The Roberts Court and the Constitution

Author: Laurence Tribe,Joshua Matz

Publisher: Henry Holt and Company

ISBN: 0805099131

Category: Political Science

Page: 416

View: 854

With the Supreme Court more influential than ever, this eye-opening book tells the story of how the Roberts Court is shaking the foundation of our nation's laws From Citizens United to its momentous rulings regarding Obamacare and gay marriage, the Supreme Court under Chief Justice John Roberts has profoundly affected American life. Yet the court remains a mysterious institution, and the motivations of the nine men and women who serve for life are often obscure. Now, in Uncertain Justice, Laurence Tribe and Joshua Matz show the surprising extent to which the Roberts Court is revising the meaning of our Constitution. This essential book arrives at a make-or-break moment for the nation and the court. Political gridlock, cultural change, and technological progress mean that the court's decisions on key topics—including free speech, privacy, voting rights, and presidential power—could be uniquely durable. Acutely aware of their opportunity, the justices are rewriting critical aspects of constitutional law and redrawing the ground rules of American government. Tribe—one of the country's leading constitutional lawyers—and Matz dig deeply into the court's recent rulings, stepping beyond tired debates over judicial "activism" to draw out hidden meanings and silent battles. The undercurrents they reveal suggest a strikingly different vision for the future of our country, one that is sure to be hotly debated. Filled with original insights and compelling human stories, Uncertain Justice illuminates the most colorful story of all—how the Supreme Court and the Constitution frame the way we live.
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The Roberts Court and the Constitution

Author: Laurence Tribe,Joshua Matz

Publisher: Macmillan

ISBN: 0805099093

Category: Law

Page: 416

View: 5926

A revelatory assessment of how the Supreme Court under Chief Justice John Roberts is significantly influencing the nation's laws and reinterpreting the Constitution includes in-depth analysis of recent rulings to explore their less-understood debates and relevance. 50,000 first printing.
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The Roberts Court and the Constitution

Author: Laurence Tribe,Joshua Matz

Publisher: Picador

ISBN: 9781250069351

Category: Political Science

Page: 416

View: 686

"Irresistible...A brilliantly layered account of the Roberts Court filled with memorable stories...This book is a joy to read from start to finish."-Doris Kearns Goodwin, author of Team of Rivals and The Bully Pulpit From Citizens United to its momentous rulings regarding Obamacare and gay marriage, the Supreme Court under Chief Justice John Roberts has profoundly affected American life. Yet the court remains a mysterious institution, and the motivations of the nine men and women who serve for life are often obscure. Now, in Uncertain Justice, Laurence Tribe and Joshua Matz show the surprising extent to which the Roberts Court is revising the meaning of our Constitution. This essential book arrives at a make-or-break moment for the nation and the court, and the court's decisions on key topics-including free speech, privacy, voting rights, and presidential power-could be uniquely durable. Tribe, one of the country's leading constitutional lawyers, and Matz dig deeply into the court's rulings to deliver original insights and compelling human stories. In the end, Uncertain Justice illuminates the most colorful story of all-how the Supreme Court and the Constitution frame the way we live.
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Canadian Women and Capital Punishment, 1754-1953

Author: F. Murray Greenwood,Beverley Boissery

Publisher: Dundurn

ISBN: 1554880351

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 280

View: 5658

In 1754 Eleanor Powers was hung for a murder committed during a botched robbery. She was the first woman condemned to die in Canada, but would not be the last. In Uncertain Justice, Beverley Boissery and Murray Greenwood portray a cast of women characters almost as often wronged by the law as they have wronged society. Starting with the Powers trial and continuing to the not-too-distant past, the authors expose the patriarchal values that lie at the core of criminal law, and the class and gender biases that permeate its procedures and applications. The writing style is similar to that of a popular mystery: "Harriet Henry lay dead. Horribly and indubitably. Her body sprawled against the bed, the head twisted at a grotesque angle. Foam engulfed the grinning mouth." Scholarly analysis combines with the narrative to make Uncertain Justice a fascinating and engaging read. There is a wealth of information about the emerging and evolving legal system and profession, the state of forensic science, the roles of juries, and the political turmoil and growing resistance to a purely class-based aristocratic form of government.
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politics and America's courts : the reports of the task forces of Citizens for Independent Courts

