Author: Dr John Rich,John Rich,Graham Shipley

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134919905

Category: History

Page: 328

View: 6069

This volume focuses on the changing relationship between warfare and the Roman citizen body, from the Republic, when war was at the heart of Roman life, through to the Principate, when it was confined to professional soldiers and expansion largely ceased, and finally on to the Late Empire and the Roman army's eventual failure.
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Author: Dr John Rich,John Rich,Graham Shipley

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 113480783X

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 5897

The role of warfare is central to our understanding of the ancient Greek world. In this book and the companion work, War and Society in the Roman World, the wider social context of war is explored. This volume examines its impact on Greek society from Homeric times to the age of Alexander and his successors and discusses the significance of the causes and profits of war, the links between war, piracy and slavery, and trade, and the ideology of warfare in literature and sculpture.
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Asia, the Mediterranean, Europe, and Mesoamerica

Author: Kurt A. Raaflaub,Nathan Stewart Rosenstein

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 484

View: 9230

A unique, multi-authored social history of war from the third millennium B.C.E. to the tenth century C.E. in the Mediterranean, the Near East, and Europe (Egypt, Achaemenid Persia, Greece, the Hellenistic World, the Roman Republic and Empire, the Byzantine Empire, the early Islamic World, and early Medieval Europe), with parallel studies of Mesoamerica (the Maya and Aztecs) and East Asia (ancient China, medieval Japan). The product of a colloquium at Harvard's Center for Hellenic Studies, this volume offers a broadly based, comparative examination of war and military organization in their complex interactions with social, economic, and political structures as well as cultural practices.
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Author: J. B. Campbell

Publisher: Psychology Press

ISBN: 9780415278812

Category: History

Page: 208

View: 3774

This study of the Roman army provides a crucial aid to understanding the Roman Empire in economic, social and political terms. The army was a dominant factor in the life of the Roman people even in times of peace. Troops were stationed in the provinces, perpetually ready for war. When Augustus established a permanent, professional army, this implied a role for the emperor as a military leader. War and Society in Imperial rome examines this personal association between army and emperor, and argues that the emperor's political survival ultimately depended on the army. Dealing with issues such as motives for waging war, the soldiers' social background, methods of fighting and military organization, Brian Campbell explores the wider significance of the army and warfare in Roman life and culture. This superbly researched survey is based on a wide range of evidence including writers, inscriptions, coins and buildings. It provides students with an invaluable guide to this important subject.
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A Very Short Introduction

Author: Harry Sidebottom

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0192804707

Category: History

Page: 165

View: 7771

"This book explores the ways in which ancient society thought about conflict. Many aspects of ancient warfare are examined from philosophy to the technical skills needed to fight"--Provided by publisher.
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Author: Paul Erdkamp

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 9781444393767

Category: History

Page: 600

View: 2547

This companion provides an extensive account of the Roman army, exploring its role in Roman politics and society as well as the reasons for its effectiveness as a fighting force. An extensive account of the Roman army, from its beginnings to its transformation in the later Roman Empire Examines the army as a military machine – its recruitment, training, organization, tactics and weaponry Explores the relationship of the army to Roman politics, economics and society more broadly Considers the geography and climate of the lands in which the Romans fought Each chapter is written by a leading expert in a particular subfield and takes account of the latest scholarly and archaeological research in that area
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Author: Joel Allen

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521861837

Category: History

Page: 291

View: 8134

This 2006 book examines hostage-taking in ancient Rome, which was a standard practice of international diplomacy. Hundreds of foreign hostages, typically adolescents, were detained as the empire grew in the Republic and early Principate.
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From the Bronze Age to the Fall of Rome

Author: Stefan G. Chrissanthos

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN: 031304192X

Category: History

Page: 248

View: 3016

From the clash of bronze weapons on bronze armor to the fall of Rome, war often decided the course of ancient history. This volume is a practical introduction to the study of warfare in the ancient world, beginning with Egypt and Mesopotamia, and tracing the advances made in battle tactics, technology, and government over hundreds of years, culminating with developments in Greece and the Roman Empire. The chronological structure allows the reader to trace certain general themes down through the centuries: how various civilizations waged war; who served in the various armies and why; who the generals and officers were who made the decisions in the field; what type of government controlled these armies; and from what type of society they sprang. Major events and important individuals are discussed in their historical contexts, providing a complete understanding of underlying causes, and enabling readers to follow the evolution of ancient warfare as armies and empires became steadily larger and more sophisticated. Yet as Chrissanthos makes clear, history comes full circle during this period. Rome's collapse in 476 C.E. inaugurated an unforeseen dark age in which great armies were left decimated despite advanced technology that, while proving decisive in the outcome of many critical battles and stand-offs, had vanished amidst the Empire's crumbling walls. In addition to the chronological treatment, Chrissanthos also includes sections on such important topics as chariot warfare, cavalry, naval warfare, elephants in battle, the face of battle, and such vital, but often-overlooked topics as the provisioning of the army with sufficient food and water. Eyewitness accounts are incorporated throughout each chapter, allowing the reader brief glimpses into the life and times of peasants and soldiers, generals and politicians, all of whom were dealing with war and its irreconcilable consequences from differing vantage points. Battle diagrams and maps are carefully placed throughout the text to help the reader visualize particular aspects of ancient warfare. The book also furnishes a detailed timeline and an extensive bibliography containing both modern and ancient sources.
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Author: Philip Sabin,Hans van Wees,Michael Whitby

