting

Author: John Whiting,Eleanor Hollenberg Chasdi,Roy D'Andrade

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521028066

Category: Family & Relationships

Page: 376

View: 8531

John Whiting is a leading figure in psychological anthropology and a pioneer in the development of systematic cross-cultural research. His work is interdisciplinary, drawing mainly on the fields of anthropology, psychoanalysis, and learning and behavior theory. This book includes some of his most influential articles on culture and human development, and a comprehensive autobiographical essay. Roy D'Andrade's introduction assesses the unique contributions of Whiting and locates his work within the contemporary currents of psychological anthropology.
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Author: John M. Ingham

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521559188

Category: Psychology

Page: 308

View: 5112

Reviews developments in pyschological anthropology and examines psychoanalytic, dialogical and social perspectives on personality and culture.
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A Puerto Rican Life History

Author: Sidney Wilfred Mintz

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN: 9780393007312

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 288

View: 9019

This is the absorbing story of Don Taso, a Puerto Rican sugar cane worker, and of his family and the village in which he lives. Told largely in his own words, it is a vivid account of the drastic changes taking place in Puerto Rico, as he sees them.Worker In The Cane is both a profound social document and a moving spiritual testimony. Don Taso portrays his harsh childhood, his courtship and early marriage, his grim struggle to provide for his family. He tells of his radical political beliefs and union activity during the Depression and describes his hardships when he was blacklisted because of his outspoken convictions. Embittered by his continuing poverty and by a serious illness, he undergoes a dramatic cure and becomes converted to a Protestant revivalist sect. In the concluding chapters the author interprets Don Taso's experience in the light of the rapidly changing patterns of life in rural Puerto Rico.
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From Religious Dispute to Revolution

Author: Michael M. J. Fischer

Publisher: Univ of Wisconsin Press

ISBN: 9780299184735

Category: History

Page: 360

View: 3328

Unlike much of the instant analysis that appeared at the time of the Iranian revolution, Iran: From Religious Dispute to Revolution is based upon extensive fieldwork carried out in Iran. Michael M. J. Fischer draws upon his rich experience with the mullahs and their students in the holy city of Qum, composing a picture of Iranian society from the inside—the lives of ordinary people, the way that each class interprets Islam, and the role of religion and religious education in the culture. Fischer’s book, with its new introduction updating arguments for the post-Revolutionary period, brings a dynamic view of a society undergoing metamorphosis, which remains fundamental to understanding Iranian society in the early twenty-first century.
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