Author: Citizens for Independent Courts,Century Foundation

Publisher: Twentieth Century Fund

ISBN: 9780870784484

Category: Law

Page: 242

View: 2530

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Author: Marnie L. Pehrson

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780982587805

Category: Fiction

Page: 292

View: 6499

On a sunny afternoon in March 1922, Deputy Sheriff Morton was gunned down in cold blood, and his grandson, Sherman, wants revenge. For Sherman, only an eye-for-an-eye retribution will serve the demands of justice, but elements of the community feel differently. Soon the national media ignites a frenzy amongst boys' organizations across the country, coaxing the governor to consider a stay of execution for the two youths responsible for the crime. As Sherman's anger and frustration increase, his life begins to unravel -- affecting his job and his relationship with the girl he loves. This riveting true story about the last legal hanging in Georgia captured the attention of a nation, but more importantly, it racked the soul of a boy who dearly loved his grandfather. How does one deal with the long-lasting effects of murder? Does a punishment ever fit the crime? Is it possible, or even necessary to forgive a murderer? Find out within the pages of An Uncertain Justice, a look into the scope of justice and mercy that will make you question what you believe.
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Author: Susanna Lindroos-Hovinheimo

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1136466002

Category: Philosophy

Page: 192

View: 8595

Justice and the Ethics of Legal Interpretation addresses how it is that legal texts -laws, statutes and regulations – can, and do have meaning. Conventionally, legal decisions are justified with reference to language. But since language is always open to interpretation, and so cannot fully justify any legal decision, there is a responsibility that is inherent in legal interpretation itself. In this book, Susanna Lindroos-Hovinheimo uncovers and analyses this responsibility – which, she argues, is not limited by the text that is being interpreted (and through its mediation, by the legal system). It is not simply a responsibility to read well; it implies a responsibility for the effects of the interpretation in a particular situation and with regard to those whose case is being decided. Ultimately, it is a responsibility to do justice. It is these two aspects of responsibility that are conceptualised here as the two key dimensions of the ethics of legal interpretation: the textual and the situational. Drawing on the work of Wittgenstein, Gadamer, Derrida and Levinas, Justice and the Ethics of Legal Interpretation offers a fresh approach to long-standing questions about language and meaning in law. It will be of enormous value to those with interests in jurisprudence and legal theory.
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The Clash of Absolutes

Author: Laurence H. Tribe

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781439509029

Category: Social Science

Page: N.A

View: 6669

Explores the path to compromise in the controversial issue of abortion, taking into account the crucial issues of right to privacy, the relations between the sexes, and individual freedom
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The Power of Impeachment

Author: Laurence Tribe,Joshua Matz

Publisher: Basic Books

ISBN: 1541644875

Category: Law

Page: 304

View: 3009

The history and future of our democracy's ultimate sanction, presidential impeachment, and a guide to how it should be used now To End a Presidency addresses one of today's most urgent questions: when and whether to impeach a president. Laurence Tribe and Joshua Matz provide an authoritative guide to impeachment's past and a bold argument about its proper role today. In an era of expansive presidential power and intense partisanship, we must rethink impeachment for the twenty-first century. Of impeachments, one Constitutional Convention delegate declared, "A good magistrate will not fear them. A bad one will be kept in fear of them." To End a Presidency is an essential book for all Americans seeking to understand how this crucial but fearsome power should be exercised.
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The Politics and Erotics of Mobility Justice

Author: Liz Montegary,Melissa Autumn White

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 1137464216

Category: Social Science

Page: 151

View: 8315

This book combines mobilities research with feminist and queer studies offering new perspectives on mobility justice. It foregrounds academic, activist, and artistic work revealing state-sponsored strategies for managing the mobility of people as mechanisms for aligning erotic and political desires with capitalist and nationalist interests.
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An Adam Dalgliesh Novel

Author: P. D. James

Publisher: Ballantine Books

ISBN: 0307813533

Category: Fiction

Page: 464

View: 1774

Read P.D. James in Large Print! It begins, dramatically enough, with a trial for murder. The distinguished criminal lawyer Venetia Aldridge is defending Garry Ashe on charges of having brutally killed his aunt. For Aldridge the trial is mainly a test of her courtroom skills, one more opportunity to succeed--and she does. But now murder is in the air. The next victim will be Aldridge herself, stabbed to death at her desk in her Chambers in the Middle Temple, a bloodstained wig on her head. Enter Commander Adam Dalgliesh and his team, whose struggle to investigate and understand the shocking events cannot halt the spiral into more horrors, more murders... A Certain Justice is P.D. James at her strongest. In her first foray into the strange closed world of the Law Courts and the London legal community, she has created a fascinating tale of interwoven passion and terror. As each character leaps into unforgettable life, as each scene draws us forward into new complexities of plot, she proves yet again that no other writer can match her skill in combining the excitement of the classic detective story with the richness of a fine novel. In its subtle portrayal of morality and human behavior, A Certain Justice will stand alongside Devices and Desires and A Taste for Death as one of P.D. James's most important, accomplished and entertaining works.
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Deportation, Punishment and Everyday Life