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521782732

Category: History

Page: 694

View: 9719

First volume of a systematic and up-to-date account of warfare from Archaic Greece to Republican Rome.
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Author: Matthew Bunson

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780195102338

Category: Foreign Language Study

Page: 494

View: 690

The extraordinarily rich cultural legacy of the Roman world has had a profound affect world civilization. Roman achievements in architecture, law, politics, literature, war, and philosophy serve as the foundation of modern Western society. Now, for the first time in an A-Z format, A Dictionary of the Roman Empire assembles the people, places, events, and ideas of this remarkable period in one easy-to-use source. With over 1,900 entries covering more than five hundred years of Roman history, from Julius Caesar and the Gallic Wars (59-51 B.C.) to the fall of Romulus Augustus, the last Roman emperor (476 A.D.), this accessible guide provides quick reference to one of the most studied periods of all antiquity. Every aspect of Roman life is included. Here are profiles of the great emperors, such as Marcus Aurelius, one of the most profoundly intellectual monarchs in western civilization, and the aberrant Gaius Caligula, who, after draining the Roman treasury with his eccentric behavior, made it a capital crime for citizens not to bequeath him their estates. Informative entries describe the complex workings of Roman government, such as census taking, the creation of civil service, coinage, and the venerable institution of the Senate, and offer insight into the various trends and cultural tastes that developed throughout Roman history. For example, a discussion on baths, the most common type of building in the Roman Empire, demonstrates the unique intermingling of luxury, community, recreation, and, in the provinces, an association with Rome, that served as the focus of any city aspiring to greatness. Other entries describe the practice of paganism, marriage and divorce, ludi (public games held to entertain the Roman populace), festivals of the Roman year, and gluttony (epitomized by famous gourmands such as the emperor Vitellius, who according to the historian Suetonius, lived for food, banqueting three or four times a day, routinely vomiting up his meal and starting over). Also featured are longer essays on such topics as art and architecture, gods and goddesses, and the military, as well as a chronology, a short glossary of Roman terms, and appendices listing the emperors of the Empire and diagram the often intertwined family trees of ruling dynasties. Comprehensive, authoritative, and illustrated with over sixty illustrations and maps, A Dictionary of the Roman Empire provides easy access to the remarkable civilization upon which Western society was built.
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Author: Nathan Rosenstein,Robert Morstein-Marx

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 1444357204

Category: History

Page: 776

View: 4434

This Companion provides an authoritative and up-to-date overview of Roman Republican history as it is currently practiced. Highlights recent developments, including archaeological discoveries, fresh approaches to textual sources, and the opening up of new areas of historical study Retains the drama of the Republic’s rise and fall Emphasizes not just the evidence of texts and physical remains, but also the models and assumptions that scholars bring to these artefacts Looks at the role played by the physical geography and environment of Italy Offers a compact but detailed narrative of military and political developments from the birth of the Roman Republic through to the death of Julius Caesar Discusses current controversies in the field
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The Roman Conquest of Greece

Author: Robin Waterfield

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 0191664146

Category: History

Page: 336

View: 5374

The Romans first set military foot on Greek soil in 229 BCE; only sixty or so years later it was all over, and shortly thereafter Greece became one of the first provinces of the emerging Roman Empire. It was an incredible journey - a swift, brutal, and determined conquest of the land to whose art, philosophy, and culture the Romans owed so much. Rome found the eastern Mediterranean divided, in an unstable balance of power, between three great kingdoms - the three Hellenistic kingdoms that had survived and flourished after the wars of Alexander the Great's Successors: Macedon, Egypt, and Syria. Internal troubles took Egypt more or less out of the picture, but the other two were reduced by Rome. Having established itself, by its defeat of Carthage, as the sole superpower in the western Mediterranean, Rome then systematically went about doing the same in the east, until the entire Mediterranean was under her control. Apart from the thrilling military action, the story of the Roman conquest of Greece is central to the story of Rome itself and the empire it created. As Robin Waterfield shows, the Romans developed a highly sophisticated method of dominance by remote control over the Greeks of the eastern Mediterranean - the cheap option of using authority and diplomacy to keep order rather than standing armies. And it is a story that raises a number of fascinating questions about Rome, her empire, and her civilization. For instance, to what extent was the Roman conquest a planned and deliberate policy? What was it about Roman culture that gave it such a will for conquest? And what was the effect on Roman intellectual and artistic culture, on their very identity, of their entanglement with an older Greek civilization, which the Romans themselves recognized as supreme?
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An Empire's Story

