Implicit Attitudes and Political Thinking

Author: Efrén O. Pérez

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107133734

Category: Philosophy

Page: 228

View: 4909

This book offers a comprehensive look at the conceptualization, measurement, and political impacts of implicit attitudes.
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The Unspoken Politics of the English Language

Author: Agwu Ukiwe Okali

Publisher: BookBaby

ISBN: 1682229491

Category: Political Science

Page: 236

View: 5919

The importance and influence of the English language in modern life cannot be gainsaid. Not only is there a large and growing number of people who communicate in it - about one quarter of the world’s population by some estimates - but it is by far the world’s favorite second language, that is, the language more people are likely to speak than any other in addition to their own native tongues. Indeed, one of the enduring realities of modern life is the dominance of English as the language of communication across cultures. As goes Anglophone culture, so goes the world. With the acquisition of English, one also acquires not just the words and expressions, but, most critically, the system of thought and mindset associated with the language. Therein lies the crux of the matter: the unfortunate implications of this global dominance of the English language for the black race, and which implications form the subject of this book. Everyone knows that in English bad things are “black” and “black” things are not good (e.g. black spot, black day and blackmail). By the same token, good things are “white” and “white” things are not bad (white knight, white magic, white lie). The unfortunate, and dangerous, thing is that this categorization is not only widespread throughout the language, but is systemic and systematically applied. This “blackness of bad/badness of black” concept, together with its accompanying mindset, and the consequences which flow from it for both black and white people, and for humanity at large, is the focus of this book. Of Black Servitude Without Slavery: The Unspoken Politics of The English Language avers that this “blackness of bad/badness of black” mindset, unavoidably imported into the realm of race relations, creates a situation in which black people effectively are held in perpetual psychological servitude, and the white person, independent of himself or herself, is imbued from childhood with a mindset of negativity towards “black” things, thus, wittingly or otherwise, negating the notion of equality of the races, which mindset he or she actually has to work hard to overcome. In substantiation of this averment, the author undertakes an exposition of the role and impact of the “blackness of bad” mindset in the daily lives of both black and white people, and ultimately of society-at-large. Among the contexts in which the subject is analyzed are those of race relations, the black image and black self-esteem, Western aesthetics, including the idea of beauty, constitutional law,and the administration and enforcement of criminal justice. The author, after thus exploring the broad ramifications for society of this essentially systemic defamation of the black race embodied in the "blackness of bad/badness of black, etc." terminology, with accompanying mindset, goes on to proffer a unique and effective solution, together with an implementing campaign, to remedy this situation as an urgent imperative of our time. Of Black Servitude Without Slavery: The Unspoken Politics of The English Language is a book of wide-ranging coverage that would engage anyone involved or interested in issues of philosophy, politics, linguistics, human rights, race relations, law, social justice and equity, and, for that matter, social behavior.
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Causes and Consequences

Author: Stuart N. Soroka

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107063299

Category: Philosophy

Page: 184

View: 4301

This book explores the political implications of the human tendency to prioritize negative information over positive information. Drawing on literatures in political science, psychology, economics, communications, biology, and physiology, this book argues that "negativity biases" should be evident across a wide range of political behaviors. These biases are then demonstrated through a diverse and cross-disciplinary set of analyses, for instance: in citizens' ratings of presidents and prime ministers; in aggregate-level reactions to economic news, across 17 countries; in the relationship between covers and newsmagazine sales; and in individuals' physiological reactions to network news content. The pervasiveness of negativity biases extends, this book suggests, to the functioning of political institutions - institutions that have been designed to prioritize negative information in the same way as the human brain.
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Sexual Orientation and Women's Human Rights

Author: Rachel Rosenbloom

Publisher: Weidenfeld & Nicolson

ISBN: N.A

Category: Political Science

Page: 257

View: 8975

"This courageous and groundbreaking book documents human rights violations against women in 30 countries around the world and discusses the strategies that lesbian activists and other human rights advocates have employed to challenge such oppression." "Placing lesbian rights within the framework of the broader struggle for women's human rights, this book demonstrates how women's rights and lesbian rights are linked in substantive ways. Both issues highlight how human rights distinctions between the private and public, as well as reluctance to address female sexuality, have perpetuated violations of women and kept them invisible. Furthermore, the defence of lesbian rights is integral to the defence of women's right to determine their own sexuality, to work at the jobs they prefer and to live as they choose with women, men, children or alone. Homophobia, it is argued, is used as a tool to keep women in line and force them to accept their society's assigned gender roles and limitations."--BOOK JACKET.Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved
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Author: Neil deGrasse Tyson,Avis Lang