Author: Ines Hasselberg

Publisher: Berghahn Books

ISBN: 1785330233

Category: Social Science

Page: 186

View: 2317

Focusing on the lived experience of immigration policy and processes, this volume provides fascinating insights into the deportation process as it is felt and understood by those subjected to it. The author presents a rich and innovative ethnography of deportation and deportability experienced by migrants convicted of criminal offenses in England and Wales. The unique perspectives developed here – on due process in immigration appeals, migrant surveillance and control, social relations and sense of self, and compliance and resistance – are important for broader understandings of border control policy and human rights.
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The Struggle for the Constitution

Author: Marcia Coyle

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 145162753X

Category: Political Science

Page: 416

View: 4597

The Roberts Court, seven years old, sits at the center of a constitutional maelstrom. Through four landmark decisions, Marcia Coyle, one of the most prestigious experts on the Supreme Court, reveals the fault lines in the conservative-dominated Court led by Chief Justice John Roberts Jr. Seven minutes after President Obama put his signature to a landmark national health care insurance program, a lawyer in the office of Florida GOP attorney general Bill McCollum hit a computer key, sparking a legal challenge to the new law that would eventually reach the nation’s highest court. Health care is only the most visible and recent front in a battle over the meaning and scope of the U.S. Constitution. The battleground is the United States Supreme Court, and one of the most skilled, insightful, and trenchant of its observers takes us close up to watch it in action. Marcia Coyle’s brilliant inside account of the High Court captures four landmark decisions—concerning health care, money in elections, guns at home, and race in schools. Coyle examines how those cases began—the personalities and conflicts that catapulted them onto the national scene—and how they ultimately exposed the great divides among the justices, such as the originalists versus the pragmatists on guns and the Second Amendment, and corporate speech versus human speech in the controversial Citizens United campaign case. Most dramatically, her analysis shows how dedicated conservative lawyers and groups are strategizing to find cases and crafting them to bring up the judicial road to the Supreme Court with an eye on a receptive conservative majority. The Roberts Court offers a ringside seat at the struggle to lay down the law of the land.
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The Search for Truth and Justice After Serial

Author: Rabia Chaudry

Publisher: St. Martin's Press

ISBN: 1250087112

Category: True Crime

Page: 320

View: 3425

Now a New York Times bestseller The 2017 American Book Award Winner from the Before Columbus Foundation A Washington Post notable nonfiction book for 2016 A Goodreads Best of 2016 Nonfiction Finalist A Kobo Best Book of 2016 Includes an update from Rabia on Adnan's vacated murder conviction in summer 2016 Serial only told part of the story... In early 2000, Adnan Syed was convicted and sentenced to life plus thirty years for the murder of his ex-girlfriend Hae Min Lee, a high school senior in Baltimore, Maryland. Syed has maintained his innocence, and Rabia Chaudry, a family friend, has always believed him. By 2013, after almost all appeals had been exhausted, Rabia contacted Sarah Koenig, a producer at This American Life, in hopes of finding a journalist who could shed light on Adnan’s story. In 2014, Koenig's investigation turned into Serial, a Peabody Award-winning podcast with more than 500 million international listeners But Serial did not tell the whole story. In this compelling narrative, Rabia Chaudry presents new key evidence that she maintains dismantles the State's case: a potential new suspect, forensics indicating Hae was killed and kept somewhere for almost half a day, and documentation withheld by the State that destroys the cell phone evidence -- among many other points -- and she shows how fans of Serial joined a crowd-sourced investigation into a case riddled with errors and strange twists. Adnan's Story also shares Adnan’s life in prison, and weaves in his personal reflections, including never-before-seen letters. Chaudry, who is committed to exonerating Adnan, makes it clear that justice is yet to be achieved in this much examined case.
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Author: Amartya Sen

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 0674060474

Category: Philosophy

Page: 467

View: 1821

Presents an analysis of what justice is, the transcendental theory of justice and its drawbacks, and a persuasive argument for a comparative perspective on justice that can guide us in the choice between alternatives.
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Uncertain Landscapes

