Author: Andrew Wilson,Miko Flohr

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0191065366

Category: History

Page: 408

View: 5939

This volume, featuring sixteen contributions from leading Roman historians and archaeologists, sheds new light on approaches to the economic history of urban craftsmen and traders in the Roman world, with a particular emphasis on the imperial period. Combining a wide range of research traditions from all over Europe and utilizing evidence from Italy, the western provinces, and the Greek-speaking east, this edited collection is divided into four sections. It first considers the scholarly history of Roman crafts and trade in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, focusing on Germany and the Anglo-Saxon world, and on Italy and France. Chapters discuss how scholarly thinking about Roman craftsmen and traders was influenced by historical and intellectual developments in the modern world, and how different (national) research traditions followed different trajectories throughout the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. The second section highlights the economic strategies of craftsmen and traders, examining strategies of long-distance traders and the phenomenon of specialization, and presenting case studies of leather-working and bread-baking. In the third section, the human factor in urban crafts and trade—including the role of apprenticeship, gender, freedmen, and professional associations—is analysed, and the volume ends by exploring the position of crafts in urban space, considering the evidence for artisanal clustering in the archaeological and papyrological record, and providing case studies of the development of commercial landscapes at Aquincum on the Danube and at Sagalassos in Pisidia.
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Author: Alan Bowman,Andrew Wilson

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN: 0199602352

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 362

View: 1436

A collection of essays presenting new analyses of data and evidence for population and settlement patterns, particularly urbanization, in the Mediterranean world from 100 BC to AD 350.
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Author: Cameron Hawkins

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107115442

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 316

View: 5421

Vividly reconstructs economic conditions in ancient Roman cities and the socio-economic strategies of artisans who lived in them.
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Author: André Tchernia

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0198723717

Category:

Page: 400

View: 5123

Andre Tchernia is one of the leading experts on amphorae as a source of economic history, a pioneer of maritime archaeology, and author of a wealth of articles on Roman trade, notably the wine trade. This book brings together the author's previously published essays, updated and revised, with recent notes and prefaced with an entirely new synthesis of his views on Roman commerce with a particular emphasis on the people involved in it. The book is divided into two main parts. The first is a general study of the structure of Roman trade: landowners and traders, traders' fortunes, the matter of the market, the role of the state, and dispatching what is required. It tackles the recent debates on Roman trade and Roman economy, providing, original and convincing answers. The second part of the book is a selection of 14 of the author's published papers, which range from discussions of general topics such as the ideas of crisis and competition, the approvisioning of Ancient Rome, trade with the East, to more specialized studies, such as the interpretation of the 33 AD crisis. Overall, the book contains a wealth of insights into the workings of ancient trade and expertly combines discussion of the material evidence--especially of amphorae and wrecks-with the prosopographical approach derived from epigraphic, papyrological, and historical data.
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Author: Andrew Wilson,Miko Flohr

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0198786573

Category:

Page: 456

View: 1501

This volume presents fourteen papers by Roman archaeologists and historians discussing approaches to the economic history of Pompeii, and the role of the Pompeian evidence in debates about the Roman economy. Four themes are discussed. The first of these is the position of Pompeii and its agricultural environment, discussing the productivity and specialization of agriculture in the Vesuvian region, and the degree to which we can explain Pompeii's size and wealth on the basis of the city's economichinterland. A second issue discussed is what Pompeians got out of their economy: how well-off were people in Pompeii? This involves discussing the consumption of everyday consumer goods, analyzing archaeobotanical remains to highlight the quality of Pompeian diets, and discussing what bone remainsreveal about the health of the inhabitants of Pompeii. A third theme is economic life in the city: how are we to understand the evidence for crafts and manufacturing? How are we to assess Pompeii's commercial topography? Who were the people who actually invested in constructing shops and workshops?In which economic contexts were Pompeian paintings produced? Finally, the volume discusses money and business: how integrated was Pompeii into the wider world of commerce and exchange, and what can the many coins found at Pompeii tell us about this? What do the wax tablets found near Pompeii tell usabout trade in the Bay of Naples in the first century AD? Together, the chapters of this volume highlight how Pompeii became a very rich community, and how it profited from its position in the centre of the Roman world.
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The Retail Trade in the Late Republic and the Principate

Author: Claire Holleran

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 019969821X

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 304

View: 5307

This volume provides the first comprehensive account of the retail network in ancient Rome and investigates the diverse means by which goods were sold to consumers in the city. Holleran places Roman retail trade within the wider context of its urban economy and explores the critical relationship between retail and broader environmental factors.
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City Planning and Administration