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN: 039328543X

Category: Science

Page: 448

View: 5960

An exploration of the age-old complicity between skywatchers and warfighters, from the best-selling author of Astrophysics for People in a Hurry. In this fascinating foray into the centuries-old relationship between science and military power, acclaimed astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson and writer-researcher Avis Lang examine how the methods and tools of astrophysics have been enlisted in the service of war. "The overlap is strong, and the knowledge flows in both directions," say the authors, because astrophysicists and military planners care about many of the same things: multi-spectral detection, ranging, tracking, imaging, high ground, nuclear fusion, and access to space. Tyson and Lang call it a "curiously complicit" alliance. "The universe is both the ultimate frontier and the highest of high grounds," they write. "Shared by both space scientists and space warriors, it’s a laboratory for one and a battlefield for the other. The explorer wants to understand it; the soldier wants to dominate it. But without the right technology—which is more or less the same technology for both parties—nobody can get to it, operate in it, scrutinize it, dominate it, or use it to their advantage and someone else’s disadvantage." Spanning early celestial navigation to satellite-enabled warfare, Accessory to War is a richly researched and provocative examination of the intersection of science, technology, industry, and power that will introduce Tyson’s millions of fans to yet another dimension of how the universe has shaped our lives and our world.
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Author: Andrew James Hartley

Publisher: Macmillan International Higher Education

ISBN: 1137190167

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 176

View: 5527

What makes a Shakespeare production political? Can Shakespeare's plays ever be truly radical? Revealing the unspoken politics of Shakespeare's plays on stage, Andrew Hartley examines their nature, agenda, limits and potential. In considering key theoretical issues, analysing a wide range of productions, and engaging in a collaborative debate with Professor Ayanna Thompson, Hartley highlights a more consciously political approach to making theatre out of Shakespeare's scripts – and to experiencing it as an audience. Dynamic and provocative, this book is a crucial text for students and theatre practitioners alike.
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Building a Directly Representative Democracy

Author: Michael A. Neblo,Kevin M. Esterling,David M. J. Lazer

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1108577482

Category: Political Science

Page: N.A

View: 2184

Many citizens in the US and abroad fear that democratic institutions have become weak, and continue to weaken. Politics with the People develops the principles and practice of 'directly representative democracy' - a new way of connecting citizens and elected officials to improve representative government. Sitting members of Congress agreed to meet with groups of their constituents via online, deliberative town hall meetings to discuss some of the most important and controversial issues of the day. The results from these experiments reveal a model of how our democracy could work, where politicians consult with and inform citizens in substantive discussions, and where otherwise marginalized citizens participate and are empowered. Moving beyond our broken system of interest group politics and partisan bloodsport, directly representative reforms will help restore citizens' faith in the institutions of democratic self-government, precisely at a time when those institutions themselves feel dysfunctional and endangered.
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Journalism, Public Opinion and Policymaking in Europe

Author: Giovanna Dell’Orto,Irmgard Wetzstein

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1351049615

Category: Political Science

Page: 228

View: 1244

The unprecedented arrival of more than a million refugees, asylum seekers, and migrants – plus the political, public, and policy reactions to it – is redefining Europe. The repercussions will last for generations on such central issues as security, national identity, human rights, and the very structure of liberal democracies. What is the role of the news media in telling the story of the 2010s refugee crisis at a time of deepening crisis for journalism, as “fake news” ran rampant amid an increasingly distrustful public? This volume offers students, scholars, and the general reader original research and candid frontline insights to understand the intersecting influences of journalistic practices, news discourses, public opinion, and policymaking on one of the most polarizing issues of our time. Focusing on current events in Greece, Austria, and Germany – critical entry and destination countries – it introduces a groundbreaking dialogue between elite national and international media, academic institutions, and civil society organizations, revealing the complex impacts of the news media on the thorny sociopolitical dilemmas raised by the integration of hundreds of thousands of asylum seekers in EU countries.
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The Unspoken Truth of Our Racial Divide