Author: Ipshita Basu,Joe Devine,Geof Wood

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1351781685

Category: Social Science

Page: 198

View: 7358

Since its Independence in 1971, Bangladesh has made remarkable progress in terms of reducing poverty levels, achieving high levels of economic growth over a sustained period of time, and meeting its Millennium Development Goals (MDG) targets set by the United Nations. With some justification, Bangladesh is considered an international development success story, and the country appears to be well on track to meet its policy target of becoming a middle-income country by 2021, the same year the country will celebrate 50 years of Independence. This book explores the central issue of Bangladeshi politics: the weakness of governance. The coexistence of a poor governance track record and a relatively strong socioeconomic performance makes Bangladesh an intriguing case which throws up exciting and relevant conceptual and policy challenges. Structured in four sections - Political Settlement, Elites and Deep Structures; Democracy, Citizenship and Values; Civil Society, Local Context and Political Change; Informality and Accountability – the book identifies and engages with these challenges. Chapters by experts in the field share a number of conceptual and epistemological principles and offer a combination of theoretical and empirical insights, and cover a good range of contemporary issues and debate. Employing a structurally determinist perspective, this book explains politics and society in Bangladesh from a novel perspective. Academics in the field of governance and politics in developing countries, with a focus on South Asia and Bangladesh will welcome its publication.
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Author: John T. Lescroart

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 9780451217769

Category: Fiction

Page: 466

View: 925

A novel that examines the nature of justice--and injustice--follows an ordinary man who, through no fault of his own, is hounded, hunted, and almost destroyed for a crime he did not commit.
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Racial Health Care Disparities and Sickle Cell Disease

Author: Carolyn Rouse

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520259122

Category: Medical

Page: 314

View: 1800

“Within the pages of Uncertain Suffering it becomes all too clear that race, class, and age converge to define a powerful triple blow that guarantees both subtle and outrageously obvious health disparities. Rouse moves gracefully from the subjective pain of adolescent patients in crisis, to the compassionate yet distanced professionalism of health care specialists, to the level of national policy, revealing a clinical world fraught with contradictions over how best to treat black, and, all too often, underclass children in pain. Uncertain Suffering will make a big splash within anthropology.”—Lesley Sharp, Barnard College “Uncertain Suffering will have a unique place in medical anthropology, public health scholarship, and the social sciences of health. It involves a layered and deeply philosophical approach to the limits of the role/ responsibility of modern American medicine to address the suffering of African American patients.”—Rayna Rapp, New York University
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Comparative Perspectives on Unmet Legal Need

Author: Asher Flynn,Jacqueline Hodgson

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 1509900853

Category: Law

Page: 304

View: 5491

This book considers how access to justice is affected by restrictions to legal aid budgets and increasingly prescriptive service guidelines. As common law jurisdictions, England and Wales and Australia, share similar ideals, policies and practices, but they differ in aspects of their legal and political culture, in the nature of the communities they serve and in their approaches to providing access to justice. These jurisdictions thus provide us with different perspectives on what constitutes justice and how we might seek to overcome the burgeoning crisis in unmet legal need. The book fills an important gap in existing scholarship as the first to bring together new empirical and theoretical knowledge examining different responses to legal aid crises both in the domestic and comparative contexts, across criminal, civil and family law. It achieves this by examining the broader social, political, legal, health and welfare impacts of legal aid cuts and prescriptive service guidelines. Across both jurisdictions, this work suggests that it is the most vulnerable groups who lose out in the way the law now operates in the twenty-first century. This book is essential reading for academics, students, practitioners and policymakers interested in criminal and civil justice, access to justice, the provision of legal assistance and legal aid.
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How American Juvenile Justice Lost Its Way

Author: Cara H. Drinan

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0190605553

Category: Law

Page: 232

View: 1934

In 2003, when Terrence Graham was sixteen, he and three other teens attempted to rob a barbeque restaurant in Jacksonville, Florida. Though they left with no money, and no one was seriously injured, Terrence was sentenced to die in prison for his involvement in that crime. As shocking as Terrence's sentence sounds, it is merely a symptom of contemporary American juvenile justice practices. In the United States, adolescents are routinely transferred out of juvenile court and into adult criminal court without any judicial oversight. Once in adult court, children can be sentenced without regard for their youth. Juveniles are housed in adult correctional facilities, they may be held in solitary confinement, and they experience the highest rates of sexual and physical assault among inmates. Until 2005, children convicted in America's courts were subject to the death penalty; today, they still may be sentenced to die in prison-no matter what efforts they make to rehabilitate themselves. America has waged a war on kids. In The War on Kids, Cara Drinan reveals how the United States went from being a pioneer to an international pariah in its juvenile sentencing practices. Academics and journalists have long recognized the failings of juvenile justice practices in this country and have called for change. Despite the uncertain political climate, there is hope that recent Supreme Court decisions may finally make those calls a reality. The War on Kids seizes upon this moment of judicial and political recognition that children are different in the eyes of the law. Drinan chronicles the shortcomings of juvenile justice by drawing upon social science, legal decisions, and first-hand correspondence with Terrence and others like him-individuals whose adolescent errors have cost them their lives. At the same time, The War on Kids maps out concrete steps that states can take to correct the course of American juvenile justice.
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