Author: O. F. Robinson

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 113484493X

Category: History

Page: 272

View: 3017

Rome was a huge city. Running it required not only public works and services but also specialised law. This innovative work traces the development of that law and system in the main areas of administration. The book incorporates and develops previous historical and topographical works by relating their findings to the Roman legal framework, building up a portrait of public administration, unusually comprehensive for the ancient world.
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Author: Paul Erdkamp,Koenraad Verboven,Arjan Zuiderhoek

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 0198728921

Category: Land use

Page: 440

View: 7117

This volume focuses on how the institutional set-up, or structure, of the Roman Empire positively or negatively affected economic performance. An international range of contributors offers a variety of approaches that together enhance our understanding of how different ownership rights and various modes of organization and exploitation facilitated or prevented the use of land and natural resources in the production process.
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Author: Peter Temin

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 069114768X

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 299

View: 941

"The study of ancient economies has for many generations been a fiercely debated field. Peter Temin has produced a book that will in many ways foster renewed energy in this great debate. What is of special value here is his economic analysis, including the use of regressions to show that price movements in the Roman provinces must be linked to those in Rome itself, and that the Roman economy, therefore, was a market economy. Whether one agrees or not with this basic conclusion, the framing of the evidence will alter the terms of the debate, and not just for the Roman economy but for Hellenistic economies as well. The book is a must-read for all economic historians and will surely become one of the most widely read books on the ancient economy."--J. G. Manning, Yale University "Peter Temin's fascinating book deploys the techniques of economic analysis to understand the nature of Roman trade, markets, and transactions, and definitively challenges the view of the Roman Empire as a 'primitive' economy. Stressing the importance of markets, trade, commerce, and banking, and emphasizing their prominence in the evidence from ancient texts and archaeology, Temin offers a sophisticated account of Rome's economic institutions and practices that fundamentally revises and enriches our understanding of the prosperity and the decline of this major imperial power."--Alan K. Bowman, University of Oxford "This is a very important book, and I know of no other quite like it. Temin's scholarship promotes and illustrates the relevance of economic theory to the study of Roman history. "The Roman Market Economy" contains plenty of claims that are controversial, but that's what will energize the debate."--Walter Scheidel, coeditor of "The Oxford Handbook of Roman Studies" "Economic historians have actively studied medieval and early modern Europe for decades, but few have ventured back as far as Peter Temin does here. He demonstrates that economic arguments apply just as well to the ancient world, and that even quite general propositions can be tested against evidence from antiquity."--Francois R. Velde, coauthor of "The Big Problem of Small Change" "
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Author: Harold A. Innis

Publisher: Dundurn

ISBN: 1550029088

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 288

View: 5840

It’s been said that without Harold A. Innis there could have been no Marshall McLuhan. Empire and Communications is one of Innis’s most important contributions to the debate about how media influence the development of consciousness and societies. In this seminal text, he traces humanity’s movement from the oral tradition of preliterate cultures to the electronic media of recent times. Along the way, he presents his own influential concepts of oral communication, time and space bias, and monopolies of knowledge.
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Work, Economy, and Society in Roman Italy

Author: Miko Flohr

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 0191634212

Category: History

Page: 424

View: 418

The World of the 'Fullo' takes a detailed look at the fullers, craftsmen who dealt with high-quality garments, of Roman Italy. Analyzing the social and economic worlds in which the fullers lived and worked, it tells the story of their economic circumstances, the way they organized their workshops, the places where they worked in the city, and their everyday lives on the shop floor and beyond. Through focusing on the lower segments of society, Flohr uses everyday work as the major organizing principle of the narrative: the volume discusses the decisions taken by those responsible for the organization of work, and how these decisions subsequently had an impact on the social lives of people carrying out the work. It emphasizes how socio-economic differences between cities resulted in fundamentally different working lives for many of their people, and that not only were economic activities shaped by Roman society, they in turn played a key role in shaping it. Using an in-depth and qualitative analysis of material remains related to economic activities, with a combined study of epigraphic and literary records, this volume portrays an insightful view of the socio-economic history of urban communities in the Roman world.
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Author: Paul Erdkamp

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521896290

Category: History

Page: 625

View: 4061

Rome was the largest city in the ancient world. As the capital of the Roman Empire, it was clearly an exceptional city in terms of size, diversity and complexity. While the Colosseum, imperial palaces and Pantheon are among its most famous features, this volume explores Rome primarily as a city in which many thousands of men and women were born, lived and died. The thirty-one chapters by leading historians, classicists and archaeologists discuss issues ranging from the monuments and the games to the food and water supply, from policing and riots to domestic housing, from death and disease to pagan cults and the impact of Christianity. Richly illustrated, the volume introduces groundbreaking new research against the background of current debates and is designed as a readable survey accessible in particular to undergraduates and non-specialists.
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Archaeological and Theoretical Perspectives