Author: Carol Anderson

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing USA

ISBN: 1632864142

Category: History

Page: 256

View: 8918

National Book Critics Circle Award Winner New York Times Bestseller A New York Times Notable Book of the Year A Washington Post Notable Nonfiction Book of the Year A Boston Globe Best Book of 2016 A Chicago Review of Books Best Nonfiction Book of 2016 From the Civil War to our combustible present, acclaimed historian Carol Anderson reframes our continuing conversation about race, chronicling the powerful forces opposed to black progress in America. As Ferguson, Missouri, erupted in August 2014, and media commentators across the ideological spectrum referred to the angry response of African Americans as "black rage,†? historian Carol Anderson wrote a remarkable op-ed in The Washington Post suggesting that this was, instead, "white rage at work. With so much attention on the flames," she argued, "everyone had ignored the kindling." Since 1865 and the passage of the Thirteenth Amendment, every time African Americans have made advances towards full participation in our democracy, white reaction has fueled a deliberate and relentless rollback of their gains. The end of the Civil War and Reconstruction was greeted with the Black Codes and Jim Crow; the Supreme Court's landmark 1954 Brown v. Board of Education decision was met with the shutting down of public schools throughout the South while taxpayer dollars financed segregated white private schools; the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and Voting Rights Act of 1965 triggered a coded but powerful response, the so-called Southern Strategy and the War on Drugs that disenfranchised millions of African Americans while propelling presidents Nixon and Reagan into the White House, and then the election of America's first black President, led to the expression of white rage that has been as relentless as it has been brutal. Carefully linking these and other historical flashpoints when social progress for African Americans was countered by deliberate and cleverly crafted opposition, Anderson pulls back the veil that has long covered actions made in the name of protecting democracy, fiscal responsibility, or protection against fraud, rendering visible the long lineage of white rage. Compelling and dramatic in the unimpeachable history it relates, White Rage will add an important new dimension to the national conversation about race in America.
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How Americans Produce Apathy in Everyday Life

Author: Nina Eliasoph

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521587594

Category: Political Science

Page: 330

View: 3242

Nina Eliasoph's vivid portrait of American civic life reveals an intriguing culture of political avoidance. Despite the importance for democracy of open-ended political conversation among ordinary citizens, many Americans try hard to avoid appearing to care about politics. To discover how, where and why Americans create this culture of avoidance, the author accompanied suburban volunteers, activists, and recreation club members for over two years, listening to them talk - and avoid talking - about the wider world, together and in encounters with government, media, and corporate authorities. She shows how citizens create and express ideas in everyday life, contrasting their privately expressed convictions with their lack of public political engagement. Her book challenges received ideas about culture, power and democracy, while exposing the hard work of producing apathy.
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How Americans Produce Apathy in Everyday Life

Author: Nina Eliasoph

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521587594

Category: Political Science

Page: 330

View: 3223

Nina Eliasoph's vivid portrait of American civic life reveals an intriguing culture of political avoidance. Despite the importance for democracy of open-ended political conversation among ordinary citizens, many Americans try hard to avoid appearing to care about politics. To discover how, where and why Americans create this culture of avoidance, the author accompanied suburban volunteers, activists, and recreation club members for over two years, listening to them talk - and avoid talking - about the wider world, together and in encounters with government, media, and corporate authorities. She shows how citizens create and express ideas in everyday life, contrasting their privately expressed convictions with their lack of public political engagement. Her book challenges received ideas about culture, power and democracy, while exposing the hard work of producing apathy.
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Author: Jóhanna Kristín Birnir

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1139462601

Category: Political Science

Page: N.A

View: 4677

This book asks what distinguishes peaceful plural democracies from violent ones and what distinguishes violent ethnic groups from peaceful ones within the same democracy. Contrary to conventional wisdom, it suggests that ethnic groups and their political demands are not inherently intransigent and that violence is not a necessary corollary of ethnic politics. The book posits that ethnic identity serves as a stable but flexible information shortcut for political choices, influencing party formation and development in new and maturing democracies. It furthermore argues that political intransigence and violence expressed by some ethnic groups stem from circumstances exogenous to ethnic affiliations. In particular, absolute restrictions on ethnic access to the executive produce conditions under which ethnic group incentive to participate in peaceful electoral politics is eliminated. A number of case studies and statistical analysis of all electoral democracies since 1945 are used to test and support the formal argument.
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How Perceptions of Mass Collectives Affect Political Attitudes

Author: Diana C. Mutz

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521637268

Category: Political Science

Page: 334

View: 8086

People's perceptions of the attitudes and experiences of mass collectives are an increasingly important force in contemporary political life. In Impersonal Influence, Mutz goes beyond simply providing examples of how impersonal influence matters in the political process to provide a micro-level understanding of why information about distant and impersonal others often influence people's political attitudes and behaviors. Impersonal Influence is worthy of attention both from the standpoint of its impact on contemporary politics, and because of its potential to expand the boundaries of our understanding of social influence processes, and media's relation to them. The book's conclusions do not exonerate media from the effects of inaccurate portrayals of collective experience or opinion, but they suggest that the ways in which people are influenced by these perceptions are in themselves, not so much deleterious to democracy as absolutely necessary to promoting accountability in a large scale society.
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Haunted by History