Author: Greg Woolf

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199972176

Category: History

Page: 384

View: 852

The very idea of empire was created in ancient Rome and even today traces of its monuments, literature, and institutions can be found across Europe, the Near East, and North Africa--and sometimes even further afield. In Rome, historian Greg Woolf expertly recounts how this mammoth empire was created, how it was sustained in crisis, and how it shaped the world of its rulers and subjects--a story spanning a millennium and a half of history. The personalities and events of Roman history have become part of the West's cultural lexicon, and Woolf provides brilliant retellings of each of these, from the war with Carthage to Octavian's victory over Cleopatra, from the height of territorial expansion under the emperors Trajan and Hadrian to the founding of Constantinople and the barbarian invasions which resulted in Rome's ultimate collapse. Throughout, Woolf carefully considers the conditions that made Rome's success possible and so durable, covering topics as diverse as ecology, slavery, and religion. Woolf also compares Rome to other ancient empires and to its many later imitators, bringing into vivid relief the Empire's most distinctive and enduring features. As Woolf demonstrates, nobody ever planned to create a state that would last more than a millennium and a half, yet Rome was able, in the end, to survive barbarian migrations, economic collapse and even the conflicts between a series of world religions that had grown up within its borders, in the process generating an image and a myth of empire that is apparently indestructible. Based on new research and compellingly told, this sweeping account promises to eclipse all previously published histories of the empire.
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Exploding the Myth of Social Evolution

Author: Graeme Snooks

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134700032

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 600

View: 2969

The Ephemeral Civilization is an astonishing intellectual feat in which Graeme Snooks develops an original and ground-breaking analysis of changing sociopolitical forms over the past 3,000 years. Snooks challenges the prevailing theories of social evolutionism with an innovative approach which also looks ahead to the twenty-first century. The Ephemeral Civilization builds on the model of dynamic strategy outlined in the author's highly acclaimed companion volume, The Dynamic Society. The Ephemeral Society is divided into three parts - theory, history and future.
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7th - 15th Centuries

Author: Yaacov Lēv

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9789004100329

Category: History

Page: 410

View: 8260

This volume focusses on the interplay between war and society in the Eastern Mediterranean, in a period which witnessed the Arab conquests, the Seljuk invasion, the Crusades, and the Mongol incursions. The military aspects of these momentous events have not been fully discussed so far. For the first time this book offers a synthesis of trends in military technology and its effect on society in the period from the Arab conquests to the establishment of an Ottoman hegemony. "War and Society in the Eastern Mediterranean" provides for medievalists an Oriental context to the military aspects of the Crusades, and for scholars of both Middle Eastern and military history a coherent treatment of an important topic over a long period and covering many different cultures.
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Studien zur Rezeption der attischen Tragödie und der hellenistischen Dichtung im "Bellum civile"

Author: Annemarie Ambühl

Publisher: Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG

ISBN: 3110390361

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 496

View: 6587

In his civil war epic, the Roman poet Lucan draws extensively on his literary forbears. This study fills a gap in the research by going beyond the boundaries of language and genre to examine his reception of Greek literature, especially Attic tragedy and Hellenistic poetry. It reveals the importance of mythical and literary models, such as the Trojan War and the fratricidal war around Thebes, for Lucan’s epic formulation of the civil war theme.
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Author: Robin Lorsch Wildfang,Jacob Isager

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 79

View: 6434

The ancient Romans believed that the gods sent signs of future events to men through the flight of birds, meteorological disturbances and other natural phenomena. These signs influenced every sphere of ancient life, both public and private, from a states decision to go to war or make peace, hold an election or meet a public crisis to an individuals business, marriage or travel plans. The book illustrates how the various Roman divinatory techniques were inter-woven into the structures of ancient society as well as how they were used in literary contexts. The intriguing question of the alleged doublethink among the Roman intellectuals in their attitude to Divination is another important theme taken up in "Divination & Portents in the Roman World".
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Author: Michael Whitby

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 1472809777

Category: History

Page: 96

View: 9708

In the early third century AD the Roman Empire was a force to be reckoned with, controlling vast territories and wielding enormous political power from Scotland to the Sahara. 400 years later this mighty Empire was falling apart in the face of successive problems that the rulers failed to deal with. In this challenging new volume Michael Whitby tackles the fundamental issues (such as the rise of Christianity) that led to the 'decline and fall' of the Roman Empire, and offers a startling reassessment of the performance of the late Roman army.
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Farms, Families, and Death in the Middle Republic

Author: Nathan Stewart Rosenstein

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

ISBN: 9780807828397

Category: History

Page: 339

View: 8076

Historians have long asserted that during and after the Hannibalic War, the Roman Republic's need to conscript men for long-term military service helped bring about the demise of Italy's small farms and that the misery of impoverished citizens then became
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Author: Jeremy Armstrong

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9004284850

Category: History

Page: 332

View: 6379

Circum Mare presents a thematic approach to current directions in ancient military studies, bringing together studies on cultures from across the Mediterranean world, ranging from Pharaonic Egypt to Late Antique Europe and from Punic Spain to Persian Anatolia.
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