Author: Martin Pitts

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107043743

Category: History

Page: 308

View: 7737

This book applies modern theories of globalisation to the ancient Roman world, creating new understandings of Roman archaeology and history. This is the first book to intensely scrutinize the subject through a team of international specialists studying a wide range of topics, including imperialism, economics, migration, urbanism and art.
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The Venetian Sense of the Past

Author: Patricia Fortini Brown

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 0300067003

Category: Art

Page: 361

View: 6052

Drawing on such remains of vernacular culture as inscriptions, medals, travellers accounts, and antique writings, as well as the art of the period, this text focuses on Venice's Golden Age and shows how it was influenced by antiquity, by its Byzantine heritage and by its own historical experience.
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Author: Moses I. Finley

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 9780520025646

Category: Economic history

Page: 222

View: 9456

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From The Classical World to the Cold War

Author: James Lacey

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 019062048X

Category: History

Page: 592

View: 4118

From the legendary antagonism between Athens and Sparta during the Peloponnesian War to the Napoleonic Wars and the two World Wars of the twentieth century, the past is littered with long-term strategic rivalries. History tells us that such enduring rivalries can end in one of three ways: a series of exhausting conflicts in which one side eventually prevails, as in the case of the Punic Wars between ancient Rome and Carthage, a peaceful and hopefully orderly transition, like the rivalry between Great Britain and the United States at the turn of the twentieth century, or a one-sided collapse, such as the conclusion of the Cold War with the fall of the Soviet Union. However, in spite of a wealth of historical examples, the future of state rivalries remains a matter of conjecture. Great Strategic Rivalries explores the causes and implications of past strategic rivalries, revealing lessons for the current geopolitical landscape. Each chapter offers an accessible narrative of a historically significant rivalry, comprehensively covering the political, diplomatic, economic, and military dimensions of its history. Featuring original essays by world-class historians--including Barry Strauss, Geoffrey Parker, Williamson Murray, and Geoffrey Wawro--this collection provides an in-depth look at how interstate relations develop into often violent rivalries and how these are ultimately resolved. Much more than an engaging history, Great Strategic Rivalries contains valuable insight into current conflicts around the globe for policymakers and policy watchers alike.
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Their Origins and the Revival of Trade

Author: Henri Pirenne

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 1400851203

Category: History

Page: 208

View: 3942

Nearly a century after it was first published in 1925, Medieval Cities remains one of the most provocative works of medieval history ever written. Here, Henri Pirenne argues that it was not the invasion of the Germanic tribes that destroyed the civilization of antiquity, but rather the closing of Mediterranean trade by Arab conquest in the seventh century. The consequent interruption of long-distance commerce accelerated the decline of the ancient cities of Europe. Pirenne challenges conventional wisdom by attributing the origins of medieval cities to the revival of trade, tracing their growth from the tenth century to the twelfth. He also describes the important role the middle class played in the development of the modern economic system and modern culture. Featuring a new introduction by Michael McCormick, this Princeton Classics edition of Medieval Cities is essential reading for all students of medieval European history.
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Author: Barbara E. Borg

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 1405192887

Category: Art

Page: 664

View: 4011

A Companion to Roman Art encompasses various artistic genres, ancient contexts, and modern approaches for a comprehensive guide to Roman art. Offers comprehensive and original essays on the study of Roman art Contributions from distinguished scholars with unrivalled expertise covering a broad range of international approaches Focuses on the socio-historical aspects of Roman art, covering several topics that have not been presented in any detail in English Includes both close readings of individual art works and general discussions Provides an overview of main aspects of the subject and an introduction to current debates in the field
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Author: Wilhelmina F. Jashemski,Kathryn L. Gleason,Kim J. Hartswick,Amina-Aïcha Malek

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1108325831

Category: Art

Page: N.A

View: 2276

In Gardens of the Roman Empire, the pioneering archaeologist Wilhelmina F. Jashemski sets out to examine the role of ancient Roman gardens in daily life throughout the empire. This study, therefore, includes for the first time, archaeological, literary, and artistic evidence about ancient Roman gardens across the entire Roman Empire from Britain to Arabia. Through well-illustrated essays by leading scholars in the field, various types of gardens are examined, from how Romans actually created their gardens to the experience of gardens as revealed in literature and art. Demonstrating the central role and value of gardens in Roman civilization, Jashemski and a distinguished, international team of contributors have created a landmark reference work that will serve as the foundation for future scholarship on this topic.
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Author: Aidan Southall

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521784320

Category: Social Science

Page: 473

View: 748

This ambitious study treats urbanization and urbanism all over the world, and from the earliest times to the present. Professor Southall, a pioneer in the study of African cities, discusses the urban centers of ancient, medieval and modern cities. Drawing on an historical and comparative perspective, he offers a fresh analysis of world urbanization in the contemporary period of globalization. Throughout the book, he emphasizes the enduring paradox of the city, which juxtaposes splendid cultural productions with the poverty and deprivation of the majority.
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