Author: C. McGrattan

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 1137291796

Category: Political Science

Page: 211

View: 1611

The question of how to move beyond contentious pasts exercises societies across the globe. Focusing on Northern Ireland, this book examines how historical injustices continue to haunt contemporary lives, and how institutional and juridical approaches to 'dealing' with the past often give way to a silencing consensus or re-marginalising victims.
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Author: Ruth Hubbard

Publisher: Rutgers University Press

ISBN: 9780813514901

Category: History

Page: 229

View: 803

Argues that male scientists have interpreted female biology in terms of stereotyped social roles, and discusses eugenics, human evolution, and reproductive technology
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Author: Luis F. Jiménez

Publisher: University Press of Florida

ISBN: 9781683400370

Category: Political Science

Page: 216

View: 3811

This book details how migrants from Mexico, Colombia and Ecuador are shaping the politics of their country of origin, through increased participation and more competitive elections.
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A Rhetoric of Silence

Author: Cheryl Glenn

Publisher: SIU Press

ISBN: 9780809325849

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 220

View: 4970

In our talkative Western culture, speech is synonymous with authority and influence while silence is frequently misheard as passive agreement when it often signifies much more. In her groundbreaking exploration of silence as a significant rhetorical art, Cheryl Glenn articulates the ways in which tactical silence can be as expressive and strategic an instrument of human communication as speech itself. Drawing from linguistics, phenomenology, feminist studies, anthropology, ethnic studies, and literary analysis, Unspoken: A Rhetoric of Silence theorizes both a cartography and grammar of silence. By mapping the range of spaces silence inhabits, Glenn offers a new interpretation of its complex variations and uses. Glenn contextualizes the rhetoric of silence by focusing on selected contemporary examples. Listening to silence and voice as gendered positions, she analyzes the highly politicized silences and words of a procession of figures she refers to as ?all the President's women,” including Anita Hill, Lani Guiner, Gennifer Flowers, and Chelsea Clinton. She also turns an investigative ear to the cultural taciturnity attributed to various Native American groups?Navajo, Apache, Hopi, and Pueblo?and its true meaning. Through these examples, Glenn reinforces the rhetorical contributions of the unspoken, codifying silence as a rhetorical device with the potential to deploy, defer, and defeat power. Unspoken concludes by suggesting opportunities for further research into silence and silencing, including music, religion, deaf communities, cross-cultural communication, and the circulation of silence as a creative resource within the college classroom and for college writers.
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The Emotional Foundation of Racial Attitudes in America

Author: Antoine J. Banks

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107049830

Category: Political Science

Page: 220

View: 805

Anger and Racial Politics examines the place of emotion in the scheme of politics and political preferences.
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Author: Thomas Rath

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 1469608359

Category: History

Page: 256

View: 7415

At the end of the Mexican Revolution in 1920, Mexico's large, rebellious army dominated national politics. By the 1940s, Mexico's Institutional Revolutionary Party (PRI) was led by a civilian president and claimed to have depoliticized the army and achieved the bloodless pacification of the Mexican countryside through land reform, schooling, and indigenismo. However, historian Thomas Rath argues, Mexico's celebrated demilitarization was more protracted, conflict-ridden, and incomplete than most accounts assume. Civilian governments deployed troops as a police force, often aimed at political suppression, while officers meddled in provincial politics, engaged in corruption, and crafted official history, all against a backdrop of sustained popular protest and debate. Using newly available materials from military, intelligence, and diplomatic archives, Rath weaves together an analysis of national and regional politics, military education, conscription, veteran policy, and popular protest. In doing so, he challenges dominant interpretations of successful, top-down demilitarization and questions the image of the post-1940 PRI regime as strong, stable, and legitimate. Rath also shows how the army's suppression of students and guerrillas in the 1960s and 1970s and the more recent militarization of policing have long roots in Mexican history.
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The Critical Legacy

Author: Laurence W. Mazzeno

Publisher: Camden House

ISBN: 9781571132628

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 239

View: 8428

Explores the critics' reaction to the pre-eminent Victorian poet from his lifetime to the present.
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